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Man Being Tested At Mount Sinai Hospital For Possible Ebola Virus

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posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 03:46 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko

originally posted by: wtf2008
a reply to: LDragonFire

For a virus that is apparently bad at spreading, it certainly seems to be doing a good job. I don't study virology, but I would think that the more people it infects and the more ways we try to treat it, the more likely it would be to mutate into possibly/probably something even more dangerous which is pretty worrying.


Not really. There are millions of people in the affected countries and the epidemic has been going on since late Frebruary or early March. We have just now topped 800 casualties. If it was really all that good at spreading, in a third world, unsanitary mess like those places tend to be, we'd be well into the tens of thousands or more by now.


I can't say I trust the numbers. With the African Summit being held in DC and the leaders of some of those nations cancelling their visit because of this, I can't see a leader of a country cancelling if this is nothing to worry about. Also, many of the African athletes from the Commonwealth Games are refusing to go back to Africa because of this. There is more going on than we think. For the CDC to have sent 50 of it's best over there says a lot.

Anyone have any figures on how many healthcare professionals have been sent in by other countries now? 50 just from the US is a lot for only 800 deaths....




posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 03:49 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko

originally posted by: wtf2008
a reply to: LDragonFire

For a virus that is apparently bad at spreading, it certainly seems to be doing a good job. I don't study virology, but I would think that the more people it infects and the more ways we try to treat it, the more likely it would be to mutate into possibly/probably something even more dangerous which is pretty worrying.


Not really. There are millions of people in the affected countries and the epidemic has been going on since late Frebruary or early March. We have just now topped 800 casualties. If it was really all that good at spreading, in a third world, unsanitary mess like those places tend to be, we'd be well into the tens of thousands or more by now.


How dare you good sir. I do not want to hear this. I just want to be scared and angry. What I am scared of. And who I am angry with. Are the only things I can control in my life as the world spins out of control. Do not throw facts at me. Like in 6 months there is only some 800 dead out of a population of roughly 17 million in the most affected areas of Africa. That number balloons by another roughly 130 million if you include Nigeria. I only want to read how Ebola is going to kill me and my family and everyone else in my country. So to you I say.....FOR SHAME.........



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 04:05 PM
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In my country ( Finland ) Red Cross ( Finland ) is looking for clinical nurses who are willing to go to the West Africa to help out in new clinic Red Cross is putting up in a place named Kenema in Sierra Leone.
The new clinic comes from Spain and staff are allready coming from UK, Norway, Australia and Spain.. and these are who have agreed to serve in new clinic..



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 04:07 PM
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Federal agents at U.S. airports are watching travelers ...

Border patrol agents at Washington's Dulles International and New York's JFK airport in particular have been told to ask travelers ...


ABC - Mount Sinai patient tested for Ebola virus

-
OBSERVATION:

Paychecks-to-Greet ... any Sick-(possibly-incurable)-Travelers.


( i.e. jobs that siphon )
.

edit on 4-8-2014 by FarleyWayne because: "siphon" ... "continuously suck"



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 04:13 PM
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originally posted by: FarleyWayne

Federal agents at U.S. airports are watching travelers ...

Border patrol agents at Washington's Dulles International and New York's JFK airport in particular have been told to ask travelers ...


ABC - Mount Sinai patient tested for Ebola virus

-
OBSERVATION:

Paychecks to GREET any Sick-(possibly-incurable?)-Travelers.

.


From your source:



Testing for Ebola is done at the CDC. According to a CDC spokesperson testing for Ebola takes 1-2 days after they receive the samples. The primary testing is PCR. This is performed on blood that has been treated to kill and live virus. So far CDC has tested samples from around 6 people who had symptoms consistent with Ebola and a travel history to the affected region.


So now there are 6? Or around 6? What does around 6 mean exactly? You either tested 6 or not. Ok, so the one from this report, and the two from earlier reports I can account for. Now there are 3 others? Hmmmm......
edit on 8/4/14 by Vasa Croe because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 04:23 PM
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East Harlem?

Isn't that where black people live?



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 04:25 PM
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a reply to: Vasa Croe

Since the outbreak began, there have been 6 other patients tested for Ebola, all came back negative. That is what is being reported on CNN, basically saying this patient in NY isn't the first scare, just the first one being reported.

That said, I certainly hope this guy didn't take the subway to the hospital.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 04:26 PM
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a reply to: Vasa Croe


Testing for Ebola is done at the CDC. According to a CDC spokesperson testing for Ebola takes 1-2 days after they receive the samples.

Any clues how long it takes with Elisa testing system ? Yesterday an older woman who was in a passenger plane from west africa and had some symptoms in a airplane, died in hospital and it was !ALL CLEAR-it was not ebola! within couple hours in the news.. Are we being lied to ?
edit on 4-8-2014 by dollukka because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 04:26 PM
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originally posted by: dollukka
In my country ( Finland ) Red Cross ( Finland ) is looking for clinical nurses who are willing to go to the West Africa to help out in new clinic Red Cross is putting up in a place named Kenema in Sierra Leone.
The new clinic comes from Spain and staff are allready coming from UK, Norway, Australia and Spain.. and these are who have agreed to serve in new clinic..


You communicate very well using the English language.....

Edit - no edit.
edit on 4-8-2014 by minusinfinity because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 04:31 PM
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a reply to: dollukka

I imagine some of the differences account for how the far the samples had to travel to testing facilities. The UK is a much smaller country than the US. And different labs in different countries will operate on different protocols under differing sets of regs. There is also the considerations for handling samples of something as potentially dangerous as this is. Sure they can do a rush, but there are still considerations that must be taken ... etc.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 04:33 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

It said 1 - 2 days AFTER they get the samples.. rather long time for testing.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 04:39 PM
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a reply to: dollukka

Still differences in protocols and testing procedures. Believe me, US government employees don't do a thing they aren't contracted to before they have to.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 04:46 PM
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a reply to: dollukka

For reference: the plane landed in Gatwick on Saturday morning at 8:15a, the woman died that day, at 11:00p on Sunday night tests concluded that the woman did not have Ebola.

From what I've gathered from CNN, we should know tomorrow whether or not this patient at Mt. Sinai has Ebola.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 04:52 PM
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a reply to: dollukka

There are rapid screening diagnostic kits that can yield results in 15 minutes. They look for certain antigens to the virus in the person being screened. But, it isn't perfect. A person who is newly infected may not have enough antigens in his blood stream to be detectible by the rapid tests. A negative rapid test does not rule out infection.

More accurate testing can take days to yield results.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 05:29 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

So Ebola is the new centerfold for DoomPorn yearly? I guess AIDS, SARS and H1N1 are gonna be pretty pissed. You never know though, they might get work done (boob job here, lip injection there) and make a huge come back.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 06:32 PM
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a reply to: dollukka

Are we being lied to ?


You will not be told the truth ... if it doesn't serve the agenda.

The CDC director was interviewed by Fox. He was Not telling the truth ... but he wasn't lying exactly either.

CDC Interview on Fox



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 06:51 PM
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originally posted by: dollukka
a reply to: Vasa Croe


Testing for Ebola is done at the CDC. According to a CDC spokesperson testing for Ebola takes 1-2 days after they receive the samples.

Any clues how long it takes with Elisa testing system ? Yesterday an older woman who was in a passenger plane from west africa and had some symptoms in a airplane, died in hospital and it was !ALL CLEAR-it was not ebola! within couple hours in the news.. Are we being lied to ?


You make an excellent point!



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 07:27 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
The proof is in the pudding, of course, but I still have my doubts that it will get much of a foothold in a country with a well-developed medical infrastructure and modern attitudes toward medicine. It's highly infectious once it erupts, but only in very close contact for a limited window before the patient is too sick to go far.


See I don't get this, it starts like a flu. how many people go to work with the flu these days? catch a subway and hold the rail, go to a shopping center and touch the shelves - modern medical facilities only help when every person in society is in fear of the bug and hiding in their homes. Go watch Contagion for my idea of this.

If it spreads and we move into ''isolate and kill'' plans... this would be crippling. Imagine whole cities on edge hiding in their homes for a month? economically its devastating.

Today's society has ever experienced anything like a deadly, untreatable outbreak in a metropolis. In the space of 3 weeks the situation could become dire and uncontrollable.

If this man is infected - it says he rocked p at the hospital in pain and sick - thus showing symptoms.

How many door handles did he touch from his apartment/home to the hospital.
How much money has he handled at the shop to buy food
How many people have been in the same room as him when he's coughed or touched a light switch
How many times has he touched his sweaty face then touched or brushed against someone on public transport or in a lift?

If he has it, its already too late!

edit on pm730318042014-08-04T19:30:30-05:00072014p by Agit8dChop because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 08:22 PM
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a reply to: Agit8dChop

If it spreads and we move into ''isolate and kill'' plans... this would be crippling. Imagine whole cities on edge hiding in their homes for a month? economically its devastating.

More likely six months to a year. Who has that much food or water stored? Every time you go to get more you risk infection. And, who would risk replenishing a hot zone?

Today's society has ever experienced anything like a deadly, untreatable outbreak in a metropolis. In the space of 3 weeks the situation could become dire and uncontrollable.

Everyone seems to want to downplay the risk. Do you think healthcare staff in Africa are not taking every precaution? And ... this incidence has not yet mutated into an aerosol form. I'm waiting 'til then to panic. LOL

Hemorrhagic Fever is nothing to mess around with. A patient is continuously and Highly contagious during the treatment phase ... which lasts for weeks. There are only a handful of medical facilities on the entire Earth where you could safely treat a patient. Those facilities have very few beds. Just what we're seeing in Africa would be a MASCAL event at any of those facilities.

That open Southern Border, combined with an expectation of free first-world healthcare, is a growing concern.

Just remember: You can't trust the infected.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 10:01 PM
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mmmmmm

People keep saying it's not a threat. But it can be...

The Virus apparently Hosts naturally in Bats, Bats are not that different than Rats

Rats out number people in NY 9-1

Anyone check the guys house House in NYC for Rats? In the Bronx? Where most people have Rats?

Could be a Rat licking some of his vomit from the toilet right now... Rats, which board ships in NYC one of the busiest seaports in the world and regularly cross the into Central Park where there are lots of... Bats, which can fly it anywhere and are the natural host...

Yeah, I wouldn't worry... the CDC thinks of everything

Hrrrrrm, wonder how many seats on a subway train a single bloody Rat might cross in a day and how many people use a single NY subway Train in the 3 days the virus can live? Maybe 500,000? maybe more?

But whatever...

Rats really aren't known for spreading disease and you know... if it doesn't spread fast in the open jungles of Africa why would it spread fast in a city where the Rats out number people 9-1 with one of the highest population densities in the world and a public transportation system that can wrap around the Earth several times which happens to be where most of those rats live and 70% of the people in the city use it every day?

(ouch the sarcasm broke my face)




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