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A Flight Test Instrument from *RADIATION INC.*

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posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 11:38 PM
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a reply to: lambchop

I'd say probably not because of the units.




posted on Aug, 15 2014 @ 12:06 AM
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a reply to: GenRadek

mate try emailing this lady

"Nancye Meyers at Harris Corporation has an unofficial archive including a full set of Radiation Annual Reports, a good collection of Radiation INK newsletters and assorted other documents, plus some hardware including the Strain Gage Amplifier and display unit below. She an be reached at nmeyers@harris.comor 321-729-7022."

she collects items from Radiation Inc

her details are public on this site
radiwiki.wikispaces.com...



posted on Aug, 15 2014 @ 12:22 AM
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a reply to: lambchop

Perfect!



posted on Aug, 15 2014 @ 12:25 PM
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a reply to: lambchop

Thanks! I think I will ask her about it for sure! This has been a fun little mystery that hopefully will shed some light on what I got!



posted on Sep, 6 2014 @ 09:59 AM
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I'm calling G meter... Simple +~ scale, reads to 10, appropriate range for a high performance aircraft.
It fit's and most other suggestions so far don't.
edit on 6-9-2014 by Wingspan because: Typo



posted on Sep, 6 2014 @ 10:27 AM
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Let us know what you find out from that lady who collects radiation inc. museum pieces.

Vertical velocity gauge from a sail plane sounded about right.

Thought it might be exotic like the indicator on the right in this U2 cockpit but the scale is wrong.

www.ablogtowatch.com...



posted on Sep, 6 2014 @ 01:20 PM
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VSI reads in feet per minute, scale reading goes to a couple of THOUSAND, not 10.



posted on Sep, 6 2014 @ 01:25 PM
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a reply to: Wingspan

It doesn't really make sense for aG meter either though. I've never heard of anything built that has gone more than 2-3 negative Gs at the most. Why go to 10.



posted on Sep, 6 2014 @ 01:38 PM
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Even a basic utility category aircraft is stressed to +6 -3. Most higher performance types will be +9 -6 .... Considering fighter aircraft since the 40's have been able to pull enough G to black out a pilot (8-9g) it's safe to say 10/10 is pretty standard... Go look at a supplier like Aircraft Spruce and you'll find -3/+6or -5/+10 is a common G meter.... And that's for light aircraft, not fighter jets!

edit on 692014 by Wingspan because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 6 2014 @ 03:11 PM
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The early VSI indicators were primarily barometric so you wouldn't necessarily expect pinouts in 1952.

Relatively modern 727 uses a 3 4 3 pinout pattern but in straight rows.

No language clues like "klettern" printed on the face, anyone have a photo of the VSI indicator off a Dash 80?



posted on Sep, 6 2014 @ 03:45 PM
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originally posted by: Wingspan
VSI reads in feet per minute, scale reading goes to a couple of THOUSAND, not 10.


VSI can read in either 100's or 1000's of feet per minute. Really depends on the aircraft performance which type of display makes sense.
edit on 6-9-2014 by _Del_ because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 6 2014 @ 03:55 PM
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originally posted by: Wingspan it's safe to say 10/10 is pretty standard... Go look at a supplier like Aircraft Spruce and you'll find -3/+6or -5/+10 is a common G meter.... And that's for light aircraft, not fighter jets!


Yet, I've never ever seen a G-meter with -10 on the read out...

Nor have I seen an aircraft so stressed. Yet I can think of many aircraft able to reach or exceed 10,000' per minute in a climb.


edit on 6-9-2014 by _Del_ because: (no reason given)



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