Headphones adapters - am I losing my mind?

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posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 07:07 AM
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Headphones. Use em a lot. Always have.

For TV, hi-fi, lap top.

Shopping for a decent set can be a bugger; you need a degree in technology these days to sift through all the latest variety of state-of-the-art cans.

But once you've made your choice, made your purchase, brought them home, plug in...happiness.

The only really important issue is making sure the adapter is the right fit for the socket.

This has never been a problem, since there are only two sizes of adapters/sockets - the big one and the little one (ie 6.3mm and 3.5mm respectively).

Someone please tell me...is there a third size??

Because the last two or three sets of headphones I've bought haven't actually fit snugly into the socket, despite both adapter and socket being the small variety (ie the 3.5mm size); the socket seems too big now for the adapter.

So I'm getting sound through one ear only, or else it's through both ears but barely audible, or I can hear the music fine, but can't hear the singer or the lead guitar break.

If I twiddle the thing around delicately enough inside the socket, I can get perfect playback; but the slightest movement will mess it up again.

Please tell me it's not just me?




posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 07:15 AM
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My cell phone has a different size of headphone socket. Cant remember what the dimentions are tho.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 07:16 AM
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a reply to: CJCrawley

I know nothing about them really but I'll share one piece of advice; if you get the ones you stick in your actual ear make sure they aren't the rubberized ones (that block sound and shape-to-fit). I never had ear problems in my life 'til I used those for a month, they compress ear wax deep in your ear and it can be agony!



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 07:21 AM
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a reply to: CJCrawley

A very good question. I'm looking to some decent info here on that topic.

I've recently had the same problem with plugging into a new phone and older TV. I tried a couple of different sets of earphones. I assumed it was the earphone in that they were either an existing set i attempted to use or a simply a cheap set that I purchased recently.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 07:21 AM
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As far as I am aware you also get a 2.5mm jack.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 07:29 AM
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a reply to: CJCrawley



The phone connector was invented for use in telephone switchboards in the 19th century and is still widely used. In its original configuration, the outside diameter of the "sleeve" conductor is 1⁄4 inch (exactly 6.35 mm). The "mini" connector has a diameter of 3.5 mm (approx. 1⁄8 inch) and the "sub-mini" connector has a diameter of 2.5 mm (approx. 3⁄32 inch).





Wiki
edit on 3-8-2014 by Hellas because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 07:30 AM
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modern ones comes in three sizes according to wiki

Phone connector

2.5mm
3.5mm
6.35mm



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 07:34 AM
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They are bad for your ears anyway, best to use speakers.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 08:19 AM
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Seems the more monopolistic companies become the less adaptability there is. Lots like wall transformers.

If you can't generate their specific voltage you don't run their device.

According to Deadseraph there are currently four adapter types for sound output.

Waiting for when each new in the box is only usable on that companies products.

Gotcha…

Back to the store to buy their adapter for only 22.95.

So sorry, those are on backorder.

Isn't commerce grand?



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 08:54 AM
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If a two-conductor plug of the same size is connected to a three-conductor socket, the result is that the ring (right channel) of the socket is grounded. This property is deliberately used in several applications, see "tip ring sleeve", below. However, grounding one channel may also be dangerous to the equipment if the result is to short circuit the output of the right channel amplifier. In any case, any signal from the right channel is naturally lost. If a three-conductor plug is connected to a two-conductor socket, normally the result is to leave the ring of the plug unconnected (open circuit).
en.wikipedia.org...

Now, is this the problem?

I'm sure no one gives a second's thought as to whether the plug and socket are compatible in terms of whether they are both two-conductor or three-conductor etc.

It says nothing at all about this on the headphones box.

I suppose you are meant to carry on buying headphones till you get lucky and find one that is compatible with the socket you use.

Profit margins, it's all good.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 09:49 AM
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try bt headset great sound quality and no wires to get tangled up with ..



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 09:51 AM
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originally posted by: EnigmaAgent
My cell phone has a different size of headphone socket. Cant remember what the dimentions are tho.


3.5 is standard on mobiles and tablets ..



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 10:06 AM
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You didn't ask, but I suggest a set of Fostex T20RP modded with a few things. IMO, the best you can get for under $300us.

Everyone has covered the sizes and conductors, but the socket itself might be busted too. Just throwing out possible issues.

I STRONGLY suggest using monoprice.com for any adapter needs, cables as well. You can get 2.5mm -> 3.5mm adapters for 38 cents + shipping.

Linky



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 11:04 AM
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Start saving up for hearing aids now. Using headphones so much will add up to major hearing damage over time, even if you don't crank the volume. Your ears weren't designed for this. All it takes is one exposure to an extra-loud sound, and damage is done, and it's cumulative. Having it right up against your ears like that guarantees volume overload, if only accidentally once in a while.

And I'm not talking hearing aids at 80, but at 40.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 01:12 PM
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originally posted by: signalfire
Start saving up for hearing aids now. Using headphones so much will add up to major hearing damage over time, even if you don't crank the volume. Your ears weren't designed for this. All it takes is one exposure to an extra-loud sound, and damage is done, and it's cumulative. Having it right up against your ears like that guarantees volume overload, if only accidentally once in a while.

And I'm not talking hearing aids at 80, but at 40.


Only if you listen to them loud all the time. I've used headphones all my life, as well as a few close friends of mine. I'm the only one with any hearing loss(my hearing is good, but not great), and that is due to the loud factory I used to work in. Both of my friends have excellent hearing in their 50's. Not saying it can't happen, just saying good common sense is a must. Cranking the volume on cans isn't good common sense.

BTW. AKG 240s. In their price range, there is no competition.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 01:30 PM
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a reply to: Klassified

Having upgraded from a pair of 240's, I stand by my assertion that the modded Fostex is superior. Of course, they also have different sound signatures and that part is all subjective. I did think the 240's were better when compared stock though, and I love the looks of the AKG line!

I agree with all of the rest, headphones are no more damaging than anything else when listening at reasonable volumes.
edit on 3-8-2014 by Serdgiam because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 03:43 PM
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a reply to: Serdgiam

Actually, the best for under $300 would be Audio Technica M50s. To a trained ear, they're high quality studio monitor headphones. To an untrained ear, they're better than Dre Beats solos/studios. The headphones also come with the 6.5mm jack as a screw on/off attachment.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 04:15 PM
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i have a good tip for making headphones last longer.
tie a loop in the wire, so when you inevitably sit on the wire, it just pulls the loop tight instead of yanking the wires from the solder.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 11:02 PM
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a reply to: Lynk3

I also have a pair of those (or did), and stand by my statement.

Beats shouldn't come up in the conversation, ever.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 07:16 AM
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a reply to: Serdgiam

Beats Pro, ($500) are worth the talk, but the rest are for flashy listening.
And I'll have to check out the AKG 240s then. My main thing is as long as the frequency range is 20hz-20k hz, I'm good. I run into a lot of studio monitoring equipment that only goes down to 40hz, but the rumble in a sub bass is around 25-35hz, and can cause muffled production, or distortion if not eq'd right.

Edit: Read all the details. 15hz-25khz range. Sold on that. All the other specifications were icing on the cake. And copper is always great for sound. I also like the one ear capability, the ATH-M50s dont have that.

The downside to them, however, is they are not noise cancelling, and I need that because I live on a main road and I have noisy pets. They would be great as an extra monitoring tool though.

edit on 0148k3 by Lynk3 because: (no reason given)
edit on 0148k3 by Lynk3 because: (no reason given)





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