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6,500 Year-Old 'Noah' Skeleton Found in Museum Closet

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posted on Aug, 10 2014 @ 10:30 PM
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originally posted by: BlackProjects
How does DNA compare to modern man? Biblically speaking there are many theories on how the "human race" was impure due to breading with either fallen angels or nephelim.

Not to worry. That's what the Flood was really all about - clearing out those dern giant hybrids, along with all the people that never even laid eyes on one.

Well, that and all the homosexuals (LOL).

Harte




posted on Aug, 10 2014 @ 10:33 PM
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originally posted by: Hanslune

I remember after one hot summers we reached the bottom of a well in Cyprus and found a skeleton at the bottom, his new resting place was at the Cyprus Archaeological Museum where he educates school kids on what life was like nearly 5,000 years ago on Cyprus.

They're not telling the kids the truth, are they?
Kids don't need to know how bad life actually sucked back then.

Your guy worked his butt off in a 16 hour shift in the copper mine only to accidentally fall into a well on the way home.

Probably utterly distracted by fatigue and starvation.

Harte



posted on Aug, 10 2014 @ 10:45 PM
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originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: Hanslune

I remember after one hot summers we reached the bottom of a well in Cyprus and found a skeleton at the bottom, his new resting place was at the Cyprus Archaeological Museum where he educates school kids on what life was like nearly 5,000 years ago on Cyprus.

They're not telling the kids the truth, are they?
Kids don't need to know how bad life actually sucked back then.

Your guy worked his butt off in a 16 hour shift in the copper mine only to accidentally fall into a well on the way home.

Probably utterly distracted by fatigue and starvation.

Harte


He was probably about 40 had the right arm of a swordsman and the left arm of a shield carrier, his teeth were in excellent shape, he had been struck in the left foot by a copper armor piercing arrow from which he recovered and had also survived two strong damaging blows to the left temple area. He was not from Cyprus but probably Anatolia and had with him a Babylonian cylinder seal and wore a gold bracelet on his left wrist. He also exhibited that in his youth he had been malnourished and had in his stomach indications of parasites - I forget which kinds I'd have to look up the report again. He would have been an interesting fellow. He had an empty wood/leather copper scabbard for a 14" knife, nicely made, the knife was missing.



posted on Aug, 10 2014 @ 10:50 PM
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So on top of all I said, he was murdered for his knife.

Harte



posted on Aug, 10 2014 @ 10:58 PM
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a reply to: Hanslune

That's pretty a pretty awesome little find, especially for being at the bottom of a well. The amount of information able to be determined about someone's life as they lived it during the EBA from 5000 year old remains is impressive to say the least. it's that amount of information that makes me scratch my head in some of these other threads, particularly those authored by the poster who refers to you as one of the 4 horsemen of the apocalypse lol The truth of our recent past is mind blowing enough that there really is no need to add in magical alien sculptors with their granite moving hovercrafts.



posted on Aug, 10 2014 @ 10:58 PM
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originally posted by: Harte
So on top of all I said, he was murdered for his knife.

Harte


There was a lot of debate as to who 'smiling jack' (we called him that because of his excellent teeth) was doing there, some thought mercenary, raider, merchant (his seal was of a grain merchant -we thought) how he ended up at the bottom of a well 4,500 years ago at Kalavassos, Cyprus...is unknowable.



posted on Aug, 10 2014 @ 10:59 PM
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a reply to: Harte
the mathematical monkeys are certainly the culprits behind this crime. down with the sapiens, power to the simians!



posted on Aug, 10 2014 @ 11:10 PM
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originally posted by: peter vlar
a reply to: Harte
the mathematical monkeys are certainly the culprits behind this crime. down with the sapiens, power to the simians!

Now you're reaching.

Harte



posted on Aug, 10 2014 @ 11:52 PM
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a reply to: Harte

I think you're just upset that I was able to solve all the mysteries of Incan and pre-Incan construction techniques. I would be dishonest if I didn't admit to being a little hurt but not as hurt as I was earlier when I lost my scientific soul mate. It really crushed my entire world view.



posted on Aug, 11 2014 @ 12:25 AM
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originally posted by: peter vlar
a reply to: Harte

I think you're just upset that I was able to solve all the mysteries of Incan and pre-Incan construction techniques. I would be dishonest if I didn't admit to being a little hurt but not as hurt as I was earlier when I lost my scientific soul mate. It really crushed my entire world view.


I would recommend drinking heavily of home made rice wine and laying in a pit of dry itchy leaves under a gibbous moon.



posted on Aug, 11 2014 @ 12:33 AM
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a reply to: Hanslune
Anything starting off with homemade rice wine doesn't sound so bad to me. Doesn't hurt to give it a shot or take 6 or 7 of the rice wine. Now you've got me itching for some hibachi and sake for dinner.



posted on Aug, 11 2014 @ 12:37 AM
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originally posted by: peter vlar
a reply to: Hanslune
Anything starting off with homemade rice wine doesn't sound so bad to me. Doesn't hurt to give it a shot or take 6 or 7 of the rice wine. Now you've got me itching for some hibachi and sake for dinner.


Nothing better than grilled Saba Shioyaki



posted on Sep, 6 2014 @ 12:42 AM
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a reply to: smyleegrl

Great catch! I was going to post on this as well but found you beat me to it in searching. Yes, ancient civilizations and history if very fascinating, not just what we are told but also forbidden archaeology and the various theories out there.

I noticed DNA has been mentioned a few times so, it just so happens...
Scientists Prepare to Solve Mystery of Sumerian DNA

... its intact teeth may include enough soft tissue to allow DNA testing

So I suppose we will see what turns up of this...or maybe not?

Until recently, the primary advocates for testing Sumerian DNA have been followers of Zecharia Sitchin, who hold the unusual belief that the ancient Sumerians socialized with extraterrestrials and may have carried alien genes. But there are plenty of more conventional reasons to study Sumerian DNA: it stands to tell us where the first city-builders came from and who their contemporary descendants are. The migration of the Sumerians is one of the great untold stories of human civilization; if we aim to tell it, DNA is the best tool we have.

If anything is found outside conventional thought/theory, I do not think we will know about it.
edit on 9/6/2014 by AllSourceIntel because: spelling

edit on 9/6/2014 by AllSourceIntel because: grammar



posted on Sep, 6 2014 @ 09:12 PM
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originally posted by: AllSourceIntel
a reply to: smyleegrl


I noticed DNA has been mentioned a few times so, it just so happens...
Scientists Prepare to Solve Mystery of Sumerian DNA

... its intact teeth may include enough soft tissue to allow DNA testing

So I suppose we will see what turns up of this...or maybe not?

Until recently, the primary advocates for testing Sumerian DNA have been followers of Zecharia Sitchin, who hold the unusual belief that the ancient Sumerians socialized with extraterrestrials and may have carried alien genes.

SNIP

The above is actually a mischaracterization.

The fact that the article itself states that there has never been any DNA from a time period that early in Mesopotamia explains why it's not been advocated for.

How would you advocate for DNA testing of ancient Sumerian (Ubadian here) DNA when there is none?

Unless, of course, you're a Sitchinista, as the article says.

That actually shows the stupidity of the hard-core Sitchin believers.

Harte



posted on Sep, 6 2014 @ 09:21 PM
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a reply to: Harte
I think you are missing the point that scientists are unable to extract DNA in most cases because the tissue required for it has not been present before ... until this skeleton. The article doesn't state they haven't extracted DNA because they can't, but rather because they didn't have the right speciment. It states:


... we’ve never been able to test the DNA of Sumerian remains.

Well, not until now. A complete skeleton from the Sumerian capital of Ur, dating back to about 4,500 BCE, was recently rediscovered in the Penn Museum—and its intact teeth may include enough soft tissue to allow DNA testing.

edit on 9/6/2014 by AllSourceIntel because: (no reason given)

edit on 9/6/2014 by AllSourceIntel because: formatting



posted on Sep, 6 2014 @ 09:58 PM
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originally posted by: AllSourceIntel
a reply to: Harte
I think you are missing the point that scientists are unable to extract DNA in most cases because the tissue required for it has not been present before ... until this skeleton. The article doesn't state they haven't extracted DNA because they can't, but rather because they didn't have the right speciment. It states:


... we’ve never been able to test the DNA of Sumerian remains.

Well, not until now. A complete skeleton from the Sumerian capital of Ur, dating back to about 4,500 BCE, was recently rediscovered in the Penn Museum—and its intact teeth may include enough soft tissue to allow DNA testing.

That was my point.

The statement I quoted was a mischaracterization.

Of course scientists "advocated" for DNA sampling (unlike the mischaracterization in the quote,) otherwise they wouldn't have known there wasn't any usable DNA from any specimen ever found.

Harte



posted on Sep, 6 2014 @ 10:08 PM
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a reply to: Harte

I am still not following what you are saying. First, you quoted my entire post, so I do not know what part of that post you are referencing. Second, what?



posted on Sep, 6 2014 @ 10:13 PM
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a reply to: AllSourceIntel

Actually, not to be rude but I do indeed believe the point was lost on you. The actual point was that followers of Sitchin, like the man himself have a rather hackneyed understanding of the history of that region during the tale end of the Neolithic into the early Bronze Age. The body in question, is from the Ubaid period. It predates Sumer which didn't actually become and entity until the Uruk period. Ubaid- prehistoric IE no written records, Uruk- brginning of modern written history. Lil bit of a difference. Therefore you're not actually testing ancient Sumerian DNA. Going from memory so I might be a little off but a few minutes in google could probably straighten it all out for you.

Its a bit of a dry read but I really recommend 'The Sumerians, their history, culture and Character' by Samuel Noah Kramer. It doesn't read quite as nice and fun like Sitchin but its actually got facts involved, written by someone who could really read the script. There aren't aliens or space zombies but as boring as he was, Kramer knew his ass from a hole in the ground.



posted on Sep, 6 2014 @ 10:15 PM
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a reply to: Harte

I thought there was some mtDNA recovered from that period? I might be having an off night though. 5 days of fever and almost no solid food will do that.



posted on Sep, 6 2014 @ 10:28 PM
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a reply to: peter vlar

Yes, I suppose the point was lost on me, but in all fairness that point was not clearly, or well stated by any means what so ever. Thank you for clearing that up though, I didn't think about it like that though knew that information somewhere in the back of my mind.




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