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Supermoon On August 10 Will Be Biggest Of 2014

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posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 07:16 AM
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www.huffingtonpost.com...

from link..How spectacular will this supermoon be?

In comparison to other full moons, supermoons can be up to 14 percent closer and 30 percent brighter, according to NASA. In addition, the August 2014 supermoon will become full during the same hour that the moon comes closest to the Earth (lunar perigee), meaning it will outshine other full moons that have fallen on the same day as the lunar perigee.
The August supermoon may also pair nicely with the Perseid meteor shower, which should be visible this weekend when Earth passes through the debris zone left by Comet Swift–Tuttle. The Perseids, which may offer skywatchers a view of 100 shooting stars per hour, will peak between Aug. 10 and Aug. 13.

I hate to always post bad news type stuff so i try 2 post some other stuff as well. So all you sky watchers here you go in case you were not aware..not much else to add enjoy the view 2 night




posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 07:33 AM
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a reply to: switchqm8
Good news s&f.



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 07:43 AM
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S&F

Thanks for letting us know.........................I'd have missed that otherwise

Respect
Cody



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 07:50 AM
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I observed one a few years ago, and was pretty disappointed by the size hype that was barely discernible with the eye. I got nice moon photos, though. This year's previous SM was also a visual 'meh', IIR.

I'm sorry, I don't mean to rain on the parade here. I'm just really tired of the "super" moon circus when it repeatedly turns out to be barely noticeable to the naked eye, if at all. Also, I've drawn the short straw on every single meteor shower of the past year and a half as well (rained out, overcast, full moon, etc) I'm a bit cranky over the lousy luck.

I need a super is what I need



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 08:03 AM
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originally posted by: Nyiah
I observed one a few years ago, and was pretty disappointed by the size hype that was barely discernible with the eye. I got nice moon photos, though. This year's previous SM was also a visual 'meh', IIR.

I'm sorry, I don't mean to rain on the parade here. I'm just really tired of the "super" moon circus when it repeatedly turns out to be barely noticeable to the naked eye, if at all. Also, I've drawn the short straw on every single meteor shower of the past year and a half as well (rained out, overcast, full moon, etc) I'm a bit cranky over the lousy luck.

I need a super is what I need


You have to observe it as it rises over the horizon, this is when it is at it's visually largest. Only lasts for about five to ten minutes and then looks like every other full moon.



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 08:13 AM
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a reply to: Nyiah
I agree, the few times I've evr been super-wowed by the moon include Glastonbury Festival 1997, but that was for a completely different reason to be honest. I've always thought "super moon" is an overly dramatic description for this pretty common and barely noticeable event, even when I've been out in the mountains with zero light pollution.



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 08:16 AM
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can't wait..



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 08:18 AM
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a reply to: subtopia
Same effect with any other moon at horizon as far as I've ever seen though isn't it?
I've never noticed it was in any way 'super' compared to 'non super' moons while experiencing that optical effect myself.


edit on 9-8-2014 by grainofsand because: Typo



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 09:22 AM
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originally posted by: grainofsand
a reply to: subtopia
Same effect with any other moon at horizon as far as I've ever seen though isn't it?
I've never noticed it was in any way 'super' compared to 'non super' moons while experiencing that optical effect myself.



How big do you want it to be?

I'm happy with twice the size than normal...



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 09:37 AM
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a reply to: subtopia
Yep, but it isn't twice the size of normal just because it's a 'supermoon' is it?
The optical effect at horizon has never been visually more impressive than any 'non super' moons I've watched under the same conditions. Or are you really saying you see a double sized moon under such atmospheric conditions only when it's a supermoon...compared to other full moons, really?



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 10:01 AM
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a reply to: grainofsand
what I'm saying is when the moon is physically closer to earth and at this time you watch it rise above the horizon it appears much bigger, nearly twice the size than when the moon is at it's furthest distance from earth.

The technical name is the perigee-syzygy, last one was on the July 12, 2014 and here in Australia it looked awesome.



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 10:28 AM
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i just wish they would give details on exactly where these types of things can be viewed. i'm halfway around the world, will it be the same here? and what day, the same day, the day before, the day after (12 or 13 hours ahead of eastern time depending on daylight savings time there)?



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 10:39 AM
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a reply to: generik

One day before or after full moon makes very little difference.

Just google for time of moonrise at your location. Today, tomorrow, doesn't matter.



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 10:49 AM
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a reply to: subtopia
Wow, must be something unique to your experience then, it appears that these sky geeks agree with me though:

www.skyandtelescope.com...


Go out on the evening of the 10th, and if you didn’t know in advance, you’d be hard pressed to tell whether this was a supermoon or the ordinary meh kind. It will appear just under 8% larger than the average full Moon, and about 15% larger than the “minimoon” at apogee. The difference is discernable in a side-by-side comparison like the one at right, but a glance up at the night sky isn’t going to bowl anyone over.



Media outlets advise their audiences to admire the supermoon when it’s just above the horizon, because that’s when it will appear the most augmented. In reality, you’re actually 4,000 miles (Earth’s radius) farther from the Moon when it’s on your horizon than when it’s overhead, an extra distance of about 1.6%. Nevertheless, the Moon looks bigger when it’s low due to the famous Moon Illusion.


If you don't like the link above and still disagree, just shout and I'll hunt down some published papers.
Yes it appears bigger, but it ain't that impressive to me when you take the 'normal everyday' moon illusion out of it.



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 10:56 AM
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a reply to: grainofsand

I concede my friend, it obviously takes a lot to impress you, glad you weren't with me in Cairns when the full eclipse occurred you may have spoiled my couple of minutes of fun frolicking in the dark.

1:54 am, off to catch some ZZZZZZzzzzzzzzz.




posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 11:39 AM
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a reply to: switchqm8

Moon is going to crash into us. That's why all the weird migratory animal die offs, that's why all the bees are dying, that's why we had the mega-quake in japan. That's the real cause of global warming, the tidal forces of the moon have changed the seasons, air and ocean currents.

It's prophecy....





sincerely,

The boy who cried wolf.
edit on 9-8-2014 by Hijinx because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 11:46 AM
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a reply to: Nyiah

You must live in georgia also...
Bad weather has shut down and visual I might have hoped for.



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 11:59 AM
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Hey now! I have seen a SUPER moon. I think Alaska may be a good moon viewing place during the winter months.

I have seen that thing looking so orange and freakishly huge, definitely super, and out of the ordinary. I thought it was called a harvest moon though. I like super, it seems everything has a super or a mega version these days.




edit on 9-8-2014 by GoShredAK because: Dumb



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 12:03 PM
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A supermoon is best appreciated when rising above the horizon. An enormous, bright yellow orb that makes it look like a scene from a science fiction book or film.



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 02:26 PM
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originally posted by: Nyiah
I observed one a few years ago, and was pretty disappointed by the size hype that was barely discernible with the eye. I got nice moon photos, though. This year's previous SM was also a visual 'meh', IIR.

I'm sorry, I don't mean to rain on the parade here. I'm just really tired of the "super" moon circus when it repeatedly turns out to be barely noticeable to the naked eye, if at all. Also, I've drawn the short straw on every single meteor shower of the past year and a half as well (rained out, overcast, full moon, etc) I'm a bit cranky over the lousy luck.

I need a super is what I need


You fare considerably better than a blind person........is maybe one way to 'accept' your lot ............Geez size queen or what ???????? ** cue sniggly laughter **



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