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Ebola: Facts, Opinions, and Speculations.

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posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 08:55 PM
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Hmmm, it may sound bleak ikonoklast, but try to remain hopeful in the fact that hopefully, all 130 of those nations she mentioned put something into the cause, and maybe with the collective effort, it will be enough to at least stem the exponential trend we are currently seeing.




posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 09:46 PM
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a reply to: ikonoklast
thanks



posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 09:54 PM
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a reply to: clenz

The way i view it is you have 3 levels.

A world level
A country level
A personal level

At the moment the world level is not that great.
fts.unocha.org...

Not as many country's as you would think.

But then again how many people are investing on a personal level?
Probably 1%
edit on 20-9-2014 by joho99 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 20 2014 @ 10:05 PM
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a reply to: joho99
You're welcome.

ikon



posted on Sep, 21 2014 @ 12:55 AM
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a reply to: clenz

I hope so.

I found another interview with Laurie Garrett on the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) website. Whatever people may think about the CFR, they are definitely a strong influence at the least on the US government and the world, and she is their expert on Ebola.

It is well worth reading the entire article as a reality check on what can and cannot realistically be done Here are some key excerpts:


"The notion that we are going to build enough hospitals at the pace that we're going, to keep up with the spread, is absolute nonsense," Garrett says...

...Two weeks ago, the military and White House promised to erect a twenty-five-bed hospital in Monrovia, Liberia. It takes fifty to sixty days after funds are released to make [a hospital] operational, so even that very small facility will probably not be up and running until the end of October. The epidemic is currently doubling in size every ten to twenty days. You do the math: we currently have 5,000 recognized cases, and the assumption is what we see and count represents about a third of the reality, so we may have as many as 15,000 cases now, in two weeks that's 30,000. Two weeks after that it's 60,000. By the time the twenty-five-bed hospital is ready, it's 120,000. By the time the other seventeen hospitals are in place, it could be 200,000.


It's not possible to build hospitals or staff them fast enough to keep up with an epidemic doubling at this rate. But here is a somewhat interesting scheme from USAID:



...one fallback plan is the [U.S. Agency for International Development] scheme to distribute 400,000 home-care kits that contain latex gloves, masks, disinfectants, and soap... [Distributing home-care kits] is not going to stop the epidemic, but it's certainly going to lower the rate of spread...


USAID has long ties with the CIA, so this either tells you the real scope of the epidemic from the CIA's perspective or perhaps it tells you more, depending perhaps on your perspective on the CIA and the US government.

Then her recommendations, allegedly also the recommendations of Doctors Without Borders (MSF), get very Draconian:



We're not going to stop this unless we fundamentally get infected people away from the uninfected... [French NGO Doctors Without Borders (MSF)] has said, "We don't need a lot of fancy hospitals. What we need is to turn every single stadium and sports arena into a secure location that people cannot escape from, put cots in there, [provide] shade and protection from the rain, bring all the infected people into these spaces, and give them what little care we can."

...Everybody is having a hard time facing up to the fact that something that sounds so morally repugnant is going to have to be the way out of this.


She's right that this is morally repugnant, to say the least. This is how most sci-fi epidemic movies see things going, and who doesn't root for the hero escaping from the government roundup? Unfortunately she may also be right that it is the only option mentioned so far that could actually work. I'm not saying it's good. I'm just saying they are pretty much out of options other than this now, unless someone recommends the 'nuclear option.' Literally. Sci-Fi epidemic movies seem to often go that way too.

She has an interesting (and probably all too accurate) opinion on the possibility of a vaccine or treatment being available in time to halt the spread of this Ebola epidemic:



We've wasted a lot of time focusing on the possibility of a technological solution. It would be nice if in a year, two years, three years from now, we have a vaccine and we have some kind of viable, curative medicine. But we don't now, and we're not going to stop this technologically. As Americans, we tend to always want to find a quick fix that's technological, and we have a hard time with answers that involve boots on the ground and harsh public health solutions.


Asked about possibilities of Ebola mutating to become airborne, she says:



It would be a pretty profound leap in mutation. ...we know the virus has already made more than 300 mutations... However, most of the changes have made no difference... to its transmissibility...

I'm less worried about the virus becoming airborne than I am about it being able to outmaneuver any vaccine we throw at it...


Read the full article here:

SOURCE: CFR - Epic Failures Feeding Ebola Crisis



posted on Sep, 21 2014 @ 08:53 AM
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originally posted by: ikonoklast

She's right that this is morally repugnant, to say the least. This is how most sci-fi epidemic movies see things going, and who doesn't root for the hero escaping from the government roundup? Unfortunately she may also be right that it is the only option mentioned so far that could actually work. I'm not saying it's good. I'm just saying they are pretty much out of options other than this now, unless someone recommends the 'nuclear option.' Literally. Sci-Fi epidemic movies seem to often go that way too.


I don't see the problem. No one is suggesting to kill them on purpose, just isolate them and help with whatever is available. Half of them are going to die anyway, and if we can prevent possible hundred-thousands of additional casualties by isolating the few thousand cases we currently have it is the right thing to do.
The ones escaping on the other hand could become more of tracigal heroes this time, spreading the infection that could have been contained if they just stayed where they are.



posted on Sep, 24 2014 @ 11:30 AM
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Troops aiding Ebola effort in Africa have minimal chance of infection, USARAF chief says


The quote i found interesting by the U.S. Army Africa’s commander.


Williams stressed in the town hall meeting that the troops would be at extremely low risk of getting the virus because they would not be providing direct care to Ebola patients. Ebola is transmitted via direct contact, through broken skin or mucous membranes, with the blood, secretions, organs or other bodily fluids of infected people, and with contaminated surfaces and materials, according to the World Health Organization. The reality, Williams said, is that malaria poses a much greater risk for the troops.



We will be hearing variants on this quote in the coming months by many leaders so we should pay attention to how many of the 3000 catch ebola.



posted on Sep, 25 2014 @ 11:21 AM
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For those that haven't heard yet the WHO released new numbers last night ( September 24)
The number of cases has gone up to 6,263 and the deaths are up to 2,917.



posted on Sep, 25 2014 @ 02:10 PM
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originally posted by: MDpvc
For those that haven't heard yet the WHO released new numbers last night ( September 24)
The number of cases has gone up to 6,263 and the deaths are up to 2,917.


Just a quick heads up... I've updated the Ebola charts in the charts thread with this new data from WHO. Here is a link to the start of the updated charts:

Latest Ebola Charts



posted on Sep, 26 2014 @ 02:43 PM
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a reply to: ikonoklast

Thanks. ...New numbers: 3,091 deaths, 6,574 cases.


West Africa Ebola death toll passes 3,000 -WHO
DAKAR, Sept 26 Fri Sep 26, 2014 3:07pm EDT

The death toll from an outbreak of Ebola in West Africa has risen to at least 3,091 out of 6,574 probable, suspected and confirmed cases, the World Health Organisation said on Friday.



posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 06:49 PM
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a reply to: soficrow

Thanks, and you're welcome. I've updated the charts with the new numbers from WHO here:

Latest Ebola Charts



posted on Sep, 29 2014 @ 09:39 PM
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This is only a few hours drive from me:


DALLAS, TX -- A Dallas hospital says it is isolating a patient who is showing signs of having the Ebola virus.

Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas said in a statement Monday night that the patient's symptoms and travel history suggest the patient may have Ebola, the virus that has killed more than 3,000 people across West Africa.


DALLAS HOSPITAL MONITORING PATIENT FOR EBOLA



posted on Sep, 30 2014 @ 11:47 AM
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This is supposed to be reassuring, but somehow it's not:

CDC issues Ebola guidelines for U.S. funeral homes



posted on Sep, 30 2014 @ 11:55 AM
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a reply to: jadedANDcynical

There's breaking news that the CDC is sending a team to the hospital in Dallas.

Dallas News

I have not heard of the CDC doing this for other possible Ebola cases they were testing. Dallas authorities were in the middle of a conference call to the Department of Health & Human Services when HHS apparently cut the call off to take a call from the CDC about this. I'm guessing that says a lot, but we'll probably be hearing more soon.
edit on 30-9-2014 by ikonoklast because: edited a typo



posted on Sep, 30 2014 @ 01:16 PM
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a reply to: ikonoklast

That is definitely alarming, as the CDC was supposed to complete the test this morning...



posted on Sep, 30 2014 @ 01:41 PM
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a reply to: raymundoko

Yes, exactly. And now some news reports are have started saying they won't announce the results until tonight or tomorrow morning. Hopefully it is not Ebola, but I believe they have tested at least a dozen possible US cases previously and I have not seen announcements of mobilizing a CDC team in relation to the other tests.

I'm guessing it's likely the CDC has the test results already. It may be that they want to have the CDC team at the hospital in Dallas before they announce the results. The other possibility is maybe they always mobilize a team and have them ready to go, just in case, but this time the news leaked. We'll know more today or tomorrow, I guess.



posted on Sep, 30 2014 @ 05:28 PM
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Case confirmed.

The CDC is now organizing a "previous contact" list.

(Still reading....)



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 01:58 PM
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I just found out a good friend of mine is a surgeon at the hospital in question. I've texted him and will post his reply.

a reply to: Druid42



posted on Oct, 1 2014 @ 03:10 PM
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He replied that he's been working out of a hospital in Houston for about 2 weeks, so he isn't in the loop :-(

a reply to: raymundoko



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 12:37 AM
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I updated the Ebola charts with the newest data from the World Health Organization (WHO) published October 1, 2014 and which included data through September 28, 2014. I also added the confirmed case of Ebola in Dallas to the charts starting from the day that he became symptomatic according to the CDC (Sept. 24, 2014).

Here is a link >>> Latest Ebola Charts



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