Who’s Funding the Anti-pot Movement? Private Prisons,Prison Guards,Police and Alcohol,Big Pharma

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posted on Aug, 8 2014 @ 12:49 AM
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Good article that puts into perspective why pot is still not legal in most of the country even though the vast majority of Americans would like to see it legalized.

Major industries in America oppose legalization because it will affect their bottom line.

Private prisons need to keep their jail cells full, and the guards that run them need to keep their jobs.

Law enforcement needs the war on drugs so they can get federal funding and the municipalities will receive less money from property seized in drug raids.

of course the beer and wine industry wants it illegal because they are afraid people might choose to smoke pot if its legal instead of buying that 12 pack of bud.

Maybe the biggest player of them all "Big Pharma" is fighting tooth and nail to keep it illegal or some people might not buy their ridiculously overpriced pain meds.

And since anyone can grow weed Big Pharma stands to lose a lot of it is legalized.


Legalized marijuana may have taken root in Colorado and Washington, but that doesn’t mean it has to spread to other parts of the country, as far as a bevy of special interests are concerned.

Some of the most lucrative and powerful industries in America oppose marijuana decriminalization because it threatens their financial bottom-line or jobs for their workers. Five different interest groups form the backbone of the anti-pot campaign, according to OpenSecrets.org, which tracks political spending.


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It has been shown in poll after poll that the majority of Americans want it legalized, but these industries have a lot of money and power and don't want lose a dime.
edit on 8-8-2014 by alienjuggalo because: (no reason given)
edit on 8-8-2014 by alienjuggalo because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 8 2014 @ 12:52 AM
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Fortunately, they are losing the battle. Medical will be in all 50 states soon enough. After that legalization - I just pray it is never federally legalized. They will regulate it to death and defeat the entire purpose....The feds should never even see a single penny of tax dollars from marijuana. That's how they wanted it, right?


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posted on Aug, 8 2014 @ 12:54 AM
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This has been the case since Harry J Anslinger in 1936.......You think the Authors just figured it out......can the public be far behind........I think everyone who favours total legalization already understands who is holding things up.......
Believe me when I say.....Leaglisation would alter the fabric of our society and bring the NWO to its knees....
Why you ask....because its a de programming substance.....plain and simple...


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posted on Aug, 8 2014 @ 01:00 AM
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You forgot to mention the threat industrial hemp poses to the paper pulp, textile, and synthetic plastics industries.
If it were legal to grow hemp it would kick a huge dent in their profits.



posted on Aug, 8 2014 @ 01:04 AM
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a reply to: skunkape23
The smarter ones with any vision will adapt and incorporatete it.
The drug war like any war is big business.



posted on Aug, 8 2014 @ 01:09 AM
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a reply to: skunkape23

I did not even consider those industries, but you would think legalization might create more jobs in those industries.

Big Pharma also stands to lose because so many people wont need psychological meds or anti depressants .



posted on Aug, 8 2014 @ 01:34 AM
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On the other hand....other jobs will be needed to fill the changing shape of the new meconomy..sic
True the prison guards will loose out, but we could send them to jobs in the new farming,textile,paper,and service industries...



posted on Aug, 8 2014 @ 01:56 AM
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Prisons are a vast, mountainous, booming business and prohibition just keeps their good times rolling. It is past time for legalization.




From Vox

Twitter and Reddit user @MetricMaps has developed a GIF that shows the steady rise of America’s state and federal prison population from 1978 to 2012. The map shows that the South — and Nevada — were leaders in increasing incarceration, but that most of the rest of the country has followed.

Incarceration rates are mostly due to government policies, not to crime rates — that’s true at the national level, and it’s true for differences between states as well. And because most of the US prison population is housed in state prisons, state laws, in particular, are the biggest factor in the rise of mass incarceration — and differences between similar states can be explained by differences in their laws.



Prohibition can't end soon enough.
source

I shared this gif in another related thread but found it appropriate to the OP's points here especially. Prohibition policies are a contributing factor in keeping otherwise law-abiding citizens in chains to the bloated and socially destructive penal systems.

Good points OP. Thanks!



posted on Aug, 8 2014 @ 02:03 AM
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all of them!



posted on Aug, 8 2014 @ 09:14 AM
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originally posted by: stirling

Why you ask....because its a de programming substance.....plain and simple...


Great point, that's why Nixon had to declare war on it and psychedelics, they were scared of losing the sheeple's hearts and minds.

I don't understand the idea that the alcohol industry is worried about losing market share, everyone knows that weed and a good IPA is a match made in heaven.



posted on Aug, 8 2014 @ 12:35 PM
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originally posted by: skunkape23
You forgot to mention the threat industrial hemp poses to the paper pulp, textile, and synthetic plastics industries.
If it were legal to grow hemp it would kick a huge dent in their profits.


But those industries could quickly retool and carry on business, albeit with a much smaller cost of raw materials.



posted on Aug, 8 2014 @ 03:41 PM
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I know that around here, the only reason I think that it still is illegal is that organized crime just makes too much money and that they have politicians in their pockets either with money or fear.

Same thing for prostitution and other drugs.



posted on Aug, 8 2014 @ 04:31 PM
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a reply to: kelbtalfenek
That would take substantial R+D, not to mention a lot of their machines will either have to be retooled, replace, or scrapped altogether. It would be a pricey and possibly risky process for them.



posted on Aug, 8 2014 @ 04:56 PM
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So strange. My friend, my wife and I just had this EXACT same conversation about five hours ago. It's a shame there are so many people willing to sacrifice the well-being of their fellow citizens for profit. Don't they know there's more to life than money?

Sometimes I don't know who to feel sorrier for - those who end up in prison for something as benign as marijuana, or the people who
go through their lives with the mindset that putting them in prison is the right thing to do. So many members of our culture are just morally and spiritually confused. Just a sad state of affairs.



posted on Aug, 8 2014 @ 05:54 PM
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originally posted by: 0rkoJoker

Sometimes I don't know who to feel sorrier for - those who end up in prison for something as benign as marijuana, or the people who go through their lives with the mindset that putting them in prison is the right thing to do. So many members of our culture are just morally and spiritually confused. Just a sad state of affairs.


The worst part is that there's a 3rd group who sits in the shadows laughing gleefully as one pawn "dutifully" imprisons another. Long term conditioning + short life spans = corruption; as high up the ladder you can climb.
edit on 8-8-2014 by Eunuchorn because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 12:25 AM
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weed was never prohibited in ancient civilizations.
the mummified man in the tekla makan desert was found with him sa small bag of it.
he dies 3000 years ago.

jews prohibited alcohol and followed by many civilizations even up till now.

in brasil when they confiscate shipments of co they dont destroy it they adde it to beverages. they even add a leaf to the coka cola. chewing it is allowed.

these stuff were prohibited in the seventies so people work.
now is different



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 07:20 AM
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originally posted by: TKDRL
a reply to: kelbtalfenek
That would take substantial R+D, not to mention a lot of their machines will either have to be retooled, replace, or scrapped altogether. It would be a pricey and possibly risky process for them.


Agreed. But they can still proceed with the industry. It may cost a lot in initial infrastructure investment, but with a less pulpy material and less processing involved (supposedly) then the business should resume, albeit with more of a profit percentage.



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 08:39 PM
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a reply to: kelbtalfenek
Yes, this is true. They could eat those costs without blinking an eye.



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 08:48 PM
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I think that is terrible. I know it is a business, but to hurt families and people, and put them in these places, that horrible things happen in, who knows what dark entities live there, waiting to jump inside you. Plus experiments and guards killing where there arent any cameras, raping, having sex with inmates, in some places testing drugs and sterilizing. That isnt human. Or is it.



posted on Aug, 10 2014 @ 03:32 AM
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they can make solyent green





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