THE CORICANCHA AN UNFATHOMABLE MASTERPIECE OF STONEWORK

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posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 09:55 AM
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The Coricancha in Cusco Peru is without a doubt one of the finest works of art on the face of the entire planet in my opinion. The skill and artistry used in the building of this incredibly meticulous structure are without rival in my opinion. If it wasn't so large this place should be hanging in the Louvre. Each stone used in the construction is a work of precision art in itself and they're thousands of them. But what I find most mysterious about this building is that it was supposed built by primitive people in what was essentially a jungle. Personally I find that hard to believe. It's very easy to look at the historic timeline and say 'oh yeah the Inca built that' but to the logical and inquiring mind that doesn't make a blind bit of sense. No mortar was used in the building so why doesn't it just fall over? It gives off the impression that the stones were melded together. This isn't primitive work planned and executed by primitive minds, on the contrary, this is a work of high specification technology.


s3.postimg.org...


Look at how these stones fit together -


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The work of essentially primitive natives in a jungle?


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Now take a look down at the tops of the walls -


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How was this achieved without mortar? Without precision tools? Or even a CAD plan from a computer?


s21.postimg.org...


Stone Work at the Coricancha



YouTube Link -

www.youtube.com...

I don't believe for a second that the Inca made this what do you think?




posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 10:08 AM
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a reply to: JamesTB

Nice post. S&F. Never heard of it.

It looks so modern, amazing feat of construction and engineering. What are the theories of it's construction? The Precision is what's so impressive.

The YT video states it's made from one stone. Was it cut down from a quarry somewhere then reassembled, again with that precision, is amazing. It looks like when they made the blocks, there was little to no waste of materials. In the video, it looks like in adjacent blocks you can see veins and seams that flow from one to the other blocks.
edit on 3-8-2014 by pavil because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 10:18 AM
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It reminds me of the Osireion in Egypt.


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posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 10:26 AM
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I agree with you completely OP. There are ancient sites all over this entire planet which are clearly not the works of primitive man. Sadly, you will never ever convince the skeptics by using these sights. They will claim all day long until they are blue in the face that THIS specific primitive tribe built the site at THIS specific time and yada yada yada - it's all bullcrap. These same people claim ENTIRE underwater cities are nothing more than 'natural rock formations.'


Now before I get flamed - I am not saying ALIENS!!! Ahhh there's that word. All I am saying is - we are dead wrong about human history. Modern, intelligent man has been around for a hell of a lot longer than mainstream science claims. We've been around as smart as we are today since before the last Ice Age - at the very least.

In all likelihood - man has progressed to reach the stars and then managed to nuke themselves back into the stone age many times over again by this point in time.
edit on 3-8-2014 by lightedhype because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 10:28 AM
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a reply to: JamesTB

Just had dinner with my friend and her cousins from Peru. They mentioned Cusco specifically as someplace I must visit. They too don't believe in the "historical theory" behind it's construction.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 10:44 AM
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Very mysterious indeed, definitely something I'd like to visit if I ever go down those parts.
This guy called Brian Forster has a few theories and makes lots of vids on these sites, have look if you haven't already






posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 10:44 AM
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This is the first time I've heard of this one. It is really a stretch for me to believe this was made by primitive jungle people.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 10:46 AM
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I've always been of the mindset these great stone works were left as a 'clue" because all other materials degrade so much faster. Yes stone "wears" but at a much slower rate than metal, textiles....ect....

Aliens are undoubtedly afoot, but PULEEEZE!!!

Humans aren't anything to sneeze at and we used to be much better at problem solving before we began relying on tech.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 10:53 AM
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You know if you rub two stones of the same consistency together they will become very flat and smooth.
It's amazing what can be achieved in time if you dont have the internet and TV to distract you.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 10:55 AM
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I've been saying it for years, that there is no way that primitive humans carved some of these stones. If stone carving was so easy, especially today with the modern tools we have, then everyone would be doing it. I'd like to see someone carve a rock this size, to that precision with the tools that primitive humans had at the time. Even if they could shape the rock, how would they get it so precise? Even with modern tools, that is hard to achieve. There's something that has been hidden from us, as I believe many things have been found at these ancient sites and hidden.

S&F, BTW. Great thread. IT'S JUST A ROCK!!!!! lol
edit on 3-8-2014 by Fylgje because: to add



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 12:02 PM
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Good thread. Those primitive jungle people sure were picky with their building, the stuff was made to last for a real long time. If these structures were made by primitive people and the crap they build nowadays only lasts fifty years, maybe we should rethink the direction we are going in.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 12:04 PM
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a reply to: JamesTB
Exquisite craftsmanship, isn't it? As has been said before on ATS. Our ancestors were anything but primitive. The evidence for that statement exists on just about every continent in the world. Human intelligence didn't begin with modern society. Our ancestors were just as smart, if not smarter, than we are. It is knowledge and understanding that ebbs and flows throughout history, affected by events and circumstances. S&F.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 12:06 PM
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originally posted by: Fylgje
I've been saying it for years, that there is no way that primitive humans carved some of these stones. If stone carving was so easy, especially today with the modern tools we have, then everyone would be doing it. I'd like to see someone carve a rock this size, to that precision with the tools that primitive humans had at the time. Even if they could shape the rock, how would they get it so precise? Even with modern tools, that is hard to achieve. There's something that has been hidden from us, as I believe many things have been found at these ancient sites and hidden.

S&F, BTW. Great thread. IT'S JUST A ROCK!!!!! lol


The incentive to build with stone would be to resist attack. Defences in Europe went from dirt mounds to wooden forts then to stone castles and chateaus. The need for stone was due to attack from archers, cannons, trebuchets, and siege platforms. With the Peruvians mountains, the worst weapons were axes and bows/arrows. But given that
there were so many tribes, and some dealt with slavery/cannibalism, heading towards the mountains and building
stone fortifications around reservoirs would have been a sensible survival strategy.

Then back those hundreds of years, the climate may have been much different where it was possible to grow crops on fields and there would have been no jungle.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 01:06 PM
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originally posted by: lightedhype
I agree with you completely OP. There are ancient sites all over this entire planet which are clearly not the works of primitive man.

"primitive" how ? Because they don't have computers. How about NOT primitive because they can create stone buildings that we haven't a clue how to make. Surely they would say we are primitive since, to them , the skill would have been second nature. Bet you a fiver their kids knew how to do it !!!!
edit on 3/8/2014 by yorkshirelad because: spelling



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 01:14 PM
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a reply to: JamesTB

I'm on holiday at the moment so can't get too involved but seriously you seem to take nothing from previous threads where really good info is given to you to consider.
I'll not dwell too long on how daft it is to regard these folk as primitive, but just think about how straight a brick or stone block wall can be made with nothing more than string and a keen eye.
If humans were truly how you seem to view them then god freaking help us. We would never have mastered tying our own shoelaces.
You use velcro, don't you?
edit on 3-8-2014 by skalla because: typos, on the wife's sodding touchscreen



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 01:22 PM
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a reply to: yorkshirelad

we know how to make them, we just don't really want to.

these stones look nice and all, but they require a great deal of highly specialized labor and time.

heck, I think it would be funny if aliens traveled thousands of light-years or whatever, simply to build an elaborate pile of rocks with little practical purpose.


I fail to believe that there were civilizations more advanced than us, simply because we haven't found ancient garbage-dumps/heaps that consist of more than pottery, bones, or crude metal objects. Supposing we do find anything noteworthy, it always seems to be more of an artisan work than something that was massed-produced for the general public (like pottery or etc.)



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 01:54 PM
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originally posted by: NonsensicalUserName
a reply to: yorkshirelad

I fail to believe that there were civilizations more advanced than us, simply because we haven't found ancient garbage-dumps/heaps that consist of more than pottery, bones, or crude metal objects. Supposing we do find anything noteworthy, it always seems to be more of an artisan work than something that was massed-produced for the general public (like pottery or etc.)


Everything would have been recycled. Metal items would have been melted down when they could no longer be sharpened. Clothes like linen and leather would have decomposed. If the inhabitants had decided to leave for whatever reason, or the locations were looted, anything of practical use would have been taken.

I don't believe civilizations were more technical than us, even now many people still get by with wood fires and food markets. Having supplies of fresh water, central heating, sewer systems and organized food production and messengers would be a luxury in some places even now. And the Romans had those two thousand years ago.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 02:43 PM
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A recent thread discusses the emerging belief that the Amazon jungle is relatively new, and that the majority of building in the central/south America's was done before forestation.


The question had been whether the early Amazon was highly deforested or barely touched, Carson said.

"The surprising thing we found was that it was neither," he told Live Science. "It was this third scenario where, when people first arrived on the landscape, the climate was drier."

The pollen in this time period came mostly from grasses and a few drought-resistant species of trees. After about 2,000 years ago, more and more tree pollen appears in the samples, including fewer drought-resistant species and more evergreens, the researchers report today (July 7) in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Charcoal levels also went down, indicating a less-fire-prone landscape. These changes were largely driven by an increase in precipitation, Carson said.

The earthworks predate this shift, which reveals that the diggers of these ditches created them before the forest moved in around them. They continued to live in the area as it became forested, probably keeping clear regions around their structures, Carson said.

"It kind of makes sense," he said. "It's easier to stomp on a sapling than it is to cut down a big Amazonian tree with a stone ax."


Which makes sense. The amount of husbandry required to create corn....it had to have been a highly agricultural civilization that undertook such a task. Corn is the Michaelangelo of the plant world, genetically speaking.

So to answer the question about protecting crops....certainly. And the tribes of the america's tended to be at war with each other nearly constantly.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 02:59 PM
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a reply to: JamesTB

Never heard of this before. Thanks


Just wondering, why do they have to be primitive? We always assume that anything before us, especially way further back, were primitive & unintelligent. Yet we have clear examples of something amazingly advanced for the time period, like this, so who's to say they weren't intelligent. Maybe they were able to get a lot of fish in their diet?

The one I'm curious about, I can't remember the people or the time period, was a tribe of people that were mining for gold millions of years ago when gold meant nothing but a different colored stone. ((I just texted the person who told me about them but I'm not sure if/when they will respond back. When they do, I will post it in here))



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 03:13 PM
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a reply to: JamesTB

I watched the video in the expectation it was some oblique promotion of someone or other running tours in S America. Good to see it wasn't. Also good to see such excellent stone masonry and can understand how people get the 'OMG' effect from seeing the craftsmanship.

Those blocks are certainly flat and the walls are well constructed.

Straight edges and walls don't require the secret knowledge of lost races or visitors from the stars. They used gravity and plumb-bobs to get vertical walls and gravity alone will keep a well-built wall upright without mortar - dry-stone walls cover thousands of miles across the world.

The superbly-crafted surfaces are evidence of organisation and days of intensive labour. Have a read of this >>> Who taught the Inca stonemasons their skills? A comparison of Teohuanico and Inca cut-stone masonry. The references are missing, but I've got a copy of the paper that has them if you want it.

I'd point out that there's a quarry where the stone was taken from and evidence that the rock was pounded out with rock hammers, but you've heard it all before.





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