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Just In: Robin Williams Was Sober And In Early Stages Of Parkinson's Says Wife

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posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 02:36 PM
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LA Times - Robin Williams was sober, in early stages of Parkinson's disease, wife says


Robin Williams, who was found dead from an apparent suicide earlier this week, was battling the "early stages" of Parkinson’s disease at the time, his wife said in statement Thursday.

Susan Schneider also said Williams' sobriety was intact as "he struggled with his own battles of depression, anxiety as well as early stages of Parkinson’s Disease, which he was not yet ready to share publicly."


There's no word about when he'd received the diagnosis but I would imagine that it was weighing heavily on his mind and contributing to his depression and anxiety.
edit on 2014-8-14 by theantediluvian because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 02:44 PM
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a reply to: theantediluvian

I knew it! Not Parkinson's per se, but something was up.

You see, now this opens up a whole new ethical question about the right to "check out" if I may be so bold.



posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 02:46 PM
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I hope that some people cut the man some slack now.

He brought tons of laughs and good feelings to a huge number of people. We all owe him at least to have peace in death.



posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 02:51 PM
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a reply to: butcherguy

Absolutely. The pissing contests that hospitals do with families is deplorable. Like anyone has the ability to ever say what's good for you. And no one would never want to be a burden on someone when in poor health, especially men.
edit on 14-8-2014 by FlySolo because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 03:11 PM
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originally posted by: butcherguy
I hope that some people cut the man some slack now.

He brought tons of laughs and good feelings to a huge number of people. We all owe him at least to have peace in death.




I hope so too.



posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 03:38 PM
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originally posted by: FlySolo
I knew it! Not Parkinson's per se, but something was up.


I also wondered if he might have some health issue that we didn't know about. I TOTALLY support death with dignity. Too bad he didn't have that option and felt it necessary to die so tragically, instead of in a peaceful, loving way.



posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 03:54 PM
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a reply to: theantediluvian

That would do it. Being diagnosed with a chronic, progressive, incurable and disabling disease was actually one of the reasons why I attempted suicide in a major way 20 years ago. Glad I didn't succeed but the kind of despair that kicks in at that kind of diagnosis is intense.



posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 04:15 PM
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While I agree that might be plenty reason to commit suicide, I'm a little hung up on how he did it.
Am I correct in thinking he put a belt around his neck, wedged the belt in a door, and strangled himself?

I can think of many less painful ways to achieve the desired result, and as the man knew all about drug use he must have been aware how easy and painless it would be to just lie down and take an overdose. Why choose such a horrid way to do it?

Not trying to get at the man, just trying to understand why THAT way?



posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 04:16 PM
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a reply to: Benevolent Heretic

I think most of us consider an exit plan if our health fails and with that there is some consolation in knowing it wasn't just a bad mistake. As sad as it is, I can respect his wishes.



posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 04:22 PM
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a reply to: WhiteAlice

Couple that with alimony and being close to bankrupt. Man, that's gotta hit real hard. What a dark place to be in. I think there really isn't any professional in the world that can convince you otherwise not to take your life.



posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 05:17 PM
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originally posted by: FlySolo
a reply to: theantediluvian

I knew it! Not Parkinson's per se, but something was up.

You see, now this opens up a whole new ethical question about the right to "check out" if I may be so bold.


I completely agree with you. I was just talking about that recently, how people should have the choice to end their lives if they are going to be suffering a very long time because of an illness. ALS, MS, Parkinson's, those can be quite terrible to have to live with when your body is slowly failing you. It's humiliating & crushing.

One of my Uncle's ended up getting ALS. Within a year & a bit he went from being healthy to dead. His body shut down real fast but not without going through all the steps. In the end he couldn't even be in a wheel chair & had to have a chatheter & colostomy.

We don't let animals suffer, we euthanize them. Why is it that we let people suffer?



posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 05:31 PM
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a reply to: knoledgeispower

I know, it's mind boggling to see the tug-of-war that goes on with law makers and victim's rights. There was a large court case here in BC not that long ago on that exact thing.



posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 05:34 PM
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a reply to: theantediluvian

I'm almost 31 and am already showing signs of Parkinson's which is hereditary in my lineage, and I don't think I'd off myself over it. My uncle lived to be almost 90 and he had a very bad case of it to the point he could hardly feed himself or write any longer. Today, they have utensils and instruments that correct for the movements, not to mention brain surgeries that can reverse its effects to a large degree in some people, so you could live a relatively normal life right up unto the end.
edit on 14-8-2014 by Nechash because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 08:47 PM
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I was talking about this recently also, we put animals to sleep when they get too sick but MAKE people suffer. Only a selfish person would make a loved one suffer like that, make them lay in a bed and suffer so you can come see them when you want and when you go back home to live your life they lay there miserable until you come back to see them, not any kind of life anyone would want.



posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 08:57 PM
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they found his pocket knife out, he tried to cut his wrists...they said that is really painful, so, he did the belt thing because it was fast (30 seconds) makes sense in this context..

originally posted by: VoidHawk


While I agree that might be plenty reason to commit suicide, I'm a little hung up on how he did it.
Am I correct in thinking he put a belt around his neck, wedged the belt in a door, and strangled himself?

I can think of many less painful ways to achieve the desired result, and as the man knew all about drug use he must have been aware how easy and painless it would be to just lie down and take an overdose. Why choose such a horrid way to do it?

Not trying to get at the man, just trying to understand why THAT way?[/quote


edit on 14-8-2014 by research100 because: moved my sentence to the top



posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 09:09 PM
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originally posted by: research100



they found his pocket knife out, he tried to cut his wrists...they said that is really painful, so, he did the belt thing because it was fast (30 seconds) makes sense in this context..

originally posted by: VoidHawk


While I agree that might be plenty reason to commit suicide, I'm a little hung up on how he did it.
Am I correct in thinking he put a belt around his neck, wedged the belt in a door, and strangled himself?

I can think of many less painful ways to achieve the desired result, and as the man knew all about drug use he must have been aware how easy and painless it would be to just lie down and take an overdose. Why choose such a horrid way to do it?

Not trying to get at the man, just trying to understand why THAT way?



30 seconds? Most people can hold their breath for at least a minute and a half. Probably take two or three minutes before unconsciousness.
Why not just buy some drugs and go into a one way sleep?

I just find it puzzling that he would choose such a way to do this.

edit on 14-8-2014 by VoidHawk because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 09:26 PM
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a reply to: VoidHawk

If you cut off the blood to the brain, you will lose consciousness quickly... Death will follow with in a few minutes.



posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 10:38 PM
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a reply to: VoidHawk

Maybe, just maybe, he wanted to, needed to, go out self determined and sober...............

could it be possible?



posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 11:18 PM
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I figured he got some bad health news like cancer or something messed up. I just hope where he is that he is happy. He can be proud of what he accomplished with his time here on earth.



posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 11:29 PM
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originally posted by: FlySolo
a reply to: knoledgeispower

I know, it's mind boggling to see the tug-of-war that goes on with law makers and victim's rights. There was a large court case here in BC not that long ago on that exact thing.


I listened to a CBC interview with a women who had MS or ALS (I can't recall which one) & she knew what kind of a life was in store for her. She tried living with it for a while but she started to get worse at a faster rate. She decided to end her life & had to fly to Switzerland to do so. It was a great story to hear because it put a face to the struggle. Not everyone could afford to go to Switzerland to be there when she died so some of the family missed out.

It should be that you can decide you don't want to suffer any more with an illness. You tell your doctor and then you wait 6 months or longer to see if you still feel the same way & then go from there. People think it will lead to abuse but if you have a good solid system set up in the beginning with strict guidelines/protocols then you will have less of a chance for abuse to happen.



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