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Wouldn't It Be More Prudent to Move East Across the Atlantic Than to the Southern Hemisphere?

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posted on Aug, 10 2014 @ 06:03 PM
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Wouldn't It Be More Prudent to Move East Across the Atlantic Than to the Southern Hemisphere?

The ecological factors and conditions that were relevant to this question came into play well before the Fukushima Daiichi disaster occurred. It's just that the Fukushima Daiichi disaster exacerbated and accelerated the situation markedly.

As a matter of fact, the Sunday Newark Star-Ledger ran a series of articles over a decade ago which, of course, was well before the Fukushima Daiichi disaster in 2011. Unfortunately, I was unable to retrieve a link to the articles; apparently they are too old to have been archived on the Net.

The subject of the Star-Ledger series was on the sorry state of the oceans' ill health and pollution, these leading to the ultimate death of our oceans. The series stressed that, while people believe that rain forests provide most of the world's oxygen, this is not true. The oceans produce over 50 percent of our oxygen.

Key players in the production of ocean-sourced oxygen are plankton, and the series at that time noted that ocean plankton populations were declining precipitously in the few years leading up to the publication of the series. The warning was dire: the world's oxygen supply was in peril, this not even factoring in something like Fukushima.

Then comes along the earthquake and tsunami that took out the four nuclear power plants at Fukushima Daiichi resulting in hundreds of tons or radioactive contaminated water being released into the Pacific Ocean, with this, as projected by many, ultimately and totally killing that ocean and, along with it, its oxygen-producing capacity.

Here's a recent relevant link to the suspected effect of Fukushima on the Pacific Ocean: “Far less plankton than normal… There are too many questions” .

Why, the world's oxygen supply's being imperiled was discussed right here at ATS in the "Fragile Earth" forum. See: How long before we all suffocate!

It's interesting that the above ATS thread was posted on July 17, 2012 which was almost two-and-one-half years after the Fukushima Daiichi disaster, yet no mention of the disaster and its effect on the Pacific Ocean was made in this thread. Interesting.

On the other hand, a Youtube contributor does make mention of the imperiled world oxygen supply in the context of the Fukushima Daiichi disaster, and he makes no bones about it in this video: HUMAN SUFFOCATION COMING. Radiation Killing Oxygen Supply. Thank Fukushima. .

At elapsed time of 5:35 into the video, this former paramedic for a fire department very emphatically says: "Anyway, suffocation, that's how we’re gonna die. Die, die die through suffocation."

Well, the numbers are a bit troubling. I once read that the oxygen level of the atmosphere of planet Earth at about the turn of the last century was roughly double what it is today which is about 20 to 21 percent of the air. An absolute minimum level of oxygen for human survival is about 15 to 16 percent of the air. With the oxygen-producing capacity of the world's largest ocean, the Pacific, being knocked out by the nuclear waste contamination from Fukushima Daiichi, the prognosis seems to be grim.

The paramedic in the Youtube video thinks that he is sitting pretty amidst the oxygen-rich, oxygen-producing rainforest of Costa Rica. He thinks that he will survive while the rest of us "die, die, die through suffocation."

Well, I see things a bit differently.

Costa Rica is near the narrowest point of Central America. So, how deep into a rainforest can this guy be? With the prevailing winds going from west to east, soon-to-be oxygen-deficient wind from over the vast, vast Pacific Ocean (much vaster than puny Costa Rica) is going to blow through Costa Rica and take with it oxygen-rich air right out of the Costa Rican rain forest and send it out to the Caribbean Sea. Too bad.

Moreover, this guy is in a rainforest, mind you. What happens in a rain forest? ANSWER: it rains! And after it rains, the wetness on the vast surface area of leaves and ground will evaporate creating H2O humidity to displace oxygen from already questionable air.

So, this paramedic guy recommends Costa Rica. He has land, lots and lots of land to sell. (I wonder what he's going to do for food if there is mass migration there, especially hordes from Mexico.)

Anyway, I think that it makes more sense to go east of the Atlantic Ocean, for in this way you can benefit from the oxygen produced by the Atlantic Ocean and carried by the prevailing west-to-east winds.

Indiscriminately moving to South America in the Southern Hemisphere is not such a hot idea because, as is the case in Costa Rica, this will put you to the east of the Pacific Ocean and its oxygen-deficient air. Africa would be a better bet, that is, east of the Atlantic Ocean. While being in South America may reduce your exposure to radiation from Fukushima, remember you can live for years while being exposed to radiation. However, without oxygen, you will "die, die, die" in a matter of minutes.

Better yet, maybe we should invade India, because there, you will not only be east of the oxygen-producing capacity of the Atlantic, you can be east of the oxygen-producing capacity of the Indian Ocean as well!

It was said, "The next war will be over water." I think not. Due to developments, the next war will be over oxygen.

Prepare for war with India.

P.M.




posted on Aug, 10 2014 @ 06:10 PM
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1: The air will dissipate evenly as it circulates the globe and decline at the same rate everywhere.

2: That being the case the only way "plants" will help is in a dense indoor environment where the air is trapped

3: Fukushima wont eradicate Oxygen supply except for short term, smaller life forms adapt and repopulate quickly



posted on Aug, 10 2014 @ 06:57 PM
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a reply to: theworldisnotenough

I'll never understand why the US and UN come to aid in war situations, but there isn't international cooperation to solve/contain this problem.

What are they actually doing now? Last I heard was the whole, frozen ground barrier, etc.



posted on Aug, 10 2014 @ 08:42 PM
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I wouldn't worry about japan until Obama stops taking vacations in Hawaii.



posted on Aug, 10 2014 @ 08:59 PM
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a reply to: theworldisnotenough

Millions of plastic microbeads from human products such as facial scrubs and toothpaste are killing the much touted planktons of the oceans (and even fresh water life) with negative consequences for marine life and ultimately humans that eat marine life. The microbeads fill the gut and makes the animal believe it is full. Sea birds all over the pacific have their craws full of plastic resulting in a slow sure death.. There is more than one thing killing the life in the seas...

I agree you would think the world would have come together long ago to develop a plan to stop the radiation spewing from Fuka .... But hey there is money to be made with the doctor/farma bills that are sure to follow.

edit on 10-8-2014 by 727Sky because: ..



posted on Aug, 11 2014 @ 03:01 AM
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originally posted by: Hoosierdaddy71
I wouldn't worry about japan until Obama stops taking vacations in Hawaii.


It was just reported in yesterday's Sunday newspaper, that Obama went off on a two-week golfing vacation on Martha's Vineyard. That's Massachusetts, right?



posted on Aug, 11 2014 @ 04:21 AM
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originally posted by: criticalhit
1: The air will dissipate evenly as it circulates the globe and decline at the same rate everywhere.

2: That being the case the only way "plants" will help is in a dense indoor environment where the air is trapped

3: Fukushima wont eradicate Oxygen supply except for short term, smaller life forms adapt and repopulate quickly



Thank you, criticalhit, for responding to my post.

However, your response raises more issues than it resolves.

You say, "That being the case the only way "plants" will help is in a dense indoor environment where the air is trapped."

Now, what do you mean by "dense indoor environment?" Do you mean a typical housing unit with twice as many houseplants as one might typically have, or do you mean that we all have to move into the Victorian-era glasshouse known as the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, the centerpiece of the New York Botanical Garden in the Bronx? Or, better yet, should we all move into the Biosphere in the middle of the desert?

You say: "Fukushima wont eradicate Oxygen supply except for short term, smaller life forms adapt and repopulate quickly."

What do you mean by "short term?" The situation of Fukushima's spewing contamination into the Pacific Ocean is projected to last 1,000 years or more. Will your idea of "short term" be long enough to "do in" the human population due to suffocation... or not?

This issue of short term impact on the oxygen supply raises the age-old principle of "the bigger they are, the sooner they fall."

Think about dinosaurs, and what I believe led to their demise.

But first I need to digress to a discussion of basic geometry.

You should know that if you increase the linear dimensions of an object, the surface area of the object, and even more so, the volume of the object will increase well out of proportion to the increase of the linear dimensions. The surface area increases proportionately to the square of the linear dimension, while the volume increases proportionately to the cube of the linear dimension.

To illustrate, take a toddler's cubical block, you know the one with alphabet letters on each side. You will need eight of those blocks to build a larger cube with only twice the linear dimensions while the surface area of the new, bigger block is now four times as much as the surface area of the first block. If you want to build an even larger cube with triple the linear dimensions, you will find that ratio of linear to surface area to volume will be: 3 units to 9 square units to 27 cubic units. In the case of the original cube (block), the ratio of surface area to volume is one to one; but with the triple-size cube, the ratio of surface area to volume is 9 to 27 – big, big difference!

This same analysis applies to the area of inner surfaces as well, meaning ones that have been turned outside-in like the interior surface area of oxygen-absorbing lung sacs: the larger the creature, the lower the ratio of oxygen absorbing capacity relative to the oxygen-carrying blood volume and the total volume of the creature.

Conclusion: bigger creatures need a higher concentration of oxygen in the air to compensate for the relative deficiency of the oxygen-absorbing capability of their lungs.

The dinosaur went extinct some 60,000,000 years ago while smaller pre-historic alligators, which have been around for over 200,000,000 years, did not because back then there was some event that impaired the oxygen levels of the atmosphere. Those levels declined below a minimal threshold and became inadequate for dinosaurs who had insufficient lung capacity due to their big size; they gasped for air, keeled over, and bit the dust. Meanwhile, the alligators survived as did tiny dinos with wings who had much better oxygen absorbing capacity while also possessing the ability to fly to greener, more oxygen-rich pastures as needed-be, and so they evolved into the birds of today.

It's a known fact that within species, including humans, smaller specimens have a greater life expectancy than the larger ones THIS IS BECAUSE THE SMALLER ONES CAN ABSORB AND, THEREFORE, PROCESS OXYGEN BETTER RELATIVE TO THEIR SIZE AND VOLUME.

So, during this supposed "short term" oxygen problem of which you speak, you may see your big guys like Brad Garrett, American Gladiators, and basketball players dropping like flies first while your puny little fellows are too lethargic to bury their dead. With this being the case, there will be decomposing bodies everywhere releasing the super-potent greenhouse gas known as methane. Boy, oh, boy will it ever get hot and stinky out there.

[Ha, you paramedic guy basking in Costa Rica! I bet you didn't take this into account. You say that global warming is a load of bull****, and anybody who buys into it is a jerk. Well, it's going to get hot, really hot south of the border there in Costa Rica, let me tell you.]

OK, OK, OK... let's say, for argument's sake, that this short term oxygen depletion problem does not do in any humans to any appreciable extent. Well, what about cattle?

Heads of cattle have a much larger body size and volume than humans. Maybe a slight decline in oxygen levels in the air will be enough to do in our livestock.

You can't raise cattle indoors in a greenhouse conservancy like the one in the Bronx. This would be tantamount to putting a bull into a china shop.

With all of this being the case, there won't be much beef to go around. This will put a major dent in the worldwide food supply, as if there wasn't already a big enough dent from losing the seafood of the Pacific Ocean. And with the loss of beef will be the loss of dairy. No more gelato for you, my friend.

And with a whole bunch of cattle lying around dead, dying and decomposing, the methane problem from this state of affairs will dwarf the methane that was previously released from the exhaust systems of those cattle. So, we are back to a very much aggravated greenhouse effect. Let me tell you: you just can't win.

Oh, the humanity.

Lastly, you say (actually firstly, you say): "The air will dissipate evenly as it circulates the globe and decline at the same rate everywhere."

Well, yeah, of course, eventually everything will mix up uniformly, but just as wind-pattern maps illustrate the uneven distribution of radionuclides from Fukushima, I'd imagine that oxygen levels in the air to the immediate east of the Atlantic would have to be greater than oxygen levels in the air to the immediate east of the Pacific... if and when it comes down to that.

P.M.



posted on Aug, 11 2014 @ 04:44 AM
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a reply to: theworldisnotenough

I'm talking about a sort of Green house environment in which you create a mostly secure atmosphere, by dense I mean dense with plants and not letting the oxygen escape. That's the only thing that would work.

The air moves quickly around the globe, and the oxygen in a scenario like this will deplete slowly far less time than it takes to circulate the Earth, it wouldn't matter at all where you are the decrease in oxygen would seem identical whatever % difference there was would be undetectable. Like water going down the drain of a bathtub, you might be loosing it down the drain but the tub goes down at equal measure.

Now... when I say it would be short... right now there are plants and bacteria etc, etc adapting to the radiation, given the vast number if for example every plankton in the Ocean (almost) died tomorrow the few that survived and started to populate would recover in as little as years... now obviously people can't live years w/o enough oxygen so many, many people aside from those of us in our Philodendron and vegetabe garden green houses will drop dead before that happens...

With "man" gone, plants will take over rapidly... our houses would be covered in 2-3 years our sky scrappers in 10... you mentioned Methane from the die off... a non entity, every cow that dies will produce Less greenhouse gasses rotting than a year of flatulence, contribute to soil replenishment and make a great environment for plants to grow... as the die off commences the amount of green house gas would drop dramatically... all while plants were producing more and more oxygen and adapted ocean micro organisms rebounded very quickly....

Plants won't die off from anything that goes on at Fukushima by itself, the only way there would be enough radiation would be if we didn't shut down the rest of the reactors as we died off and surely for the most part we would...

realistically it's a fairly survivable scenario with the right tools and preparation...

For the record by the way, the difference in air uptake and the in reality small discrepancy in size of our population, size wouldn't factor in much either the difference and time line between a 7 footer and five footer dying of oxygen deprivation wouldn't be that apparent, the reality is it would be a slow miserable death, lack of oxygen would lead to all sorts of bad conditions long before straight up lack of air actually killed anybody....

disease... disease would be the cause of 90% of deaths long before there was so little oxygen we'd suffocate or anything like that.



posted on Aug, 11 2014 @ 05:27 AM
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originally posted by: criticalhit
a reply to: theworldisnotenough

I'm talking about a sort of Green house environment in which you create a mostly secure atmosphere, by dense I mean dense with plants and not letting the oxygen escape. That's the only thing that would work.



So, how long will people survive in their greenhouses once they resort to eating all the greenery in there due to food shortages on the outside?

Never mind.

I want to know what you think of the dinosaurs' extinction. How is it that the big ones konked out while the small ones went on to evolve into birds? How is it that alligators survived the mass extinction event that the dinos could not survive?

You talk about bacteria evolving easily. This I don't dispute, but they are evolving for their own survival, not ours. New pathogens may be evolving that may not be survivable for us... in other words, superbugs for which we cannot prepare fast enough, yet you noted that the coming cataclysm is survivable with the right preparation. You, yourself, say that 90% will bite the dust due to disease, probably an optimistic estimate, before scarcity of oxygen does us in. It's known that radiation can do a real number on our own genes, yet little is said about what radiation is doing to the DNA of pathogens and how this may result in pandemics the nature of which have yet to be manifested.

BTW, we bury our own dead to prevent the spread of disease. What is being done to clean up the massive fish and other marine life die-offs of which I have heard subsequent to the Fukushima disaster? I'd imagine that if left to rot in the water and on the beaches, these die-offs can result in the spread of disease among land mammals not to mention further disease and die-offs of aquatic life.

P.M.
edit on 11-8-2014 by theworldisnotenough because: Added afterthought.



posted on Aug, 12 2014 @ 03:11 AM
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I'll just let myself die if that's what's gonna happen. Not gonna move to another continent on a whim or, even if it saves me, just so I can be one more human competing for oxygen food and water. Surviving isn't an obsession for me when the world is gonna be like that.
edit on 8/12/2014 by 3n19m470 because: if you guys are starving you can eat my body if you want



posted on Aug, 12 2014 @ 04:06 AM
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Our Troposphere is 30,000 ft to 56,000 ft, thats alot of air.

Carbon turns to carbon dioxide then photosynthesis turns it to oxygen, both on land and sea.

Airlines and jets would feel the effect if our atmosphere was shrinking. I guess mountain climbers and sky divers would notice no oxygen pretty quick.



posted on Aug, 12 2014 @ 05:38 AM
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a reply to: theworldisnotenough

You'd need a really extensive setup my friend.

If you had 15-20 people (i'm guesstimating) you would want something in the range of a 20 floor building

This building would have to have storm windows and a very extensive solar panel setup as it's roof, that power would be for the Electrolysis of water into Hydrogen and Oxygen and to power a machine that pulls water from the atmosphere... the plants alone wouldn't create enough oxygen given loss for a small group of people and some animals, you'd have no choice but to produce a fair amount of oxygen daily from water... fortunately there is currently an israeli company that makes such devices and they now come solar powered..

It would be a Multi Million dollar setup to be viable... done right a very large floor per person of the length and width of a typical apt building with large enough and strong airtight windows should suffice a years food for one person and maybe a couple of chickens and rabbits

There are a myriad number of ways to create such a setup... exacts would need to be designed but the power and water are mandatory and it's a lot of space per person, acres.


I don't know much about the post extinction period of the dinosaurs, I would however imagine the topic at hand, smaller, needed less oxygen played a big part. As for crocs? maybe just the dumb luck pf the sort of swampy environment they live in and being amphibious... there would have been a lot of Oxygen consumption with so much fire.

As for the rest... we don't leave dead creatures on our beaches, I wouldn't know the details and they are probably different by location for who cleans such things, but people do... carcass clean up and road kill removal i someones job...



posted on Aug, 12 2014 @ 06:17 AM
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Truthfully, I have studied the living crud out of how to build survival shelters for all sorts of conditions...

Realistically, i don't even remotely have the money for such scenarios mostly.

My honest methodology, I keep aware of the locations of suitable environments where I live and where the "toys" I need to put something together would be located and make temporary plans to "out live the bulk of people short term" and keep what I need to make it through the bulk of deaths so i can take what I need whilst walking over corpses...

I do NOT think this is a plausible scenario at this time (but it does make me think)

In this case, if I thought it was coming...

here is what i'd want on hand... that would be affordable and unnoticed...

1: Philodendrons, easy to cut and grow more... (I keep these now)

2: The smallest portable device for extracting water from the atmosphere, there is a solar powered back pack unit available that can do 20 gallons of fresh water per day, couple of grand (honestly on my rl shopping list atm)

3: a few portable solar panels, as many as you can store, the kind you can plug into your wall socket and power a small trailer with, enough for a small fridge a bit of light, LED bulbs 4-5 watts, and of course to create oxygen from the water you make daily... (have these already)

4: a location near a small body of water

and this...

5: human gills

This technology, is not at fruition yet but will be very soon, it allows one to extract oxygen directly from water, it's only limitation is battery charging time... in short with this and a small on shore solar setup and enough batteries for quite some time a person could feasibly just live underwater for a time emerging only to change batteries... it won't be brutally expensive...

some combo of the above, the ability to harvest powers from the sun, water from the air and oxygen from water... this would be in a years salary range at the 40 G ish mark... The concept of 20 gallons a day of water converted to air doesn't sound like much, but... if rigged properly to store into scuba gear for example and your basically living under water as per the gills, every couple of days you could refill airtanks, exit the water and traverse the area gathering more supplies...doing a bit of building making a better habitat over time from what the dead left behind...

all of it exists and at low prices, hopefully the gills will be ready soon... if for no other reason they are cool as hell and essentially turn you into Kevin Costner in water world lol


(thinking about it, a houseboat on a large lake would probably best on a po buckers budget)







edit on 12-8-2014 by criticalhit because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 12 2014 @ 06:46 AM
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originally posted by: criticalhit
a reply to: theworldisnotenough

You'd need a really extensive setup my friend.

If you had 15-20 people (i'm guesstimating) you would want something in the range of a 20 floor building


Are you thinking of something akin to billionaire Mukesh Ambani's billion dollar vertical mansion which just happens to have been built in, of all places, India, where, I postulated, the air would have a better oxygen content? (See it at Bing images: www.bing.com...)


...there would have been a lot of Oxygen consumption with so much fire.



Interesting point... which brings me to my next concern:

When oxygen in the air reaches critical levels, will the ghetto dwellers protest this by rioting and burning cities?

P.M.
edit on 12-8-2014 by theworldisnotenough because: Fixed messed up url and quote.



posted on Aug, 12 2014 @ 01:37 PM
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a reply to: theworldisnotenough

This is just nonsensical. This guy is claiming that radiation from Fukushima is going to kill all of the Phytoplankton that produces oxygen in the ocean? That is just wrong. Radiation effects the mechanisms in the cell responsible for division thats why you get cancer. Radiation sickness effects the fast dividing cells in the body like the stomach lining. Now a general rule is the simpler an organism the more resistant it is to radiation. Phytoplankton is a single celled organism, you can't get more simpler than that. In fact:



Unicellular organisms are more resistant: yeasts die under a dose of 30,000 R, amoebas 100,000 R, and infusoria withstand irradiation at a dose of 300,000 R

encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com...

Phytoplankton are a type of infusoria that is 300,000 R or ~2,800 Sv (1 Sv= ~107 R)
There aren't even that kind of levels on the sight at the power plant, This guy is just wrong no matter how much paramedic/ Fire training he has
edit on 12-8-2014 by BGTM90 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 12 2014 @ 02:04 PM
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a reply to: theworldisnotenough

We will run out of silly misleading scaremongering youtube videos many thousands of years before we run out of oxygen!

You would be better concerned about us running out of helium



posted on Aug, 12 2014 @ 05:19 PM
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Here's an excerpt from the answer to the ehow question, "What do phytoplankton eat?"


"Along with sunlight, water and carbon dioxide, phytoplankton require a variety of other nutrients from the water including nitrogen, phosphorous and iron. The most important are nitrogen and phosphorous which are essential to survival and reproduction."

So, it seems that phytoplankton, like all plant life, need fertilizer.

From where does it get this fertilizer?

I'd venture a guess that aquatic fertilizer comes from other aquatic life, probably like cow dung from cow whales and urea from bull piss from bull whales, and a whole lot of waste from other sea creatures.

If those other sea creatures are exterminated by radiation sickness, then so will go phytoplankton as an indirect consequence of Fukushima.


originally posted by: AndyMayhew
a reply to: theworldisnotenough

We will run out of silly misleading scaremongering youtube videos many thousands of years before we run out of oxygen!



Hmmmm, maybe I should give up reading the Sunday Newark Star-Ledger.

You know, very recently, in a different Sunday newspaper, there was a major article on the subject of the problem of plastic microbeads in the sea.




You would be better concerned about us running out of helium



WHAAAAATTT??? No gelato AND no party balloons?

P.M.



posted on Aug, 12 2014 @ 06:10 PM
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originally posted by: theworldisnotenough
Here's an excerpt from the answer to the ehow question, "What do phytoplankton eat?"


"Along with sunlight, water and carbon dioxide, phytoplankton require a variety of other nutrients from the water including nitrogen, phosphorous and iron. The most important are nitrogen and phosphorous which are essential to survival and reproduction."

So, it seems that phytoplankton, like all plant life, need fertilizer.

From where does it get this fertilizer?

I'd venture a guess that aquatic fertilizer comes from other aquatic life, probably like cow dung from cow whales and urea from bull piss from bull whales, and a whole lot of waste from other sea creatures.

If those other sea creatures are exterminated by radiation sickness, then so will go phytoplankton as an indirect consequence of Fukushima.


originally posted by: AndyMayhew
a reply to: theworldisnotenough

We will run out of silly misleading scaremongering youtube videos many thousands of years before we run out of oxygen!



Hmmmm, maybe I should give up reading the Sunday Newark Star-Ledger.

You know, very recently, in a different Sunday newspaper, there was a major article on the subject of the problem of plastic microbeads in the sea.




You would be better concerned about us running out of helium



WHAAAAATTT??? No gelato AND no party balloons?

P.M.


Your logic is flawed how do you think theses plankton and other microbes survived before there was complex life? You know the earth started out with very little free oxygen and microbes converted C02 to oxygen long before there was complex life. And Heilium is used for much more than party balloons. But those are the main reason we are starting to run out.



posted on Aug, 12 2014 @ 06:25 PM
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originally posted by: BGTM90

originally posted by: theworldisnotenough
Here's an excerpt from the answer to the ehow question, "What do phytoplankton eat?"


"Along with sunlight, water and carbon dioxide, phytoplankton require a variety of other nutrients from the water including nitrogen, phosphorous and iron. The most important are nitrogen and phosphorous which are essential to survival and reproduction."

So, it seems that phytoplankton, like all plant life, need fertilizer.

From where does it get this fertilizer?

I'd venture a guess that aquatic fertilizer comes from other aquatic life, probably like cow dung from cow whales and urea from bull piss from bull whales, and a whole lot of waste from other sea creatures.

If those other sea creatures are exterminated by radiation sickness, then so will go phytoplankton as an indirect consequence of Fukushima.


originally posted by: AndyMayhew
a reply to: theworldisnotenough

We will run out of silly misleading scaremongering youtube videos many thousands of years before we run out of oxygen!



Hmmmm, maybe I should give up reading the Sunday Newark Star-Ledger.

You know, very recently, in a different Sunday newspaper, there was a major article on the subject of the problem of plastic microbeads in the sea.




You would be better concerned about us running out of helium



WHAAAAATTT??? No gelato AND no party balloons?

P.M.


Your logic is flawed how do you think theses plankton and other microbes survived before there was complex life? You know the earth started out with very little free oxygen and microbes converted C02 to oxygen long before there was complex life. And Heilium is used for much more than party balloons. But those are the main reason we are starting to run out.


CALLING ALL BIG SHOT EXPERTS:

Which came first: the chicken, the egg, or the bull crap... the bull whale crap, that is?

P.M.



posted on Aug, 13 2014 @ 02:40 AM
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originally posted by: theworldisnotenough

originally posted by: BGTM90

originally posted by: theworldisnotenough
Here's an excerpt from the answer to the ehow question, "What do phytoplankton eat?"


"Along with sunlight, water and carbon dioxide, phytoplankton require a variety of other nutrients from the water including nitrogen, phosphorous and iron. The most important are nitrogen and phosphorous which are essential to survival and reproduction."

So, it seems that phytoplankton, like all plant life, need fertilizer.

From where does it get this fertilizer?

I'd venture a guess that aquatic fertilizer comes from other aquatic life, probably like cow dung from cow whales and urea from bull piss from bull whales, and a whole lot of waste from other sea creatures.

If those other sea creatures are exterminated by radiation sickness, then so will go phytoplankton as an indirect consequence of Fukushima.


originally posted by: AndyMayhew
a reply to: theworldisnotenough

We will run out of silly misleading scaremongering youtube videos many thousands of years before we run out of oxygen!



Hmmmm, maybe I should give up reading the Sunday Newark Star-Ledger.

You know, very recently, in a different Sunday newspaper, there was a major article on the subject of the problem of plastic microbeads in the sea.




You would be better concerned about us running out of helium



WHAAAAATTT??? No gelato AND no party balloons?

P.M.


Your logic is flawed how do you think theses plankton and other microbes survived before there was complex life? You know the earth started out with very little free oxygen and microbes converted C02 to oxygen long before there was complex life. And Heilium is used for much more than party balloons. But those are the main reason we are starting to run out.


CALLING ALL BIG SHOT EXPERTS:

Which came first: the chicken, the egg, or the bull crap... the bull whale crap, that is?

P.M.


I'm sorry I don't understand nonsensical babble. Maybe you can rephrase that with sentences and explain how it relates to my previous post.






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