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Time to disarm our cops?

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posted on Aug, 13 2014 @ 08:53 AM
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originally posted by: TorqueyThePig
a reply to: BasementWarriorKryptonite

So you feel that American society would continue on without issue without any police?


It would fall apart so fast, because of the society that it is. That said, if American society changed, it may not need the style of policing it is currently used to - it did well without it for a very long time.




posted on Aug, 13 2014 @ 08:57 AM
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a reply to: BasementWarriorKryptonite

Ah I see. So you want a big reset.

I can understand.
edit on 13-8-2014 by TorqueyThePig because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 13 2014 @ 09:01 AM
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a reply to: TorqueyThePig

Pretty much, which is so impossible as to be almost funny. But there has got to be a way of changing the us vs them mentality so many people now have, between police and civilians.



posted on Aug, 13 2014 @ 09:02 AM
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a reply to: MarlinGrace

I feel the same about the citizens I serve.

I always encourage them to exercise their birth right of self defense.

Upstanding armed citizens make society safer and my job easier.



posted on Aug, 13 2014 @ 09:07 AM
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a reply to: BasementWarriorKryptonite

The funny thing is the 'us vs them' mentaility is coming from both the police and the citizens. It is a viscious cycle.

Take myself for example, although I do not view things as the police (me) vs the citizens (them) I am almost forced by the citizens to view things that way.

I am constantly criticized, insulted, demonized and threatened with violence simply because of my job. I have been told on many occassions that when SHTF I will be a target because I am cop.

Is that fair? I have never harmed or wronged anyone in my duties. I try to better my community on a daily basis yet I am told (and I believe) that myself and my family will be a target.

I am being forced into a corner. How am I NOT to view things as the police (me) vs the citizens (them)?



posted on Aug, 13 2014 @ 09:19 AM
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a reply to: TorqueyThePig

I can imagine what that must be like, but I've never been in the position to know what it is like for you. Here's the thing, though. It isn't the job of ordinary, law-abiding citizens to make you feel warm and loved. It should simply be understood that your job is respected and appreciated.

Now, when someone like me is harassed by a cop and then another, then another lies to you and another lies about you - well, I think you get the drift of exactly how much love I have for 'law enforcement'. In these times, people are also beginning to questions the law itself. Half of the crap you are expected to enforce is not only completely idiotic and wrong, but is actively harming society - drug law enforcement as an example.

On top of that, take into account the perception that police are government shills, looking after revenue and not the people.

It's likely that you and I live in different styles of society, so what your everyday life is like is probably different to mine, but I do know that it's the job of police to take the high road. I'll smoke my joint and curse and break minor laws that I don't agree with - I'm sure you neither mind nor give a damn - but it's your job to ensure that I feel safe and secure and that I trust you enough to call you for help, if it's really needed.

There are probably such easy ways for local law enforcement to get back in the good books. How about more community involvement - a bbq? Sports days where you can play against or with cops. That sounds awesome to me.



posted on Aug, 13 2014 @ 09:40 AM
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a reply to: BasementWarriorKryptonite

I don't need to feel warmed and loved.

I just don't want to be ostricized, criticized and most importantly physically threatned. From criminals I understand. It comes with the territory. But I don't want that from the law abiding citizens.

I agree that there are dumb laws on the books. It is my descretion to arrest someone who is in possession of a misdemeanor amount of a certain plant. That is something that I rarely do. If I do charge someone with it, it is because I found it on them after arresting them for breaking into a persons house or robbing someone.

As for traffic tickets I only write the most serious offenses. That can be proved by looking at how many warnings I write.

My department is involved in community policing. I am a member of the community oriented polcing team. We hold BBQ's which usually have low attendence by citizens. I volunteer every year to do shop with a cop. We also do the special olympics torch run. We preceed that with a tip a cop event where we the cops wait on people at a local restaurant and all tips go to the special olympics fund. We also organize neighborhood watch groups and community crime meetings.

We do our part quite well.

I am sorry that you have had bad experiences with the police. You didn't have them with me or my department though.

I mean I deal with bad situations and the criminal elements of society more so then I do with the good citizens. So needless to say my experiences with people in general are bad. Would it be okay for me to start judging every person I come across as a bad person or a criminal? Of course not.

I just wish others could extend that same courtesy to me the individual officer that is just a human being.
edit on 13-8-2014 by TorqueyThePig because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 13 2014 @ 09:45 AM
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a reply to: TorqueyThePig

It's difficult to treat an officer as an individual when they're in uniform, especially so we are to see them as one body.

I'd go to your bbq and good work on being one of the good ones.



posted on Aug, 13 2014 @ 10:00 AM
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a reply to: BasementWarriorKryptonite

Thank you.

Good luck.



posted on Aug, 13 2014 @ 10:22 AM
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a reply to: TorqueyThePig
Why is there a segment of the population who want to disarm or disband the police? When there is a shooting, they disregard all logic and blame the police immediately. They go on to riot and destroy businesses that support their communities. They do 90 mph in a 70 mph zone and get angry when ticketed. They want to sue when getting tazed not thinking what if the police used a gun. The bottom line is their bad behavior generates contact with the police. Most people don't understand this! Somewhere along the line people think that they are above the law and privileged. Contact with the police violates their privileged status and they resent it. I believe this attitude is why they want no guns or police for that matter.



posted on Aug, 13 2014 @ 10:32 AM
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a reply to: TorqueyThePig

Hook fired tasers have the ability to replace firearms in most non-firearm related life-threatening situations, which is most of the violent situations police encounter on a routine basis. The new electrolaser expands that further. In theory, someday, electrolasers could even be used by police snipers in an open air environment to take down a firearm wielding target allowing for capture and prosecution instead of immediate state execution.

Police departments might not like the idea that tasers shouldn't expand their capabilities to enforce routine things like crowd control and compliance issues, but that is the fact of the matter. It is immoral to shock someone and to cause extreme and unnecessary pain to their person simply because they are violating a civil matter. Also, we criminalize far too many things. If the state wants to issue a fine or citation for non-violent matters, that is sensible, but to criminalize non-violent behavior is insane.

Local cities are even criminalizing yard care now. These totalitarians should go tour North Korea and take a look first hand at what happens to a society when you wield the force of government more often than it needs to be, when you misapply the courts and police which should be reserved for justice, not code enforcement.



posted on Aug, 13 2014 @ 11:08 PM
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a reply to: TorqueyThePig
Unfortunately the problem with that is that in most cities, the Internal Affairs department is still associated with the police department and in many cases the officer who commits a crime, if it is not a federal crime, ends up with a lighter sentence than if it was someone who was not a law enforcement.

It is also, and has been documented, that to make a complaint about a particular officer, most officers usually end up giving the person making a complaint the run around, if not trying to bully them not to. And in some cases officers have been known to try to bully their way into any situation that they want, or have shown to violate the same laws that they are suppose to be enforcing, such as with traffic laws. And if it goes up the chain of command, those on the top rung are given many times the option to retire, and still get the pension and benefits.

So there is a bigger problem there. If the investigation portion for the police, the ones who police the police force were seperate and not associated with the police department, where it was not to protect the brother in blue, then it would make a difference.



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