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the green flame

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posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 05:22 PM
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a reply to: Krakatoa

How about "Laira"? ....too obscure?




posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 05:28 PM
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originally posted by: Sammamishman
a reply to: Krakatoa

How about "Laira"? ....too obscure?

What, this Laira?



posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 05:37 PM
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a reply to: Krakatoa

Yup, that's the one. A female Green Lantern.



posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 05:58 PM
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a reply to: Sammamishman

I actually like that. Would be a cool sounding code name. Code Name LAIRA: "Sir Laira will be able to intercept the target within 25 minutes!" "We've got Laira tasked on this one...thank god! There's hope for this mission success after all lieutenant!"

meanwhile halfway across the world. cut to enemy soldiers standing guard at some janky secret base. "i've heard rumors that the americans have dispatched the Liara to hunt us." Other soldier gulps in silence slightly ashen in color looking like he's going to be sick.
edit on 8-11-2014 by BASSPLYR because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 07:47 PM
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I always thought "meteor" or "bolide" would be a good name for the project.

That way you could lie about it with a straight face. "Yes, you saw a meteor". And smile.



posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 07:49 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

I wouldn't be surprised if they did start calling it the Meteor.



posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 08:39 PM
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Have to be Meteor II as the original was one of the Uk,s first jet fighters..Plus the nickname for it is the "Meatbox"!!!..Honestly naming it is just a thing for parts suppliers/radar operators/ground controllers to keep track of :-P



posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 08:51 PM
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a reply to: Blackfinger

Being that she's quieted down for awhile, naming it is just a way to have fun around here until she kicks things up again.



posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 08:56 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Zaph,

Is she conked out, getting a break from partying too hard?

Or, Is she back vacationing on some tropical beach again? Or maybe sight seeing elsewhere more temperate. So typical with fast girls, they get around.


edit on 8-11-2014 by BASSPLYR because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 08:58 PM
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a reply to: BASSPLYR

She should be out and about in an area that she hasn't been in before. She was scheduled to visit around this time for at least a couple of weeks before coming back home.



posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 09:06 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Jet setting around the world again I see, leaving all of her stalk... uhh.. . admirers all alone. Typical. Well I'm sure her svelte methods will go to good use wherever it is she's frolicking.

Que Don Henley's "After the boys of summer" song.

edit on 8-11-2014 by BASSPLYR because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 9 2014 @ 12:14 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

A long time ago when I was a comparative yoot I did suggest we name various classes of projects "swamp gas" "meteor" "reflection" and the like.

" I'm sorry, you saw swamp gas"



posted on Nov, 9 2014 @ 12:27 AM
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Wow this looks like it may be possibly related ...

Anyone in the Houston area spot this tonight?


originally posted by: jhn7537
Hey ATS... This thread will be short and sweet. A girl I know who lives in the Houston area just posted this photo asking if anyone else saw this tonight?

I'm assuming meteor entering the atmosphere? I'm no expert on these type of things, but I figured I'd run it by ATS..




And ...



Green Flame or meteor





posted on Nov, 9 2014 @ 01:10 AM
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a reply to: ForeverMan

Looks to be a meteor or space debris on both accounts. If it seems to break-up, come apart, shoot sparks off or vary wildly in brightness and color as it comes into view and then disappears, it tends to scream meteor.

If it stays a fairly constant brightness and color across it entire visible flight path then I would sit up and take notice.



posted on Nov, 9 2014 @ 02:54 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: CiTrus90

I personally vote "Holy crap that's fast!" Or HCTF.


Or another suitable acronym could be: Seriously High And Amazingly Fast Terminator. SHAAFT for short



posted on Nov, 9 2014 @ 09:58 AM
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originally posted by: Sammamishman


Looks to be a meteor or space debris on both accounts. If it seems to break-up, come apart, shoot sparks off or vary wildly in brightness and color as it comes into view and then disappears, it tends to scream meteor.

If it stays a fairly constant brightness and color across it entire visible flight path then I would sit up and take notice.


Samm seems to me some of us are just here to cause trouble lol. Anyone with a brain could seperate the diffrences between the green flame and a meteor. SO obviously someones trolling a bit. Who? i dont know.


Anyway the footage from japan LACKS the sparks and stuff falling off too.A meteors make up makes it almost impossible to not spark or lose peices of itself coming through the air.



posted on Nov, 9 2014 @ 10:51 AM
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Lol. Yeah, the trolls seem to come in waves recently. The regulars like you and me know what the score is though.



A meteors make up makes it almost impossible to not spark or lose peices of itself coming through the air.


Depending on it's size, a dense iron/nickel meteoroid can stay intact enough as it burns up in the atmosphere to not have any visual sparks or anything breaking off. Chondrites, achondrites and stony-iron meteoroids however put on a show when they burn-up, break-up and spark as long as they are large enough to be visible far a long enough period of time.
edit on 9-11-2014 by Sammamishman because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 9 2014 @ 10:54 AM
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originally posted by: Sammamishman

A meteors make up makes it almost impossible to not spark or lose peices of itself coming through the air.


Depending on it's size, a dense iron/nickel meteoroid can stay intact enough as it burns up in the atmosphere to not have any visual sparks or anything breaking off. Chondrites, achondrites and stony-iron meteoroids however put on a show when they burn-up, break-up and spark as long as they are large enough to be visible far a long enough period of time.


True true. I forgot that little tidbit. Correct me if i am wrong though but if it burns green its a iron oxide meteor right?



posted on Nov, 9 2014 @ 10:58 AM
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a reply to: Sammamishman

it might not be along the entire flight path in my opinion. I believe it only uses the green during certain parts of it's flight path, during a critical stage. going green could have been a way to transverse a troublesome envelope. but i also believe that it can go green at will at various stages and enjoy the benefits.

One thing i noticed is that the stream of green is a deep green (like nyquil green) , yellow at the source, the green lingers almost like a laser in the exhaust trail for a while. maybe remains glowing from being ionized? It is also steady and doesn't have many inconsistencies as far as lumps in the exhaust or contrail. more like streak that grows in size up to point before fading. And although she travels fast, not literally meteor fast. I was able to watch it for several seconds at least 5. And the green only took up a certain section of the sky's length. Not from horizon to horizon.
edit on 9-11-2014 by BASSPLYR because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 9 2014 @ 10:58 AM
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a reply to: yuppa

I think it is nickel that is the most common cause of the green:



Vivid colors are more often reported by fireball observers because the brightness is great enough to fall well within the range of human color vision. These must be treated with some caution, however, because of well-known effects associated with the persistence of vision. Reported colors range across the spectrum, from red to bright blue, and (rarely) violet. The dominant composition of a meteoroid can play an important part in the observed colors of a fireball, with certain elements displaying signature colors when vaporized. For example, sodium produces a bright yellow color, nickel shows as green, and magnesium as blue-white. The velocity of the meteor also plays an important role, since a higher level of kinetic energy will intensify certain colors compared to others. Among fainter objects, it seems to be reported that slow meteors are red or orange, while fast meteors frequently have a blue color, but for fireballs the situation seems more complex than that, but perhaps only because of the curiosities of color vision as mentioned above.

The difficulties of specifying meteor color arise because meteor light is dominated by an emission, rather than a continuous, spectrum. The majority of light from a fireball radiates from a compact cloud of material immediately surrounding the meteoroid or closely trailing it. 95% of this cloud consists of atoms from the surrounding atmosphere; the balance consists of atoms of vaporized elements from the meteoroid itself. These excited particles will emit light at wavelengths characteristic for each element. The most common emission lines observed in the visual portion of the spectrum from ablated material in the fireball head originate from iron (Fe), magnesium (Mg), and sodium (Na). Silicon (Si) may be under-represented due to incomplete dissociation of SiO2 molecules. Manganese (Mn), Chromium (Cr), Copper (Cu) have been observed in fireball spectra, along with rarer elements. The refractory elements Aluminum (Al), Calcium (Ca), and Titanium (Ti) tend to be incompletely vaporized and thus also under-represented in fireball spectra.


www.amsmeteors.org...




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