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Found out a old purchase at a flea mkt may be valuable.

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posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 09:23 AM
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originally posted by: AutumnWitch657
The top of the Washington monument is clad in aluminum. It was precious at the time. Like gold as you said. Anyway it's been up there since 1884 so how delicate could it be?


Aluminum will last many years in a non-saline environment due to the thin layer of oxide it builds up. Another issue is galvanic corrosion when you place two dissimilar metals in contact. The aluminum will start to corrode almost immediately.



edit on 4-8-2014 by AugustusMasonicus because: networkdude has no beer




posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 09:26 AM
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One thing that bugs me is that there is no mention of the ship's bell being found.. at least that I see. The is mention of some wreckage being washed up after it was observed foundering in a storm, but nothing mentioned about the bell, which would have been a positive ID for the vessel being sunk there.
The other would be that the ship was built in 1884, why is the bell dated 1892?



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 09:28 AM
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a reply to: ntech

I looked up the Lloyd's Registry on this ship and it appears to be classified as an unknown location wreck.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 09:34 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus
Here is a link to the wreck report for the Ohau with the story of the wreck.


After leaving the port of Greymouth, the first evidence of any importance about the vessel is that of David Scott, Lighthouse-overseer, who was at the Cape Campbell Lighthouse on the 14th May last, and saw the "Ohau" from 3 p.m. to shortly after 5 p.m. steaming against a south-east gale "with a great deal of white water dashing over the ship's funnel, which continued to do so from 3 p.m. until shortly after 5 p.m., when she was lost sight of." This appears to be the last that was seen of the ship. That she was lost there is no doubt, because some of the wreckage has been washed ashore in the vicinity of Castle Point, but how she was lost there is no evidence to show. But there is evidence to show that it would have been more prudent for the master to have taken shelter instead of facing such a gale.


plimsoll.org
If there was water washing over the funnel, it is possible that the ship suffered an explosion. If water washes in the funnel and down through to the fires, a great deal of steam can be created in an instant, over-pressurizing the firebox of the boiler. The results can be catastrophic.


edit on b000000312014-08-04T09:48:59-05:0009America/ChicagoMon, 04 Aug 2014 09:48:59 -0500900000014 by butcherguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 10:12 AM
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Curious the wrecksite link states the Ohau is a steamer but the portsite wreck report says it's schooner rigged. Not uncommon to have both back then but interesting all the same.

Definitely lost at sea though judging by the lighthouse operators report and the discovery of wreckage.

Also the construction date and your bells date are contradictory. Could there be a conversion to steamer performed in '92 and the bell date reflects the refit?

Sorry lots of questions and suppositions, no answers I'm afraid.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 10:17 AM
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originally posted by: blkcwbyhat
a reply to: AutumnWitch657
if it is aluminum,its a fake for sure.Aluminum will rot away in no time if its in water.Thats why almost everything on a boat is brass or stainless steel.In the 1890's,aluminum was almost gold!



My Great Grandfather cast all the Bronze for Harland & Wolff, including that of 'Titanic'.

Brass is rarely used. It is not nearly as strong and prone to corrosion of a type that turns it brittle.

Aluminum is a very popular modern shipbuilding material due to it's corrosion resistance and lightweight.

I've never seen an aluminum bell in my life and I'd be very surprised if that's what this is.

The colour appears to be that of nickel plating, again rarely if ever used onboard.

I have a bell, very similar to this one, but in Bronze and it has a date cast into it which bears no relationship to when it was actually made.

I'd like to know more about this bell, but at this point I'd say the odds that it is an artifact are about 1000 to 1.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 10:19 AM
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copper/bronze alloy most probably



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 10:24 AM
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originally posted by: Kukri
Curious the wrecksite link states the Ohau is a steamer but the portsite wreck report says it's schooner rigged. Not uncommon to have both back then but interesting all the same.



I'm sure there are multiple vessels named 'Oahu'.

The S.S. refers to her being a 'Steam Ship'.

Schooners are smaller, handier sailers than full rigged ships and were almost NEVER equipped with steam propulsion.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 10:26 AM
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originally posted by: IAMAMOG
copper/bronze alloy most probably


No such thing.

Bronze IS predominantly copper in the first place.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 10:30 AM
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a reply to: Psynic



I'm sure there are multiple vessels named 'Oahu'.

I believe there were multiple vessels named 'Oahu'. There are multiple hits for different ships named 'Oahu'.

But the name on the bell is 'Ohau' and I only get hits for one ship by that name.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 10:34 AM
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originally posted by: butcherguy
a reply to: Psynic



I'm sure there are multiple vessels named 'Oahu'.

I believe there were multiple vessels named 'Oahu'. There are multiple hits for different ships named 'Oahu'.

But the name on the bell is 'Ohau' and I only get hits for one ship by that name.



Hahaha! I didn't notice that.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 10:54 AM
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I haven't seen this newspaper report of the possible location of wreckage of the Ohau anywhere here yet.

paperspast.natlib.govt.nz...



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 11:09 AM
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originally posted by: TDawgRex
a reply to: ntech

As a caveat I must say that I am not a antiques expert, just a amateur.

But at first glance, it causes me to raise an eyebrow. It's in to pristine condition for something recovered from a sunken shipwreck. It looks like it was made yesterday.


Agreed. How many "TITANIC" ship's bells must there be hanging on walls around the world?



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 11:13 AM
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a reply to: ntech

Please tell us what you believe the bell is made from.

You don't need Sotheby's to determine that.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 11:16 AM
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I have a steam locomotive bell from a 4-8-4 class engine.




posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 11:17 AM
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originally posted by: nerbot

originally posted by: TDawgRex
a reply to: ntech

As a caveat I must say that I am not a antiques expert, just a amateur.

But at first glance, it causes me to raise an eyebrow. It's in to pristine condition for something recovered from a sunken shipwreck. It looks like it was made yesterday.


Agreed. How many "TITANIC" ship's bells must there be hanging on walls around the world?


Very true, but who would make a reproduction of a ships bell from an obscure coal collier?

There's gotta be a story here somewhere.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 11:49 AM
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a reply to: Psynic

It's brass I think. When I cleaned her up back after I bought it the color is a light shiny yellow. But I haven't cleaned it since and it definitely darkened a bit. And with the clapper it weighed 11.6 lbs on the bathroom scale.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 12:04 PM
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originally posted by: Psynic
I haven't seen this newspaper report of the possible location of wreckage of the Ohau anywhere here yet.

paperspast.natlib.govt.nz...


After I read the article linked here I had a thought. What if the bell was attached to something that floated when the wreck broke up? And some beach goer in 1904 found a souvenir.

LOOK at what I found in the sand Mommee!

edit on 4-8-2014 by ntech because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 12:21 PM
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originally posted by: ntech
a reply to: Psynic

It's brass I think. When I cleaned her up back after I bought it the color is a light shiny yellow. But I haven't cleaned it since and it definitely darkened a bit. And with the clapper it weighed 11.6 lbs on the bathroom scale.



I doubt it very much.

Ship's bells are cast from Bronze. Brass would corrode, weaken and crack.

When polished, bronze and brass are nearly identical. We sailors refer to it as 'Irish Gold'.

Pleasure yachts, in which no expense has been spared, are referred to as 'Gold Platers' because the bronze would be plated with a thin layer of gold to prevent it from turning green.

Brass may exhibit an extremely slight attraction to a powerful magnet, while bronze will not.

Brass will flake when drilled, where as bronze will shred. If you pull that bolt out and try reaming the hole in the bracket a tiny bit you'll see the difference.

Both metals produce a 'Verdi Gris' like the copper roofing on old buildings when exposed to the elements or acidity.

I don't know whether it's the lighting or the dust, but I can't distinguish any yellow in the photograph you posted ?



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 12:25 PM
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a reply to: Psynic



I don't know whether it's the lighting or the dust, but I can't distinguish any yellow in the photograph you posted ?

I went back and looked at it again and I think it may be the dust.



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