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Ebola: Facts, Opinions, and Speculations.

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posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 11:06 AM
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a reply to: dollukka

What you wrote:


Marshal was having symptoms during a flight and he will be tested of Ebola and is quarantined in Houston.


What the article says:


The victim did not exhibit any signs of illness during the flight and was transported to a hospital upon landing for further testing. None of the testing conducted has indicated a danger to other passengers.

edit on 9-9-2014 by raymundoko because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 11:58 AM
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a reply to: raymundoko

I saw it in other source i cannot find anymore ( it was french ).. i was browsing what news had about this incident.
translation more about this Lagos airport robbery

Lagos airport: Ebola new weapon of Boko Haram?

A United States Air Marshal was quarantined in Houston yesterday after being attacked by a stranger at the airport in Lagos, Nigeria brandishing a syringe, reports ABC News. The attacker was able to inject an unknown substance in the back.

The Air Marshal was traveling with a team of other marshals when the attack took place in a non-secure area of the airport terminal in Lagos, officials said. He was able to board the United flight Airlines to Houston where he was greeted by FBI agents and health workers from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Fearing that the substance may contain some form of the Ebola virus, the Air Marshal was immediately quarantined. A spokesman for the FBI said the victim showed no signs of illness during the robbery and was taken to a hospital landing for further testing. While the unknown assailant fled and could not be found, we managed to locate the needle was placed on the same flight for tests in the United States. Lagos airport has long been considered as a possible target for terrorist group Boko Haram has carried out a series of deadly attacks across Nigeria. (Ia)

Source



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 12:14 PM
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a reply to: dollukka

I noticed that everywhere I read that article I see they call it a robbery...

So I researched it some and apparently injecting someone with sedatives is a normal form of public robbery in Nigeria...

Source


On his arrest, the pick-pocket explained that he was part of a new, country-wide syndicate of pick-pockets who use hypodermic syringes to inject powerful sedative drugs into oranges, apples, yogurt sachets, bagged "pure water" and sundry other food items, then, posing as motor-park food vendors, sell the drugged snacks to passengers of departing buses who consume the poisoned food as their vehicle departs the bus stop, and lapse into unconsciousness shortly thereafter.



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 01:08 PM
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a reply to: raymundoko

And

a reply to: raymundoko

You're making my case for me on these two posts, I know that the virus has not yet evolved to a point wherein it has developed a capsid sheathv(yet) and needs an initially liquid droplet of a minimum diameter.

I have also maintainesd that it has become more efficient at transmission that it had not been able to use as a vector and I think we are seeing evidence of that through the, now acknowledged, exponentially explosive growth we are being prepared to see.

Many posters here have been saying just that from near the beginning of the growth of this topic; one of the foremost being soficrow who has really done an excellent job of keeping abreast of the many faces of this growing calamity.

a reply to: raymundoko

That is from the abstract. There is much more than that to the actual paper, to whit:


Within this Article

· Introduction

· Ebola virus disease outside Africa

· Epidemiological clues

· Clinical findings suggestive of Ebola virus disease

· Laboratory abnormalities

· Differential diagnosis

· Conclusions

· References

· References


This looks to me to be a case study or do you think they're publishing instructions on how to do a case study?



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 02:11 PM
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Does anyone think that pictures of victims of the current outbreak look very different than past ones? I was just looking at historic photos of ebola victims and they are truly horrific, bleeding, pustules etc. and everything i've read says people die in a vomiting, bleeding mess as the virus seeks to find a new host. But I am struck by how , in recent photos of victims, people look like they were totally healthy up until they died, there's no blood anywhere,their clothes look clean, like they just dropped dead. It seems odd, but maybe the media is censoring the more disturbing photos if there are any.



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 03:20 PM
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a reply to: jadedANDcynical

Yes, it appears to be instructions on how to diagnose if a test is not readily available.



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 03:24 PM
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There are plenty of disturbing photos. Look for ones not in hospitals or care centers. There are literally recent pics of people dead in pools of their own vomit and feces.

a reply to: thuja



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 03:26 PM
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a reply to: jadedANDcynical

None of that is new though. They've always preached that type of protection when dealing with Ebola...



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 04:08 PM
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Fourth American aid worker with Ebola arrives at Atlanta hospital


I'm happy we can help these people but I feel we put our citizens at risk every time we bring an infected person into the country.

www.nydailynews.com...




The Ebola epidemic that has ravaged western Africa this summer is showing no signs of slowing down - and in fact, researchers say it's about to get a whole lot worse.

www.aol.com...



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 04:23 PM
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It's booming in west Africa because of the complete lack of medical and legit governmental infrastructure. We aren't at risk. Ebola is hard to spread, it's just spreading so well in these 3rd world countries because people aren't educated enough on the matter and the infrastructure isn't there to deal with it.

a reply to: quirkygirl



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 04:33 PM
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originally posted by: raymundoko
There are plenty of disturbing photos. Look for ones not in hospitals or care centers. There are literally recent pics of people dead in pools of their own vomit and feces.

a reply to: thuja


Links please?



posted on Sep, 9 2014 @ 05:53 PM
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a reply to: raymundoko

The keys to stopping it there are the same as the keys to stopping it here, or anywhere else for that matter:


Three core interventions have stopped every previous outbreak and can stop this one as well: exhaustive case and contact finding, effective response to patients and the community, and preventive interventions.


The outbreak has far outstripped any one country's ability to effectively deal with; it is quixkly growing beyond a united effort of all of the "first world."

When (not if, see below) this shows up in a 'first world' country, we will see how effective we are at contact tracing in our extremely interconnected world. I can see the federal government saying "see, aren't you glad the NSA traces everyone's movements and beveryone else they come into contact with through all of your metadata?"


Given the extensive mobility and air travel in West Africa, EVD could reach other countries in the region and beyond. Every day that disease transmission remains uncontrolled, the likelihood of spread to unaffected countries increases.

...

Each month, several thousand travelers from affected areas enter the United States, and even more people travel to and from Europe, other parts of Africa, and Asia. As long as Ebola is spreading in these regions, clinicians need to be alert to the possibility of EVD, take a travel history, and promptly isolate and test ill travelers who have returned from these regions in the past 21 days and have symptoms consistent with EVD.


As I said, when not if.

I keep seeing references to:


exit-screening protocols to help protect the rest of the world, including the United States.


What exit-screening do they have which would detect a pre-symptomatic patient that doesn't rely on honest answers to questions which are easily dodged?

If there is a means to identify patients before they are symptomatic, does that mean that the virus can be transmitted then as well?

If there is no way to identify a pre-symptomatic individual, then all 'exit-screening protocols' in the world are wastes of time and resources.

All quotes from:

Ebola 2014 — New Challenges, New Global Response and Responsibility

Pay attention to whom is the lead author.
edit on 9-9-2014 by jadedANDcynical because: typos, hate not having internet access on anything but my phone...


 



originally posted by: raymundoko
a reply to: jadedANDcynical

Yes, it appears to be instructions on how to diagnose if a test is not readily available.


Really?

You think physicians need instructions on how to do a case study?

Hmm.
edit on 9-9-2014 by jadedANDcynical because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 05:55 AM
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originally posted by: raymundoko
a reply to: MarkJS

Wow. Just because the doctors are waiting for it to burn out doesn't make them heroes?? They are there at the risk of their own lives to help those who are dying, and to try and prevent the spread of the disease. It is their work that usually helps it burn out so quickly. They also directly help people survive the disease who would not otherwise.

It looks like Obama is deploying soldiers to Africa. (why he doesn't send them to protect our southern border is another question, but off-topic).

Are the soldiers going to Africa to 'help with Ebola' heroes as well?



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 06:38 AM
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People thought it was bad taste when I posted a thread about becoming a zombie recently... but it was only after seeing the images of People with ebola that I thought of zombies.

dreadful things to see. As for the person requesting links to these images... that might infringe upon the T & Cs... best do your own searches.



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 06:39 AM
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a reply to: MarkJS

omg deploying soldiers there? Maybe he wants them to die?

terrible.

They should be placed in other areas to protect, quarantine etc...
Your right.

edit on CDT06uWed, 10 Sep 2014 06:41:10 -05004110am252 by Thurisaz because: add



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 12:29 PM
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Sierra Leone expects to uncover hundreds of hidden Ebola cases.


FREETOWN - Sierra Leone said on Wednesday it expected to uncover up to 20 percent more Ebola victims when it imposes a nationwide curfew designed to find sufferers who have yet to go to hospital. The government has announced the shutdown, with the population of six million confined to their homes except for essential business, for 72 hours starting from September 19. More than 20,000 volunteers will go door-to-door to track down people with Ebola and remove dead bodies, and take patients who have not yet gone to hospital into the care of medics. The government's Ebola emergency operation centre said 10 areas of the capital Freetown had been designated as "hot spots" charged with dealing with the surge in cases expected. "Isolation centres including schools equipped with beds will be set up as we envisage a five percent to 20 percent surge during the exercise, which is aimed at breaking the chain of transmission," Steven Ngaoja, head of the centre, told a news conference in Freetown. The Ebola outbreak has killed almost 2,300 people in four west African nations. Sierra Leone has reported some 500 deaths from almost 1,400 cases since it registered its first infection in May.


20 percent seems a bit conservative.



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 09:20 PM
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For those interested, I've updated the graphs in the Ebola charts thread with the data released by WHO that goes through September 6, 2014. There are a lot of charts, so they are split over 5 posts, but here is a link to the first of those posts:

Ebola charts

The other posts in the series of 5 follow immediately after that one.

When I first started doing the charts, I had data through August 4, 2014. At that time, according to WHO there were 1711 cases and there had been 932 deaths. As of September 6, 2014, according to WHO there have been 4293 cases and there have been 2296 cases. As I think most people know, even WHO has said that these numbers may only represent 25-50% of the actual numbers or less.



posted on Sep, 11 2014 @ 01:09 AM
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Something has been bugging me as I read through the Ebola threads on ATS. I don't recall seeing any ATS members posting and saying they live near any of the areas affected.

Maybe I missed something, but if not then that strikes me as strange. One of the things I really love about ATS is that there is almost always someone on ATS from whatever area in the world is affected by some major event. And we can always count on interesting and insightful posts from them regarding their perspective on what is really going on.

Have I just missed posts or threads like this about Ebola by ATS members in west Africa? Is it too sensitive of a subject? Or are there no ATS members from Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea, Nigeria, or Senegal?

I even checked how prevalent Internet access is in those countries. The hardest hit countries do not have a very high number of Internet users:

Sierra Leone has 71,318 Internet users representing 1.3% of the population
Liberia has 147,510 Internet users representing 3.8% of the population.
Guinea has 162,202 Internet users representing 1.5% of the population.

But that's still more than 380,000 Internet users.

In Senegal, there are 2,490,631 Internet users representing 19.2% of the population.

And Nigeria has the 8th most Internet users in the world - 55,930,391 Internet users representing 32.9% of the population. They have more Internet users than the UK... more than France... more than Italy... more than Spain. They have more Internet users than Canada, Australia, and Greece all combined.

So how come we are not seeing threads like 'Ebola - live updates from inside west Africa?' Or posts from people giving us a perspective on what's really going on there? The absence seems very unusual unless I've missed something.



posted on Sep, 11 2014 @ 05:05 AM
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a reply to: ikonoklast

I notice a lack of news coverage. Journalists jump into warzone's but so far noone is offering any coverage in West Africa. I watched on NBC here in the USA a journalist who supposedly went there, dressed up in a Biohazard suit, and went and collected a dead body and then helped bury it. It honestly looked fake and staged to me. She stands over the body in the grave and started to take off her suit and talk to the camera. "Later they will douse this all in bleach".




edit on 11-9-2014 by 1mpl3m3nt because: (no reason given)

edit on 11-9-2014 by 1mpl3m3nt because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 11 2014 @ 05:11 AM
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In Georgia (Russia) about 60 people under surveillance for Ebola

PanARMENIAN.Net - In Georgia, under the supervision to identify fever Ebola are 57 people who arrived in the country about a month ago.
On this, as reported by "Georgia-News", said the deputy head of the National Center for Disease Control and Public Health Paata Imnadze.

All under the supervision were 62 people. At the end of the incubation period (21 days) in five of them Fever was detected. 57 people are still under surveillance. In-mostly students from Nigeria. Imnadze noted that in the country from 170 million people were reported only 22 cases of infection with the virus. "At this point in Georgia is not recorded a single case of infection, thus no danger of the spread of Ebola in the country not" - he said.

LINK

Update on Italian patient- Malaria




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