It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

No Exit: Dementia Village Dwellers Live in Alternate Reality

page: 1
35

log in

join
share:
+16 more 
posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 12:56 AM
link   
Sorry the headline seems a little sensational but I thought the article was interesting. I've never heard of this place.

weburbanist.com...


It sounds like the dystopian plot of Dark City or The Truman Show, with free-seeming residents unaware they are actually inhabitants of a closed community they cannot leave and in which they are under constant surveillance … but that is only one side of the story.

A total of 150 Alzheimer’s sufferers live in Hogewey, this gated community unlike any other. Located in the Netherlands, it boasts open copious walking paths and green spaces, a grocery shop, hair salon and dozens of stores and clubs.

The friendly grocers and stylists are, however, all employees of the facility (caregivers, doctors and nurses). If someone approaches the single exit to the outside world they are politely, gently but firmly told to perhaps try another door as this one is closed.




It reminds me a bit of that old tv series The Prisoner. But, it seems like a good idea for Alzheimer's patients definitely nicer than some care facilities I've seen and it sounds like the patients there do a lot better than at some places.
edit on 9-8-2014 by dug88 because: to add link



+11 more 
posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 01:04 AM
link   
I think it's pretty awesome myself. If anyone has ever seen a loved one virtually disappear into themselves they know how hard it is. The only good thing about that, is that most of the ones suffering form Alzheimer's really don't know. It kills the family members but the patients really don't know what is going on, so they don't hurt the same way the family does.

When one has Alzheimer's a lot of the time they are put in nursing homes for their safety, lack of family, etc. they usually share a tiny room with other people suffering from the same thing. They rarely get to do more than roam the short hallways of these homes. To have a place this large where they can continue as much of a life as they possibly can is awesome for lack of a better word. They get to interact with others more, they get more freedom, and that in turn makes the time they have left feel a little less like a jail.

I wish there were more places like this for Alzheimer's patients.

edit on 8/9/2014 by Kangaruex4Ewe because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 04:56 AM
link   
I think it's a great idea. It's like Disneyland for Alzheimer's patients, so to speak.
Main Street USA.

Can't remember where I heard the quote but it always made me feel better,

"Alzheimer's is great!"
"Why?"
"Because it's the only disease you can forget you have."



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 05:55 AM
link   
a reply to: dug88

Thanks for posting this!
Now this is a sign of a progressive world---

Beats the crap out of those huge new facilities popping up everywhere-- starting at 3 grand/mo and they justify the price by 3 square meals a day and you're still left to sit.

The idea of community as you presented - this retains dignity and respect, with the right care.
This has retained some faith in humanity, this thread.




+7 more 
posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 06:28 AM
link   
I moved my grandma into my house 2 years ago because of dementia and recently its got really bad she thinks shes 16 and needs to find her parents and i try to be supportive of her while reminding her shes 89 and im 24 and her parents died before i was born. Its really hard on anybody taking care of some one with dementia and i think i do a great job because I feel so much empathy for her because she must be so scared not knowing where, who, or how old she is so i make her feel comfortable and try and keep her busy with conversation or helping me cook/clean because when she feels like she is a working part of the house shes better but when she sits alone in her favorite chair she really looses herself. I really wish i had a place like this community to send her because i think she would like the "real life routine" not the, "hey grandma its time to eat, or hey time for bed." I personally think this idea is great and more nations should adopt this. Sorry for spilling the beans but i needed to talk about it because i never really get the chance ( sorry for bad grammar its late and im to tired to go back and correct my fast typing mistakes).



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 07:40 AM
link   
7a reply to: dug88

Wow thats amazing, I agree with poster above another sign of a progresive world near amsterdam you say? I can think of another thing they've got going right there aswell...



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 07:45 AM
link   
a reply to: LibertyPD32

Thats a really great thing of you to do, I honestly dont think I could cope with that it was bad enough when my grandma had a stroke, she has passed now god rest her soul, I can image what your going through right now you truly are an amazing person! Keep up the good work you'll be bagging yourself a hell of a lot of good karma to come for all your love time effort and kindness I am sure



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 07:51 AM
link   
a reply to: dug88

I guess this place really does operate on the principle that ignorance is bliss. To be honest our reality is not that different considering there are many a door metaphorically speaking or otherwise that the average Joe would be turned away from.

edit on 9-8-2014 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 08:24 AM
link   
This is an awesome idea. I imagine it would be very expensive, but no cost is too high to care for dementia and alzheimers sufferers.



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 08:32 AM
link   
Done before at least once - but well worth revisiting. Kinda reminds me of Planet Earth.

Dementia Village...Where People Have Dementia – And Fun!








edit on 9/8/14 by soficrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 08:48 AM
link   
Damn if you can watch that with a dry eye you're a bigger man than me.



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 10:50 AM
link   

originally posted by: LibertyPD32
I moved my grandma into my house 2 years ago because of dementia and recently its got really bad she thinks shes 16 and needs to find her parents and i try to be supportive of her while reminding her shes 89 and im 24 and her parents died before i was born. Its really hard on anybody taking care of some one with dementia and i think i do a great job because I feel so much empathy for her because she must be so scared not knowing where, who, or how old she is so i make her feel comfortable and try and keep her busy with conversation or helping me cook/clean because when she feels like she is a working part of the house shes better but when she sits alone in her favorite chair she really looses herself. I really wish i had a place like this community to send her because i think she would like the "real life routine" not the, "hey grandma its time to eat, or hey time for bed." I personally think this idea is great and more nations should adopt this. Sorry for spilling the beans but i needed to talk about it because i never really get the chance ( sorry for bad grammar its late and im to tired to go back and correct my fast typing mistakes).


You are such an amazing granddaughter - what a blessing you are to your grandma. Thank you for taking such good care of your grandma, I'm sure the task is difficult on many different levels. I hope you are able to get some support for yourself as well - you DO need to a have a place to talk about it! (((HUGS))) I don't even know you, but I feel so proud of you.



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 10:58 AM
link   
That is FABULOUS!!

What a wonderful idea. I lost my dad 4 years ago - he had dementia spells toward the end; but he stayed at home, and Mom took care of him (with my help as backup). If Mom starts to "go", I can't think of a better idea than this except having her at home with me. (Or rather, me being at her home, with her.)

Thanks so much for showing a success story of socialized health care. Compassionate, empathetic, respectful, and dignified.

Another
from me.

THANKS! S/F



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 10:59 AM
link   
a reply to: GreyGoo


Damn if you can watch that with a dry eye you're a bigger man than me.

Naw....
I was laughing and felt like dancing to know such a wonderful facility exists!!

It's FABULOUS!



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 01:32 PM
link   
It's great to see compassion alive and thriving. A rare trait these days it would seem.

I can say from first hand experience (mom had 2 massive strokes about 10 years ago...) that dementia is one of the most difficult things to deal with, but in the end it can be quite rewarding and revealing on a level that no word can currently describe. It takes a special kind of person to do the work this establishment is doing, and I can only hope the idea spreads like wildfire.

originally posted by: GreyGoo
Damn if you can watch that with a dry eye you're a bigger man than me.

I have to respectfully disagree, GreyGoo. It takes a high degree of manliness to embrace your emotions, the idea that "men don't cry" is just something the less manly lean on when confused by those emotions



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 02:51 PM
link   


originally posted by: GreyGoo
Damn if you can watch that with a dry eye you're a bigger man than me.

I have to respectfully disagree, GreyGoo. It takes a high degree of manliness to embrace your emotions, the idea that "men don't cry" is just something the less manly lean on when confused by those emotions


I completely agree with you here, I kinda meant it as a figure of speech. I get all emotional at the slightest of things lol even things that should make me happy such as acts of random kindness and such. I dunno but it's not a sad kinda emotional but more of an overwhelming emphatic feeling. Like you I don't think it's anything to be ashamed of no matter what your sex.



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 05:47 PM
link   
Thank you, my Father died of early onset Alzheimer.s He was a retired Chaplain and then Pastor who choose his own nursing home when he learned he had Alzheimers. His home was good as far as American type. But it was definitely not living. This is living. I only pray this model comes to the US. If I had the money, I'd build one.

I constantly worry, will I too get it? What will my quality of life be? Horrid in American conditions right now, like living full time in a hospital. The setting with the uniforms causes the workers to feel they are caretakers. The one in the video showed workers in real clothing, treating the residents like friends or family, so much better, so much more humane.






edit on 9-8-2014 by grandmakdw because: spelling



posted on Aug, 10 2014 @ 12:35 PM
link   
a reply to: grandmakdw


I only pray this model comes to the US. If I had the money, I'd build one.

I constantly worry, will I too get it? What will my quality of life be? Horrid in American conditions right now, like living full time in a hospital. The setting with the uniforms causes the workers to feel they are caretakers. The one in the video showed workers in real clothing, treating the residents like friends or family, so much better, so much more humane.


And guess what? It's Dutch. They have socialized health care. NONE of the residents at that village have to pay to live there.

Did you notice the director saying how they get the SAME budget as every other elder-care facility - they just decided to do it differently, more humanely, with more compassion and FREEDOM for the residents. If this model "comes to the US" as a "privately held" facility - only the super rich will get to live there. Are you super rich?

I'm not.

Would I want to live there if I had advanced dementia? Or for my family members to have access to it? Yes.

edit on 8/10/2014 by BuzzyWigs because: (no reason given)



new topics

top topics



 
35

log in

join