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Despite extensive analysis, Fermi bubbles defy explanation

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posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 02:20 AM
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This article is something totally new.... I would not have been surprised if two huge jets of gamma rays were extending out from the center of the galaxy as some huge black hole gorged on unlucky matter close by, however, these findings were something unexpected. Probably very few will be interested yet I found the article and Pics ..... Interesting...


(Phys.org) —Scientists from Stanford and the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have analyzed more than four years of data from NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, along with data from other experiments, to create the most detailed portrait yet of two towering bubbles that stretch tens of thousands of light-years above and below our galaxy.



For example, the outlines of the bubbles are quite sharp, and the bubbles themselves glow in nearly uniform gamma rays over their colossal surfaces, like two 30,000-light-year-tall incandescent bulbs screwed into the center of the galaxy.

Their size is another puzzle. The farthest reaches of the Fermi bubbles boast some of the highest energy gamma rays, but there's no discernable cause for them that far from the galaxy.
Read more at: phys.org...




posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 02:50 AM
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This article is something totally new

It's not exactly new, i read about it some years ago after being posted here on ATS (too lazy to find the thread), but that doesn't make it less interesting, and i find it amazing that they can read data showing these bubbles when removing all unnecessary data.

I just wish that we could see more from space with our own eye's instead of the constant Artist representation pic, so much invisible beauty....
edit on 3-8-2014 by Mianeye because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 03:09 AM
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a reply to: Mianeye
Imagine how far away we'd have to be to capture such a view ...



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 03:19 AM
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a reply to: Snarl

True, wouldn't it be wonderful to be so far away, just enjoying the "view", silence and unknown destination...I hate this prison called Earth...



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 03:24 AM
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a reply to: Mianeye

Then there's that damned galactic barrier


I don't think even Spock found a way around that.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 03:33 AM
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My guess is that there is a rotating black hole at the center of the galaxy, and that the magnetic field poles are off-axis by 30 to 40 degrees. Then everything that gets accelerated along those paths forms bubbles. The highest energies would be at furtherest distance.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 03:58 AM
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I have no explanation other than we may be living in part of a childs hopper toy




posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 04:02 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

looks similar to David Allen LaPoint's "The Primer Fields"



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 10:34 AM
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Looks like a basic magnetic field. Shouldn't be too surprised



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 12:30 PM
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originally posted by: Snarl
a reply to: Mianeye
Imagine how far away we'd have to be to capture such a view ...


Ahh what I wouldn't give for Andromeda's perspective, just for an hour!



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 12:34 PM
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It's God.



Sorry, had to.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 12:48 PM
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a reply to: lightedhype

It's the polyps of a god...or a lollipop pair.

It's a polypsistic Universe.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 07:42 PM
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a reply to: 727Sky

Since it emanates above and below the ecliptic, it probably has something to do with gravity and/or magnetic fields that are related to the structure of the entire galaxy itself. Think fractally.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 10:07 PM
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The electric universe guys had a very good explanation for the bubbles and showed lab experiments. I'm looking for the article on their site right now. It's on thunderbolts.info somewhere.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 11:43 PM
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originally posted by: Snarl
a reply to: Mianeye

Then there's that damned galactic barrier


I don't think even Spock found a way around that.
The Q dropped it after the renegade Q posing as everyone's God got killed in that movie. Come to think of it Spock is the one that got him.





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