Why can't we hear sound from the sun?

page: 1
1
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join

posted on Dec, 3 2004 @ 10:51 PM
link   
I was thinking about the EM wavelengths that exist, and considering the sun puts out light, UV, gamma, etc., I know that a nuclear fireball has to put out sound also. Why can't we record or hear this sound? I would like to hear the sounds of the explosive force of the sun. Why is it that none is to be found, or why can't we hear the suns constant explosion?




posted on Dec, 3 2004 @ 10:56 PM
link   
Get within distance of the high temperature plasma and maybe you will hear vibrations within it, ofcourse you would be dead.

The reason we can't "hear" it is because sound waves require a medium to propagate, space is a vacuum and as such will not conduct sound waves.



posted on Dec, 3 2004 @ 11:04 PM
link   

Originally posted by Sigma
Get within distance of the high temperature plasma and maybe you will hear vibrations within it, ofcourse you would be dead.

The reason we can't "hear" it is because sound waves require a medium to propagate, space is a vacuum and as such will not conduct sound waves.


Thank you for what I was just about to post.



posted on Dec, 3 2004 @ 11:18 PM
link   
Well I knew someone would post that sound requires pressure to travel through, but even space has a pressure - albiet near a perfect vacuum. A perfect vacuum is theoretically impossible. What we see is a near vacuum, and thus sound can still travel through space. Because of this, the sound wavelength would be weak, but still detectable. I am sure it could be isolated and amplified - then reproduced so we can 'hear' the sun burning. I have never heard anything about this, not that it matters to hear it, but it seems like something new.



posted on Dec, 3 2004 @ 11:22 PM
link   

Originally posted by ben91069
Well I knew someone would post that sound requires pressure to travel through, but even space has a pressure - albiet near a perfect vacuum. A perfect vacuum is theoretically impossible. What we see is a near vacuum, and thus sound can still travel through space. Because of this, the sound wavelength would be weak, but still detectable. I am sure it could be isolated and amplified - then reproduced so we can 'hear' the sun burning. I have never heard anything about this, not that it matters to hear it, but it seems like something new.


So you are saying that you found something that all us having been blind to all these days?

Surf



posted on Dec, 3 2004 @ 11:29 PM
link   
This is actually an interesting topic for me and would love to see more opinions and/or theories on sound.

Since sound is actually vibrations traveling across a frequency (am I understanding this?), does this mean that sound is 'movement'?

If so, then does size determine frequency of vibration? Seems like this would be simple to emulate.



posted on Dec, 3 2004 @ 11:32 PM
link   
your idea depends on a continuous 'surface' of particles. space doesnt have this. yeah, one particle may get moved due to vibrations and sound, but then what? it just travels on, and itll eventually hit something, but not for a long time, a long way away. if, by some freak miracle, it ever got to us, we cant detect one particle out of the trillions in our atmosphere.

ur making sound by moving your head to the music. and if you comb your hair, you're charged, so you're making EM radiation. fat chance hearing it or seeing it.



posted on Dec, 3 2004 @ 11:33 PM
link   
No, I have not found anything about this. This is just a current thought or observation. Just sharing my thoughts with people on the board. Yes, a perfect vacuum cannot happen in a physical world, because it cannot be measured. This in and of itself could become a topic, but pressure is measured relative to something, and at least based on physical laws. If pressure becomes an absolute of 0, then there is no way to measure it. Measurements are all based on relative acquaintances with other things. 14.7 # is based off of zero. Zero, cannot really be measured, because it is an infinite point. Sorry if I am being anal about it, but as long as pressure differs from true 0, then some sound can travel. This is the same as 90 degree angles or pi, they are theoretical instances that don't exist in reality.



posted on Dec, 3 2004 @ 11:39 PM
link   
90 degree angles don't exist? I've never heard about that. please elaborate.



posted on Dec, 4 2004 @ 12:32 AM
link   
.
The medium of propagation of 'sound' we perceive is air.
Our eardrum and nerves are driven/stimulated by a certain range of air waves.
Dogs can hear very high frequencies we don't.
Some people(?) and animals hear/feel very low frequencies.

The near-perfect vacuum of space works in some ways as an insulator from some frequencies.

Does every micro-shift in mass create a gravity wave? Logically it must. I suppose if you could read fine detail in gravity waves of almost anything. Maybe the Universe has some dampening effect on them. (They are short lived?) Maybe the Universe has some tension threshhold that absorbs micro-gravity waves.

It makes me think about the material on the surface of the sun, exploding out and being pulled back in by gravity alone. If (not completely sure about this) the sun has no halo/atmosphere of gas then there is no areodynamics possible. You would have to have pure power to keep you from being pulled in by the gravity, near its surface.
.



posted on Dec, 4 2004 @ 01:18 AM
link   

Originally posted by Skibum
90 degree angles don't exist? I've never heard about that. please elaborate.


in space there is no such thing as a straight line, nor time and there are no continuums..

edit: theres more too, but my memory is hazey on that subject

[edit on 4/12/04 by dnero6911]



posted on Dec, 4 2004 @ 01:34 AM
link   
Look at it this way:

You have two contairnes, 1 with what represtents the air on earth oand one wich represents the vaccum of space. You take a look at the atoms in bnoth cobntainers and notice a slight difference...ha, actually this difference is huge, your claim to say that space in not a total vacuum is not significant to the argument you are stating...sort of. What are you stating, that radiation makes it a non existent total vacuum? How old are you 14?

Anyway, the atoms which are fo0und to make up the air on earth are abundant, the atoms that comnpirse the vacuum of space are virtually none existent(which is why we refer to it as a "vacuum" Yaay, we just learned some vital info)...say the container is 999 miles long and 999 mile sw ide. Now, In order for :"sound to travel" it needs these vital atooms in space, something to move around. Something as you say "propagate". If their is an absence of atoms or any particles, say stray quarks which as we know do not stray away from the atom, their is nothing to carry the sound. So what you need to answer is "How sound travels with a lack of or sufficient lack of present atoms. I suggest you read aboook by two gentlemen named Taylor and Wheeler called SPace Time Physics, a book handed down to me by my fatherl. Though published in 60's it will still offer to you a greater degree of enofrmation to realize what you are saying makes non sense.


PS, sorry for bad typing (and other stuff if it occured)), but Wild Turkey and 1:40 in the am have never been good fer me.



posted on Dec, 4 2004 @ 01:56 AM
link   
Skibum,

No, a true 90 degree angle only exists in theory and math. A razor blade put under a microscope is not a sharp edge, but rounded or at least jagged. Your vision of what is a right angle is relative to how close/far away you are to an edge. Because all geometric measurements are based on perpudicularity to a round ball we call earth should tell you that world measurements of angles are close approximations, not exact angles.



posted on Dec, 4 2004 @ 02:13 AM
link   
Another thought about space having some pressure and matter is almost another paradox. If space could not transmit sound because it has zero pressure, then why do pressurized spacecraft not explode in this atmosphere? The spacecraft hull has a physical limit on how much stress it can withstand. If space had zero pressure then it could not be measured how much stress the pressure differential between a pressurized cabin and the outside could withstand. If space has an absolute 0 pressure, these figures could not be calculated.


XL5

posted on Dec, 4 2004 @ 02:25 AM
link   
Even if there is no such thing as a perfect vacuum or a perfect anything, alot of the times it can be perfect enough. Maybe if you had a microphone in space in exactly the right spot, you might hear the sound of one atom that hit the mic (like hearing 1nS of a song), but thats all.

Our atmosphere is so dense that any one atom that hit it would either light up or just do nothing like dropping a grain of dust on a still lake and watching for the ripple at the shore.



posted on Dec, 4 2004 @ 02:33 AM
link   
True, maybe it isn't worthy of even being recorded, but I think it is possible. Your point, I think, is that things are relative. I agree. Theoretically, any sound wave that was ever produced is travelling through space away from its source. A Hitler speech made in the 40's is still travelling through space for someone to hear.


E_T

posted on Dec, 4 2004 @ 03:05 AM
link   

Originally posted by ben91069
Another thought about space having some pressure and matter is almost another paradox. If space could not transmit sound because it has zero pressure, then why do pressurized spacecraft not explode in this atmosphere? The spacecraft hull has a physical limit on how much stress it can withstand. If space had zero pressure then it could not be measured how much stress the pressure differential between a pressurized cabin and the outside could withstand. If space has an absolute 0 pressure, these figures could not be calculated.
Pressure inside spaceship is only 1 bar.
Do you think that increase in external pressure will cause human to "implode" when diving to depth of ten meters where outside pressure is 1 bar bigger than atmospheric pressure.
Neither will body explode in vacuum because pressure difference is only 1 bar.



Exploding Lungs and Spaceships - The human body is very tough and could easily survive the vacuum of space, so why couldn't you use a breathing apparatus [like a Scuba]? If you're saying that molecules would become unfixed and simply explode, as in your quoting NASA saying your lungs would explode, then why don't space ships that are filled with air simply explode? I realize metal is in some ways stronger than the human body, but likewise in other ways, like resiliency and dexterity, the human body is tougher than metal. - James

Your right that much of the human body is tough, but the lungs are relatively fragile. Certainly not near the strength of a spaceship hull. Scuba divers have been dealing with these issues for years.

The atmosphere of our planet at sea level pushes against us with the force of about 14.7 pounds per square inch (PSI). Ideally a spaceship would be pressurized the same, but NASA has used lower cabin pressures (around 5psi) during spaceflights (To do this you have to increase the percent of oxygen in the air so the astronauts can breath normally. This is increases the risk of fire, though. The three astronauts that died on the launch pad in 1965 were victims of a flash fire which was partly the result of using a cabin environment with a near 100% oxygen level).

Let's look at an ideal spaceship that would contain 14.7psi. Can metal stand that kind of pressure? A typical scuba tank can withstand more than 3000 psi! Remember a spaceship cabin is just a big tank of air. Even the thin-walled propane tank on your gas grill can safely contain a pressure of 325psi - more than 21 times the pressure needed on our ideal spaceship.

Now how about the human lung? Again we will go back to scuba divers. As you go down into the water the pressure becomes greater at a much faster rate than it does as you move down through air. The only way divers can breath underwater is by using air pressurized the same level as the water around them. For this reason divers must be very carefully to breath normally as they ascend. If they hold their breath they could rupture a lung because the air in the lung expands as they go upward. It has been shown that a lung can rupture if the diver is holding his breath and ascends as little as 4 feet. That's an increase of only 1.7psi. Much less than even the 5 to 14.7psi of a spaceship cabin and certainly much less than a metal hull of a spaceship can stand.
www.unmuseum.org...


Human Exposure to Vacuum
www.sff.net...

Can you hear sounds in space?
curious.astro.cornell.edu...



posted on Dec, 4 2004 @ 05:22 AM
link   

Originally posted by ben91069
I was thinking about the EM wavelengths that exist, and considering the sun puts out light, UV, gamma, etc., I know that a nuclear fireball has to put out sound also. Why can't we record or hear this sound? I would like to hear the sounds of the explosive force of the sun. Why is it that none is to be found, or why can't we hear the suns constant explosion?


Ahhh but you can hear them.....

www.spacesounds.com...

It's a cool site, plus the have other sounds available when you click the small spheres on the bottom left.

Enjoy


XL5

posted on Dec, 4 2004 @ 06:06 AM
link   
That is not sound that was transmitted, it was radio waves or light (radio waves and light waves can travel through a perfect vacuum). The sound on that site was an audio representation of the RF noise coming from them using a radio telescope.



posted on Dec, 4 2004 @ 06:32 AM
link   

Originally posted by XL5
That is not sound that was transmitted, it was radio waves or light (radio waves and light waves can travel through a perfect vacuum). The sound on that site was an audio representation of the RF noise coming from them using a radio telescope.


And? If you read what the site says , and I quote
"Explore our solar system and beyond as you search for actual spacesounds learn about spacesounds and navigate your wayt hrough their origins"

Regarding the sun, "helioseismologists are "listening" to the Sun using the Michelson Doppler Imager aboard Nasa's SOHO"

I was simply pointing out that there is a site that you can go to and listen.





new topics
top topics
 
1
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join