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THE CORICANCHA AN UNFATHOMABLE MASTERPIECE OF STONEWORK

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posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 12:53 PM
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originally posted by: lisa2012

originally posted by: Harte


originally posted by: skunkape23

This is the first time I've heard of this one. It is really a stretch for me to believe this was made by primitive jungle people.


No sheet.



It's also really a stretch to call the Inca in 1450 AD "primitive jungle people," but you can't maintain the chronic astonishment unless you lie about the builders.



Harte




Harte,



The only problem is that there is clearly a pre inca culture that built majority of the archeological sites we see in Qosqo and in different parts of Peru.

It's not a problem for me.
There are several known pre-Inca cultures. The Wari, for example.
A different culture (non-Incan) constructed the Tiahuanaco complex as well, and it probably wasn't the Wari.

But the site this thread is about is Incan, thus my comment.

I envy you your Peruvian trip. I'd probably spend all my time in restaurants though!

Harte




posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 02:18 PM
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a reply to: Harte

Harte sent you a PM on this subject



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 02:55 PM
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originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: lisa2012

originally posted by: Harte


originally posted by: skunkape23

This is the first time I've heard of this one. It is really a stretch for me to believe this was made by primitive jungle people.


No sheet.

Peruvian Food was out of this world. I have to say I was absolutely impressed.

On the other hand, there is so much to see and explore from the archeological point of view. Also the topography of this country is absolutely amazing, from the jungle to sand dunes, ocean mountains. Breathtaking!





It's also really a stretch to call the Inca in 1450 AD "primitive jungle people," but you can't maintain the chronic astonishment unless you lie about the builders.



Harte




Harte,



The only problem is that there is clearly a pre inca culture that built majority of the archeological sites we see in Qosqo and in different parts of Peru.

It's not a problem for me.
There are several known pre-Inca cultures. The Wari, for example.
A different culture (non-Incan) constructed the Tiahuanaco complex as well, and it probably wasn't the Wari.

But the site this thread is about is Incan, thus my comment.

I envy you your Peruvian trip. I'd probably spend all my time in restaurants though!

Harte



posted on Aug, 7 2014 @ 07:37 AM
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they dont make em like they used to



posted on Sep, 1 2014 @ 10:43 PM
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Stonework is impeccable. Some studies have found that the exterior of rocks has a different composition to the core which hints that they may have heated the rocks (over 1100 Celsius) or used unknown chemicals to soften the rocks prior to cutting them.

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posted on Sep, 14 2014 @ 12:30 PM
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originally posted by: zatara
a reply to: JamesTB
These walls with that precision masonairy can be found in many places around the world.

Here is such a wall located at the imperial palace in Japan..




And at this one at Cuzco the builder is showing off his skill... or is he trying to tell us something?



The best theory I've heared is that these stones are poured or moulded into position... What I find very intriguing are these notches on the surface of some of the stones. Why do some stones have them and why some do not..



Notching and interlocking the layers in a dry laid wall makes it stronger than simply layering it in the same manner as mortared brick/block walls are laid today. Large retaining walls of what appear to be dry laid manufactered landscaping blocks laid in unbroken horizontal lines are actually cemented together with an adhesive and only have an appearance of being dry laid.





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