Russia pulls plug on 'last independent TV show'

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posted on Aug, 5 2014 @ 10:20 PM
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originally posted by: DJW001
Does anyone else here find the idea of censoring the news to "protect" people a blatant attempt to turn adults into infants?



Anyone who thinks the Kremlin has the ability to infantilise a nation of people like the russians needs their head examined.

But if you think the west has the ability to indoctrinate a significant number in this underpopulated nation with lies, infactual spin, loose rhetoric & pretentious anti Kremlin views youre a good observer because thats what is likely to be been happening..

ETA: Have been happening*
edit on 5-8-2014 by funkadeliaaaa because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 5 2014 @ 10:36 PM
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originally posted by: funkadeliaaaa

originally posted by: DJW001
Does anyone else here find the idea of censoring the news to "protect" people a blatant attempt to turn adults into infants?



Anyone who thinks the Kremlin has the ability to infantilise a nation of people like the russians needs their head examined.

But if you think the west has the ability to indoctrinate a significant number in this underpopulated nation with lies, infactual spin, loose rhetoric & pretentious anti Kremlin views youre a good observer because thats what is likely to be been happening..

ETA: Have been happening*


English is not your native language, is it?



posted on Aug, 5 2014 @ 10:40 PM
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originally posted by: funkadeliaaaa

originally posted by: BornAgainAlien

originally posted by: Xcathdra

originally posted by: funkadeliaaaa
But i don't think the Kremlin will get anywhere near as bad as it was in the soviet era.


With absolute control of the Russian media no one will know, just as it was during the soviet era.


So from now on, we all know, all anti-Russia news will be merely propaganda...

Time for you to focus on other subjects.


Your comments have the vitality of a wet fish flapping around on concrete.


I was just explaining to Xcathdra what his remark, "With absolute control of the Russian media no one will know, just as it was during the soviet era," had for consequences for him if he believed that.

It had nothing to do with my personal opinion, (and for the ones who believe the same (same as the Xcathdra remark), same consequences apply, others can still bash away all they want)...but I can keep it all more a bit simple if needed, sorry if I made it a bit too confusing, I assume maybe to easily people are able to make those connections.



posted on Aug, 5 2014 @ 11:17 PM
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a reply to: DJW001

Well even if it wasn't you would still be faced with the incontrovertible validity of my reasoning.



posted on Aug, 5 2014 @ 11:37 PM
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a reply to: funkadeliaaaa

No. Just no. If you want someone else to determine what you are allowed to know, you have abandoned your rights as an adult.



posted on Aug, 5 2014 @ 11:49 PM
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a reply to: DJW001

No, age is no a factor.



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 12:41 AM
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originally posted by: funkadeliaaaa
a reply to: DJW001

No, age is no a factor.


Never mind.



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 12:57 AM
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Russia Threatens To Restrict Access To BBC Website Over Interview

A Prime Example -



MOSCOW, Aug 5 (Reuters) - Russia is threatening to restrict access to the BBC's Russian language website after the British broadcaster refused to remove an interview with an activist branded by Moscow as an extremist.

The Kremlin has steadily tightened its grip on local media during the rule of President Vladimir Putin since 2000, but Western media have remained largely unaffected by this trend.

A move to block the BBC website would be a rare example of direct Russian government interference in the work of Western media. The spat comes amid rising tensions between the West and Russia over the conflict in Ukraine and the imposition of sanctions on Moscow by the United States and the European Union.

Russia's communications watchdog said it might limit access to the website because of an interview with Artyom Loskutov.

Loskutov upset Moscow by calling for a rally in the Siberian city of Novosibirsk to press for "federalisation" - greater political and economic autonomy - for oil-rich Siberia, under the slogan "Stop feeding Moscow".

The BBC said access had already been restricted in Russia. However, the interview was still available in Moscow on Tuesday for downloading. ( www.bbc.co.uk... )

In a statement, the BBC said: "We have no plans to remove this interview from our website. Mr Loskutov is an artist and activist known for organizing events which are, at first sight, parodies of political activity, but which also bring out serious issues about life in Russia."

Even though Loskutov's planned protest was unlikely to draw large-scale public interest, the authorities banned it on the grounds that it contained provocative slogans that could incite mass riots.

"Federalisation" is a sensitive concept for Moscow.

While Russia is already a federation, political power is heavily centralized in practice, with the president maintaining broad powers to influence regional governor appointments.


Click link for remainder of article...


Ironic... Its ok for Russia to push Federalism on Ukraine yet apparently you cannot talk about it in Russia.

The Democratic People's Republic of Korea, The Peoples Republic of China, The Republic of Cuba, The Russian Federation...

All in name only....



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 01:09 AM
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a reply to: Xcathdra

United states of America.. India..China Myanmar, Thailand, Iraq, United kingdom, Pakistan



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 01:23 AM
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originally posted by: funkadeliaaaa
a reply to: Xcathdra

United states of America.. India..China Myanmar, Thailand, Iraq, United kingdom, Pakistan


The point of my post was to demonstrate countries who in name claim to be something they are not.

Whats your point?



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 01:34 AM
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a reply to: Xcathdra

Countries who claim they are countries when they are in fact conglomerates.
Russia is not, however is not ostensibly conglomerate, considering the majority of russias inhabitants are ethnic russians, and have been for thousands of years....



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 01:49 AM
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originally posted by: funkadeliaaaa
a reply to: Xcathdra

Countries who claim they are countries when they are in fact conglomerates.
Russia is not, however is not ostensibly conglomerate, considering the majority of russias inhabitants are ethnic russians, and have been for thousands of years....


Seriously? What about all the Jews, Kazakhs, Chechens, Eskimos, etc...?



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 06:07 AM
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a reply to: DJW001

Do they speak Russian? (the eskimos)
Have they lived there for hundreds of years?
You listed three minority groups. (Eskimos are ethnic Russians)
Jews, Chechens & Khazaks. 3.

Come back when you have a real argument.



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 09:49 AM
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originally posted by: funkadeliaaaa
a reply to: DJW001

Do they speak Russian? (the eskimos)
Have they lived there for hundreds of years?
You listed three minority groups. (Eskimos are ethnic Russians)
Jews, Chechens & Khazaks. 3.

Come back when you have a real argument.


Once again, you are not making any sense. What does Russia's diverse ethnic composition have to do with their fundamental human rights? Aren't Tatars and Cossacks entitled to be informed as well as Rus and Slavs?



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 10:07 AM
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originally posted by: funkadeliaaaa
Countries who claim they are countries when they are in fact conglomerates.


Like Crimea? The DPR? Chechnya, Russia, etc etc etc



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 10:43 AM
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a reply to: Xcathdra

Different ball park, different ball games.



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 10:59 AM
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originally posted by: funkadeliaaaa
a reply to: Xcathdra

Different ball park, different ball games.


What does this have to do with Putin's government robbing the Russian people of their human rights?



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 10:38 PM
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originally posted by: funkadeliaaaa
a reply to: Xcathdra

Different ball park, different ball games.


Not really, no.

Although one can understand why certain people desperately wish it could be.
edit on 6-8-2014 by Xcathdra because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 8 2014 @ 05:21 PM
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Another change...

Russia demands Internet users show ID to access public Wifi


MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russia further tightened its control of the Internet on Friday, requiring people using public Wifi hotspots provide identification, a policy that prompted anger from bloggers and confusion among telecom operators on how it would work.

The decree, signed by Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev on July 31 but published online on Friday, also requires companies to declare who is using their web networks. The legislation caught many in the industry by surprise and companies said it was not clear how it would be enforced.

A flurry of new laws regulating Russia's once freewheeling Internet has been condemned by President Vladimir Putin's critics as a crackdown on dissent, after the websites of two of his prominent foes were blocked this year.

Putin, who alarmed industry leaders in April by saying the Internet is "a CIA project", says the laws are needed to fight "extremism" and "terrorism."

Communications Minister Nikolai Nikiforov said that demanding ID from Internet users was normal. "Identification of users (via bank cards, cell phone numbers, etc.) with access to public Wifi is a worldwide practice," he tweeted.

A pro-Kremlin lawmaker said the measure was needed to prevent Cold War-style propaganda attacks against Russia.


click link for remainder of article..


The Press in the Third Reich

What excuses did the Nazi's use to justify media control?


During the first weeks of 1933, the Nazi regime deployed the radio, press, and newsreels to stoke fears of a pending “Communist uprising,” then channeled popular anxieties into political measures that eradicated civil liberties and democracy. SA (storm troopers) and members of the Nazi elite paramilitary formation, the SS, took to the streets to brutalize or arrest political opponents and incarcerate them in hastily established detention centers and concentration camps. Nazi thugs broke into opposing political party offices, destroying printing presses and newspapers.




The Propaganda Ministry aimed further to control the content of news and editorial pages through directives distributed in daily conferences in Berlin and transmitted via the Party propaganda offices to regional or local papers. Detailed guidelines stated what stories could or could not be reported and how to report the news. Journalists or editors who failed to follow these instructions could be fired or, if believed to be acting with intent to harm Germany, sent to a concentration camp. Rather than suppressing news, the Nazi propaganda apparatus instead sought to tightly control its flow and interpretation and to deny access to alternative sources of news.


edit on 8-8-2014 by Xcathdra because: (no reason given)
edit on 8-8-2014 by Xcathdra because: (no reason given)
edit on 8-8-2014 by Xcathdra because: (no reason given)





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