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Headphones adapters - am I losing my mind?

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posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 10:09 AM
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a reply to: Lynk3

Its not so much the frequency range that you should focus on, in a studio monitor or otherwise. Its how the transducer replicates the frequency range it does have, including everything from flat response to slight deviations based on personal preference. It can even be argued that going beyond the hearable range allows for a better response (some cans even go up to 50k, including the revered Audeze, various HiFiMan cans, and the legendary HD600 goes to 40k)).

Noise cancelling is done through introducing sound waves to the spectrum, this can strongly affect the accuracy of what is heard and should not be used in an actual studio. If you are looking to hear what your listeners are going to hear, the response should be as flat as possible with no additions. This is why the outside noise interference is generally handled through sound isolation in the studio itself.

I am also of the opinion that a pair of cans is incapable of relating the true experience of the low frequencies. Many of them are felt by the body as well as the ears, especially the lower it goes. It is not possible to replicate this experience through headphones. You can even use sound waves in this way to influence the listeners experience, but not through the ears solely.
edit on 4-8-2014 by Serdgiam because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 06:52 PM
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a reply to: Serdgiam

Well, my Audio Technica headphones have shaken my ribcage before, but I've learned to work really well with heavier than even mainstream basslines that don't muffle other instruments.

Also, noise cancelling can be done through the acoustics, if there is a reall tight seal from the earphone pad, it can noise cancel without using additional frequencies.

I always produce with flat equalizer on my pc or headphones. I used to boost bass and treble, but once I gained more experience, I realized the bass and treble would lack on a flat system.

Also, I realize the wire is what produces good sound quality. I do believe my Audio Technicas are copper, with aluminum coating, while using rare magnets to stop any external feedback.

*Edit* I once challenged myself to make a hip-hop beat where for sections of the song, the only bassline present was in the 25-35hz range, so you dont hear it, but feel it. My headphones actually gave me the same sensation as being on a particularly mysterious hallucinogenic: a nice bodily tingle.
edit on 0148k3 by Lynk3 because: (no reason given)
edit on 0148k3 by Lynk3 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 5 2014 @ 09:47 AM
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originally posted by: Lynk3
a reply to: Serdgiam

Well, my Audio Technica headphones have shaken my ribcage before, but I've learned to work really well with heavier than even mainstream basslines that don't muffle other instruments.


Its a much deeper topic than just "shaking ribcages." ELF are even frequently responsible for perceptions like strong EM field.


Also, noise cancelling can be done through the acoustics, if there is a reall tight seal from the earphone pad, it can noise cancel without using additional frequencies.


That would be called isolation and not cancellation.
Cancellation is an active process as the name suggests.


I always produce with flat equalizer on my pc or headphones. I used to boost bass and treble, but once I gained more experience, I realized the bass and treble would lack on a flat system.


Getting flat response through the basic hardware is vastly superior than through software, or even adding in additional hardware EQ's. The reasons for this are numerous.


Also, I realize the wire is what produces good sound quality. I do believe my /Audio Technicas are copper, with aluminum coating, while using rare magnets to stop any external feedback.


All parts that run the electrical signal through them are equally important. The wire itself is on the lower end of the priority with digital signals though. Pure analog signals will rely more on wire quality in relation to sound quality. That said, the relevant parameter on the wire would be oxygen content and material purity.


*Edit* I once challenged myself to make a hip-hop beat where for sections of the song, the only bassline present was in the 25-35hz range, so you dont hear it, but feel it. My headphones actually gave me the same sensation as being on a particularly mysterious hallucinogenic: a nice bodily tingle.


Someone with the right set up would hear that signal as well as feel it. It is at the very upper limit of ELF waves, which run from 3hz to 30hz. The lower limit for hearable frequencies is right around 20hz, but that will vary by individual and hardware. In other words, if you were using a proper studio setup, you would hear that signal. Your listeners who DO have such a setup are probably hearing completely different music than you! If you do not distribute through FLAC, etc. its probably not that relevant though.

If you would like assistance setting things up, let me know. I have set up professional studios and dedicated listening rooms many times, considering it was my business.
edit on 5-8-2014 by Serdgiam because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 5 2014 @ 02:21 PM
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a reply to: Serdgiam

Well, I'm just starting out. You lost me only at FLAC, though. But I never knew isolation and cancellation were specific terms for different things. All of the headphones say noise cancellation instead of isolation when talking about blocking sound outside the headphones.



posted on Aug, 5 2014 @ 02:55 PM
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originally posted by: Lynk3
a reply to: Serdgiam

Well, I'm just starting out. You lost me only at FLAC, though. But I never knew isolation and cancellation were specific terms for different things. All of the headphones say noise cancellation instead of isolation when talking about blocking sound outside the headphones.



Marketing is frequently disconnected from the people actually making the technology, and the technology itself.

Cancellation is usually achieved by introducing white noise along with the signal that directly cancels external sound waves. Isolation means the listening environment is isolated from external interference. Really though, its just semantics, but it is good to know there are multiple ways to acheive the same goal. Both can work extremely well, but there are applications that are better suited to one or the other.

I wasn't trying to lose you anywhere, just trying to cover the basics. FLAC is a lossless digital audio format. Large file sizes, but great audio quality. There are a few others that can offer the same quality. Analog is always an option too, and is making a comeback.

In a studio, the main goal should be isolation and full, flat, accurate reproduction of the signal. Personal preference of sound signatures shouldn't be particularly relevant.



posted on Aug, 5 2014 @ 06:10 PM
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a reply to: Serdgiam

Ah, see, I don't record live instruments. I make synths using Vsts in FL Studios to sound as realistic as possible. But I like .wav for now. All I really have (no job), is a couple good mics (shure pg58, at-2020 xlr condenser), preamp, limited recording interface, and a keyboard/midi controller. But since I don't rap much anymore (learning production values first), i just mainly do everything by mouse.

And the noise cancellation you mentioned, is it similar to dithering? I don't have much ear training experience because I've only been going super hard work mode with sound engineering for a few months, but I can already hear white noise. I can hear a pin drop on a busy road 200 feet away though.






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