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Potentially Dangerous Asteroid Is Actually a Pile of Rubble. Is this associated with a EM field?

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posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 11:49 AM
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originally posted by: Ross 54
The Moon rotates so slowly (about once a month) that there is ample time for the Sun's electrically charged plasma to confer substantial electric charges on dust particles. On an asteroid rotating in just over two hours, this may not be the case. Perhaps this is the reason that the electrostatic force was not suggested as a means of holding together a super-rotating asteroid.

Also-- Since oppositely charged objects attract each other, the effect would not be uniform across the surface, but would be concentrated near the light/dark terminator. This seems to be what is observed on the Moon. The exception to this is with equipment brought to the Moon. This can have a charge differential, relative to the Moon's surface, which is apparently what allows dust to be attracted to spacesuits, and the like.


Some interesting side note on this and maybe also a possible connection to smaller objects like asteroids:

Seems as single grains of dust react differently to electrical chargement (by solar winds) then larger bulks of them.


* Small positively charged dust grains (grains with a deficiency of electrons) lose electrons (charge more positively) upon bombardment with an electron beam. Large positively charged grains gain electrons (discharge) to some constant charge (called equilibrium charge). * Both small and large negatively charged dust grains (grains with extra electrons) eject electrons (and therefore take on a less negative charge) upon bombardment.

Source: NASA




posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 01:12 PM
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I would like to suggest that it's being held together by ice. Frozen water. Like when you have to pry apart frozen hamburger patties. Sticks pretty good.



posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 01:39 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

I like how you think Blue Shift
something different to ad that would make sense also



posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 03:32 PM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift
I would like to suggest that it's being held together by ice. Frozen water. Like when you have to pry apart frozen hamburger patties. Sticks pretty good.


Unfortunatly this is most likely not the case.

Recently (in 2012) scientists found some water on Vesta but usually normal asteroids do not consist of much water themselfs. Also the water found on Vesta is most likely not part of its material itself but was condensed there later.

Comets do mostly consists of water but that's another chapter
.



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