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PLANKTON found in space: Sea creatures are discovered living on the exterior of the ISS

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posted on Aug, 19 2014 @ 05:55 PM
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a reply to: loam

Thanks for the post Loam! Very interesting indeed.

They claim the plankton were not carried there at launch – but are thought to have been blown there by air currents on Earth.


So they really do not know for sure just yet?
Blown by air currents into outer space? Am I missing something there?

Is the ISS in atmosphere? I thought it was in the vacuum of space?
edit on 23014245685 by zysin5 because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 19 2014 @ 05:55 PM
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Another significant dent in modern theories regarding what kinds of environments are capable of supporting life. This ought to make for some sore little hurt butts in the science community. Gotta love it ;-)



posted on Aug, 19 2014 @ 05:58 PM
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I think some leaps in logic have been taken here that lead us to conclusions that are not proven. First how do they know how the plankton got to space? The most likely way is that they were present during some launch mission to the station. I think the only true fact we can take from this is that they are able to survive up there in some form. How many old satellites and other objects have we found plankton on?



posted on Aug, 19 2014 @ 06:00 PM
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a reply to: loam

You're last paragraph did it for me on top of the info you supplied.

Keep up the good work



posted on Aug, 19 2014 @ 06:04 PM
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Interesting that only UK tabloids are carrying this story. If this were real there would be a scientific paper detailing what their "precision equipment" and process is.

I'm calling this b.s. because the whole thing they laid out is not how science works and no one else is reporting it but papers with a VERY dubious track record regarding science stories.



posted on Aug, 19 2014 @ 06:07 PM
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Interesting article.....


Phytoplankton-tiny, photosynthetic organisms-are essential to life on Earth, supplying us with roughly half the oxygen we breathe. Like all other life forms, phytoplankton require the element phosphorus to carry out critical cellular activity, but in some parts of the world's ocean, P is in limited supply. How do phytoplankton survive when phosphorus is difficult to find?


Link



posted on Aug, 19 2014 @ 06:07 PM
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a reply to: loam

I just have one question for you on this, how do we know it isn't Niburu's gravity pulling the plankton off planet. It makes sense that they would be one of the first organisms affected by it with their extremely light weight.

Sorry, I thought of it and just couldn't resist



posted on Aug, 19 2014 @ 06:08 PM
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originally posted by: funbox
a reply to: Blue Shift
hmm that lander drops on that asteroid/comet soon ...
could there be a second discovery I wonder

There was some loose talk around the time of Apollo 12 that they found some bacteria still in a livable state on a piece of Surveyor 3 they brought back. That turned out to be a case of contamination, though. I wonder if they studied those window wipers close enough to rule out contamination.



posted on Aug, 19 2014 @ 06:08 PM
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Interesting if true. They'd either have to be some kind of phytoplankton or there is some sort of mini-ecosystem at work feeding them.



posted on Aug, 19 2014 @ 06:09 PM
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Good find.

I bet there is a whole load of stuff stuck to satellites and the ISS if science cares to look.

We are stardust, chances are the seeds of life are abundant in space, and well, everywhere in the Universe.

We know clouds contain bacteria and are essentially 'live', there are so many interesting finds, science just got more interesting.

en.itar-tass.com...
edit on 19-8-2014 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 19 2014 @ 06:09 PM
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originally posted by: MasterOfTheDamned
I just have one question for you on this, how do we know it isn't Niburu's gravity pulling the plankton off planet. It makes sense that they would be one of the first organisms affected by it with their extremely light weight.

That's not how gravity works. It pulls heavy objects the same as it does light objects. Galileo figured that one out.



posted on Aug, 19 2014 @ 06:09 PM
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a reply to: loam

It isn't plankton.
Have you noticed how our leaders are behaving strangely?
Be afraid, be very afraid.......



posted on Aug, 19 2014 @ 06:13 PM
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Well, I happen to be of the opinion that spacetime is fairly "porous," and full of little spaces where there isn't really anything, and if something is small enough it could basically fall out of space and instantaneously fall back into the universe at any place or any time. Not that it happened here.



posted on Aug, 19 2014 @ 06:14 PM
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If plankton can be blown into space by wind and survive (and thrive?), then maybe panspermia seems a lot more likely. I wonder if any plankton has blown to Mars and survived. I wonder if any plankton blew from Mars to Earth billions of years ago.
edit on 19-8-2014 by smithjustinb because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 19 2014 @ 06:14 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

Who shrunk the reptilians?

Does that mean the galactic federation of light is on the ISS?

Is it sneaking it's way here mini form in disguise?

I hope so, I hope they land on the Middle East then maximise.

While they are there, perhaps they can give us some good science to find out how exactly 'life as a plankton in space' works.
edit on 19-8-2014 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 19 2014 @ 06:15 PM
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They claim the plankton were not carried there at launch – but are thought to have been blown there by air currents on Earth.


originally posted by: zysin5
Blown by air currents into outer space? Am I missing something there?
Is the ISS in atmosphere? I thought it was in the vacuum of space?

I suspect that they mean they were blown there in air currants while the rocket was still in the atmosphere or on the launch pad. Considering that many of those parts came from the cape, and you get a sea breeze right at the launch site, it's not really that surprising that some of the ocean ends up on the station parts.



posted on Aug, 19 2014 @ 06:17 PM
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S&F!

Facinating indeed!

I'm wondering if every planet does this (those who got any kind of life on it) just so the universe is secure that, one day, it will reach a new planet, and keep producing life. It will sure take a long time, but the universe don't care about time!

Its reminds me of a article I read for some time ago, that trees gives nutrition to the trees around it, if they need it more than that tree.

I love how the universe seems to repeat all its simple, but very powerful tools to keep being alive.
We know nothing about the universe.



posted on Aug, 19 2014 @ 06:27 PM
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a reply to: loam

How naive, I mean I did not get a chance to read all of the threads, but how about, plankton are from space and adapted to earth, I like that perspective and theory much better than the ooh, ah, unbelievable response...honestly we know so little, earthlings take a moment to gather yourselves, your time in existence is but drop in the bucket in the sands of time...think outside of the box, err I mean the big blue marble.



posted on Aug, 19 2014 @ 06:28 PM
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so much for the "quarantine Mars to protect it from earth life contamination" types.


the first colonists will get a case of Martian e coli tummy troubles.
edit on 19-8-2014 by stormbringer1701 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 19 2014 @ 06:33 PM
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Plankton! There goes the neighborhood.




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