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Police brutality on the rise; here's why

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posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 07:27 PM
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One of the guests on the Coast-To-Coast radio program the other night was Craig Hulet. He's an expert on all things law enforcement.
Global, federal, local... law enforcement.
This guy really knows some people in high and not-so-high places. He's been 'around the block', as it were. Officially, he's a consultant. He's consulted with agencies from big-time feds, right down to small local sheriff's departments. He's also an astute 'geo-political' analyist.
(I found it interesting that he's buddies with filmaker Oliver Stone.)

He confirms a lot of what we already know, then explains a little more, delving into his 30 years of experience. Police departments throughout the country are hiring people unsuited for the job. There's no vetting. There's no budget for training.

Hulet spoke with local police and sheriff's departments in 7 states, and they ALL agreed, the "Quality" of the personnel is the problem.

Then, he speaks at length of how "benign" federal agencies now have armed agents and SWAT teams... like the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, who raided a woman's home with a SWAT team because she had a piece of coral that is illegal to own!


Here's the Coast-To-Coast interview with Craig Hulet. Forward to 25:40. The interview ends at the 40:00 mark.





posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 08:10 PM
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edit on 14-8-2014 by violet because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 08:11 PM
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Ok will check out the video.

I thought it was known pretty much anyone (as long as they have no criminal record) can enter the police force.
At least it's this way in Canada with the RCMP. I know plenty of idiots who do, they are issued guns. They are young and on a big power trip. Me in uniform , me got gun, me can arrest you, me not like your fast car. I knew one guy who got into RCMP and he outright told me if he sees a guy in a fast hot car, he tickets them, just because "they are the type". He was stereotyping everyone. Ended up this guy was a stalker. A sexual predator. He tried locking me in his house and raping me. When i said i will call police , he said " i am the police". I got away by insisting he take me home, I have to go to work tomorrow, I begged for hours. He continued to stalk me for years, It horrifies me to see he is now an rcmp ambassador to child sex crimes in Thailand. Yeah he's an expert alright. Clearly this man was not screened for Psychological issues. This was 1979. No stalking laws back then. All you could do was stay clear of them.
edit on 14-8-2014 by violet because: (no reason given)

edit on 14-8-2014 by violet because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 08:17 PM
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This played out before my eyes when I lived in Tucson. As the City of Tucson and Pima County cut thier budgets for law enforcement, the quality officers moved on to jurisdictions in other cities that payed more. This left them with no choice but to keep the bad officers on staff, and lower quality standards for new hires. The longer I lived there, the worse it got... insanity.

Additionally, both departments suffered from low morale due to understaffing, overwork and poor training. Even good cops can go too far with that kind of stress.

My heart goes out to the good cops.
edit on 14-8-2014 by madmac5150 because: Edit to add

edit on 14-8-2014 by madmac5150 because: And so it goes...



posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 08:22 PM
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Ca reply to: ColeYounger

I heard the same program and he brought up some very good points. The biggest of which is the labor pool and the shortage of funds needed to properly train those who bother to apply to a dangerous, thankless and low paying job.

What really impressed me though was how he approached the subject. Calm, factual and mature. He stated the facts and how those facts are diluting the quality of law enforcement in towns that don't have any money to spend.

He was on for quite awhile and I ended up thinking........."Why don't we see this level of maturity and reasoning on topics like this on ATS? I've seen people in the science and U.F.O. forums have 10 pages worth of meaningful discussions on those topics, but when it comes to religion and social issues........forget about it.

Reasoning our way through this will show us that the government has no intention of militarizing law enforcement agencies. But when you don't pay and educate people to do work like this, you're left with unreasonable people who don't know how to communicate with the public without a gun.



posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 09:29 PM
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a reply to: ColeYounger

I really like Coast-to-Coast. Fabulous entertainment but I would never consider them a source for real information...at least hardly ever.

This is one case that is the exception to the rule. Makes sense and it appears, if his credentials are true, that Hulet would be one who should know.



posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 09:39 PM
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What should we expect from a culture that pays those that entertain you million dollar wages while those that, educate and protect you get paid bananas in comparison.



posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 09:51 PM
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a reply to: madmac5150

I'm glad you brought up poor training. Instead of putting school resource officers in our schools to train our children, we need to take the time to train our LEO.



posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 10:05 PM
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originally posted by: violet
Ok will check out the video.

I thought it was known pretty much anyone (as long as they have no criminal record) can enter the police force.
At least it's this way in Canada with the RCMP. I know plenty of idiots who do, they are issued guns. They are young and on a big power trip. Me in uniform , me got gun, me can arrest you, me not like your fast car. I knew one guy who got into RCMP and he outright told me if he sees a guy in a fast hot car, he tickets them, just because "they are the type". He was stereotyping everyone. Ended up this guy was a stalker. A sexual predator. He tried locking me in his house and raping me. When i said i will call police , he said " i am the police". I got away by insisting he take me home, I have to go to work tomorrow, I begged for hours. He continued to stalk me for years, It horrifies me to see he is now an rcmp ambassador to child sex crimes in Thailand. Yeah he's an expert alright. Clearly this man was not screened for Psychological issues. This was 1979. No stalking laws back then. All you could do was stay clear of them.



I have wanted to be a police officer since I was a kid. I have no record. They all require college and a long and stable job history. Or by what you say they are all lying to me. I have no college therefore I cannot be one. The background checks they do are very extensive.

I think the issue is society, and snot nose punks, and ghetto trash how no matter how much you give them, they still want to shoot at you and lie and resist and make your shift that night hell, so the police are sick and tired of it. The parents wont do squat about it. Try being polite to a leo. Works like a charm to me.
Firepiston



posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 10:11 PM
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a reply to: FirePiston
That's because now you can get a degree to be a police officer, go online and see. So while you have that low job you too can struggle with student loans.



posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 11:22 PM
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originally posted by: violet
Clearly this man was not screened for Psychological issues. This was 1979. No stalking laws back then. All you could do was stay clear of them.


Police still stalk and have it down to an art called gang-stalking. Qualifications to be a cop in the states vary wildly. Some will reject you if you score too high on an IQ test!



posted on Aug, 15 2014 @ 02:26 AM
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It should be common sense that just because you work for the police that you are not above the law. Do they not punish criminals to deter other criminals? I've read accounts of judges stating they sentenced someone to the max to deter other people, even though it should be about punishment, but my point is that the same thing should be applied to police. Start prosecuting officers who break the law, and punish them severely to deter such actions by other officers. They are not above the law. Seeing as how they enforce it, they should have a better grip on it than the average citizen, and they should also be held to a much higher standard. The saying is true...with more power comes more responsibility.



posted on Aug, 15 2014 @ 03:17 AM
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a reply to: FirePiston

This guy I mentioned was in college at SFU in Vancouver. The others I know were not.

I know if you are nice to a cop they are nice back, but sometimes they are just plain dickheads . I don' t see why one should have to kiss their ass to be treated with dignity. Female cops are the worst.
So it should be yes officer, anything you say officer and bow ?

They immediately make assumptions and stereotype you on the spot. It's not fair. If you are rich , you don't really have a problem, if you are poor, you have nothing but.

Just don't judge a book by it's cover. You never know when you've got it seriously wrong.



posted on Aug, 15 2014 @ 07:24 AM
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a reply to: violet

Are you not also guilty of making assumptions and stereotypes about police officers?

Police officers are humans. Humans are imperfect. It is that simple.



posted on Aug, 15 2014 @ 04:07 PM
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a reply to: TorqueyThePig
No. I know plenty of cops, I have one in my family . Some are good. Some are not.
I stand by my post that many are quick to judge.



posted on Aug, 15 2014 @ 04:12 PM
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a reply to: violet

The biggest problem I see...and one great reason I never had a desire to be an officer... is that they see, day in and day out, the very worst that humanity has to offer. That has to have an effect on one's psyche.

No doubt, some handle it better than others.

I have known a few cops in my life. The ones I had the pleasure of knowing were good people who handled it well and were able to "partition" their off duty lives and their professional lives. Even so, at times things would happen that would take their toll. Thankfully I have not known a "bad cop"... or at least not one I perceived as bad.



posted on Aug, 17 2014 @ 03:46 PM
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a reply to: ColeYounger

I condensed the show down to the relevant audio.



posted on Aug, 17 2014 @ 04:17 PM
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It would be nice to see each community elect its police. The job should be high pay and high esteem. Essentially they will be getting paid based on their reputation in the neighborhood. Some might say that would give bad neighborhoods the ability to elect bad police, at which I say I am glad to see they got off their behind and made it down to town/district hall.




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