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Genesis 1:26 An interesting verse that is easy to debate over

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posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 09:11 PM
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originally posted by: Wanderer777
Okay so when reading the Genesis you come across a verse that'll make you scratch your head. Or you'll miss the subtlety entirely and keep reading. Here's the verse:
“Let us make man in our image, after our likeness. And let them have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the heavens and over the livestock and over all the earth and over every creeping thing that creeps on the earth.” Genesis 1:26

So who's "us" and "our"?
I have a strong opinion as to that question, but I would like to see what others think first. Please let's keep this civil because I'm deployed at the moment and have little patience for arguing. Also if we can have people who believe in the Bible 100%. Cant wait to see what y'all have to say. God Bless!

Also I didn't search for this because I'd like a fresh discussion.


1Th_5:23 And the very God of peace sanctify you wholly; and I pray God your whole spirit and soul and body be preserved blameless unto the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.

Humans are made comprising a body, a soul, and a spirit...A 'trinity'...God is comprised of a Trinity; the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit...One God but 3 persons...That Trinity is what we humans are made in the image of...




posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 11:45 PM
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I opened up one of the Bible commentaries that I have of the NKJV, and I will give you the direct quote from this book. This i a relatively good explanation from a Biblical point of view. " (Let us Make) is emphatic. It emphasizes the majesty of the speaker. Furthermore, the use of a plural for God allows for the later revelation of the Trinity (see Gen 11:7, Matt 28:19). The "Us" cannot refer to the angels that are present with God because man is made in the image of God alone, not also that of the angels. What is the image of God in man? The traditional view is that God's image is certain moral, ethical, and intellectual abilities. A more recent view, based on Hebrew grammar and the knowledge of the ancient Middle East, interprets the phrase as meaning "Let us make man as our image." (The Hebrew preposition in this phrase can be translated as.) In ancient times an emperor might command statues of himself to be placed in remote parts of his empire. These symbols would declare that these areas were under his power and reign. So God placed humankind as living symbols of Himself on earth to represent His reign.

This interpretation fits well with the command that follows- to reign over all that God has made. "According to our likeness" draws attention to the preceding figure of speech. Since God is Spirit (John 4:24), there can be no "image" or "likeness" of Him in the normal sense of these words. Indeed, image-making was later strongly prohibited because of the clear ties that has with idolatry."

It goes on to discuss the idea that people are in God's likeness, and how God values people, and how we rule as God's agents on earth. And how people are to rule wisely and prudently, etc...I took the OP to mean that this was a conversation about religion, specifically the Hebrew Old Testament view of creation. Thus why I focused strictly on answers from a Biblical point of view. Why are people getting on here and obviously taking the thread in a completely different direction? You don't have to believe something to argue from the source material detailing that thing.
edit on 8/3/14 by JiggyPotamus because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 11:57 PM
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a reply to: graphuto

First of all the scripture I posted was not confusing at all. If it confused you then maybe you should read more. I am having a spiritual debate. Your statements only verify the Holy Trinity it proves nothing of the original scripture I posted. It has the same validity as what I said. Why? Because we weren't there and there are nearly an infinite amount of interpretations because it is the Bible. The Bible has been debated since its creation and it will continue to be debated until the glorious day when Jesus comes back.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 11:59 PM
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originally posted by: graphuto

originally posted by: Wanderer777
a reply to: Boscov
The biggest thing we all need to get on the same page about is unconditional love. That was Jesus' biggest teaching... As long as you love everyone and don't judge and have Christ in your heart you're good to go.


Blasphemy or willful ignorance. The biggest teaching of Jesus is that the Pharisees and Jews were doing it all wrong, caught up in tons of man made rules, and following the letter of the law without faith. God is love, yes, but he isn't all lovey dovey like people who clearly don't know the Bible make Him out to be. (Maybe more accurate to say "wish Him to be") He is also just. And jealous. And angry!


No I said Jesus' teachings not God. Everything you said of the Father was accurate, but Jesus taught love and compassion the most. Look at everything he does. "Forgive them Father they know not what they do"
His whole sacrifice was love and compassion



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 05:55 AM
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originally posted by: Wanderer777
a reply to: graphuto

Yes but God doesn't refer to himself as we in any other part of the Bible. The word was with God but the word isn't part of the Trinity. It's simply the word.


The Word is part of the Trinity because the Word is Jesus.

John 1:14 - And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us, (and we beheld his glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father,) full of grace and truth.

www.gotquestions.org...



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 06:01 AM
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originally posted by: Wanderer777
a reply to: graphuto

The word was still a part of God. It was not made into Flesh until that time. Jesus (The Word) came from God but he was not there until God created Him from the Word.


Jesus is the Word, he was already with God in the beginning. Jesus said, just like God did in the Old Testament, that he was the Alpha and Omega, the First and the Last.

edit on 4-8-2014 by Deetermined because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 06:25 AM
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originally posted by: Wanderer777

originally posted by: graphuto

originally posted by: Wanderer777
a reply to: Boscov
The biggest thing we all need to get on the same page about is unconditional love. That was Jesus' biggest teaching... As long as you love everyone and don't judge and have Christ in your heart you're good to go.


Blasphemy or willful ignorance. The biggest teaching of Jesus is that the Pharisees and Jews were doing it all wrong, caught up in tons of man made rules, and following the letter of the law without faith. God is love, yes, but he isn't all lovey dovey like people who clearly don't know the Bible make Him out to be. (Maybe more accurate to say "wish Him to be") He is also just. And jealous. And angry!


No I said Jesus' teachings not God. Everything you said of the Father was accurate, but Jesus taught love and compassion the most. Look at everything he does. "Forgive them Father they know not what they do"
His whole sacrifice was love and compassion


Wanderer, you appear to miss the greatest mystery of the Bible as well as the basic tenet of Christianity, which is that Jesus IS God. He's just one aspect of the whole self which includes love, forgiveness and wrath. Remember, Jesus will return with wrath. He's not separate from God and is not only capable of showing love and compassion.

ETA: Iscool said it best when he/she said that we were created in God's image by having a body, soul, and spirit. Trinity.

edit on 4-8-2014 by Deetermined because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 7 2014 @ 09:59 AM
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originally posted by: Wanderer777
Okay so when reading the Genesis you come across a verse that'll make you scratch your head. Or you'll miss the subtlety entirely and keep reading. Here's the verse:
“Let us make man in our image, after our likeness. And let them have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the heavens and over the livestock and over all the earth and over every creeping thing that creeps on the earth.” Genesis 1:26

So who's "us" and "our"?
I have a strong opinion as to that question, but I would like to see what others think first. Please let's keep this civil because I'm deployed at the moment and have little patience for arguing. Also if we can have people who believe in the Bible 100%. Cant wait to see what y'all have to say. God Bless!

Also I didn't search for this because I'd like a fresh discussion.

In the Genesis God is called Elohim (in Hebrew the termination of words with "him" implies a plural).
In some instances in the original Book of Genesis (Bere#) God is called "Yehova Elohim" ( I don't have the reference right now, but as soon as I get it I'll let you know). Possible meaning: "this guy (Yehova) of this group (Elohim)"? Or it could be many of His attributes.



posted on Aug, 7 2014 @ 01:06 PM
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originally posted by: Wanderer777
a reply to: graphuto

Yes but God doesn't refer to himself as we in any other part of the Bible. The word was with God but the word isn't part of the Trinity. It's simply the word.

God is the Word, that Word is a verb, representing action. God is the beginning of everything. God is action, constantly evolving. We see it every day. People die, others are borne, the world revolves around the sun, the sun around the galaxy and the galaxy around something else.
The Word is part of the Trinity, but not everybody understand the real nature of the Trinity. Is beyond our understanding, we can just scratch the surface. (But for that we need a cup of wine and a nice cigar)



posted on Aug, 7 2014 @ 01:13 PM
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originally posted by: Wanderer777
Okay so when reading the Genesis you come across a verse that'll make you scratch your head. Or you'll miss the subtlety entirely and keep reading. Here's the verse:
“Let us make man in our image, after our likeness. And let them have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the heavens and over the livestock and over all the earth and over every creeping thing that creeps on the earth.” Genesis 1:26

So who's "us" and "our"?
I have a strong opinion as to that question, but I would like to see what others think first. Please let's keep this civil because I'm deployed at the moment and have little patience for arguing. Also if we can have people who believe in the Bible 100%. Cant wait to see what y'all have to say. God Bless!

Also I didn't search for this because I'd like a fresh discussion.


All of heaven

OFFTOPIC: there is no trinity per se. The compartments of the trinity do exist, but this whole godhead 3 in 1 trinity concept is just a mesh of roman culture blended into Christianity to win converts and secure nationalistic interests.
edit on 7-8-2014 by DelayedChristmas because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 11 2014 @ 04:00 AM
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Read the Eridu Genesis



posted on Aug, 11 2014 @ 05:34 AM
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a reply to: Wanderer777

In Genesis 1, Elohim creates a perfect environment for life. Mankind is BOTH male and female. They possess both traits. In Genesis 2, YHVH creates and splits man into male and female. He then restricts the garden fruit. There are no restrictions from Elohim. The image idea comes from the facts about the Father, Mother and Son.

In Hebrew, the word Father is Aleph Bet (Abba), or letters of creation. Mother is Aleph Mem, or water of creation. Son is Bet Nun (Ben), or house of seed. Letters are put inside the mother as the catalyst (Womb / Matrix). Just like DNA is passed to the mother, then the son is born, so the US in Genesis is the Father and Mother. From the Son, everything is created. The Son is the WORD, or what is written with the letters.

Colossians 1

15 The Son is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn over all creation. 16 For in him all things were created: things in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or powers or rulers or authorities; all things have been created through him and for him. 17 He is before all things, and in him all things hold together. 18 And he is the head of the body, the church; he is the beginning and the firstborn from among the dead, so that in everything he might have the supremacy. 19 For God was pleased to have all his fullness dwell in him, 20 and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether things on earth or things in heaven, by making peace through his blood, shed on the cross.



posted on Aug, 11 2014 @ 07:07 PM
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The usual Christian response is:

1) God was talking to Jesus, of course.
2) God was talking to his angels.
3) God is really three different things so he was just talking to himself.

Later when the Tower of Babel is discussed in Genesis, first person plural pronouns are used again.

Actually, the word "Elohim" itself is plural. "God" in Hebrew is "El," which is also the Canaanite word for a specific deity. The word "Elohim" according to Hebrew grammatical rules literally means "gods," in the plural. Christians and Jews both have theological explanations for why this is the case.

The typical non-theological argument is usually:

1) This is a grammatical artifact carried over from the earlier texts from which Genesis was originally copied.


Some scholars believe that the Jews first came across the Genesis account in its polytheistic form during the exile in Babylon, where many Jews were employed as scribes, copying and translating various ancient texts that the Babylonians kept in their royal libraries.





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