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IT'S SPREADING: Liberian dies in Morocco of Ebola

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posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 03:15 PM
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a reply to: eNaR

In nature, the 'herd' often gets culled without the assistance of a plan.

Just sayin'


edit on 3-8-2014 by loam because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 03:22 PM
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a reply to: VashKonnor

The CDC along with other aid organizations are fully aware of the cultural nuances of the populations that allow the pathogen to spread. How in the world does bringing it here help them?



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 03:29 PM
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originally posted by: Witness2008
a reply to: Tarzan the apeman.

Good question. I found this....

Mosquito and insect bites as well as flies, mice, and cockroaches coming in contact with an Ebola symptom bearer, and also coming in contact with a healthy person have also shown to be a direct means of fluid contacts. The indirect fluid contact involves sneezing or coughing in the face of a healthy person by a symptom bearer. Contaminated equipment at health centers treating Ebola victims can also transmit virus to a healthy person.

theliberiandialogue.org...

I wonder what the mosquito population is in Atlanta this time of year?



HIGH very high in the whole south.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 03:34 PM
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originally posted by: AeternusLux
a reply to: loam
Not sure if my belongs here but I don't see a more relevant thread, and I am too new as a member of ATS to post my own.

In any case, to the many points raised by people on multiple ebola threads here, with regards to controlling the influx of the disease, I for one was dismayed at seeing this in the news this morning:




(CNN) — A retired American doctor who was working with Ebola patients in West Africa returned to the United States — and put himself in quarantine.

Dr. Alan Jamison volunteered in the Liberian capital of Monrovia this month as part of an international medical group. He returned to the United States on July 25, according to Medical Teams International, the organization he worked with.

MTI declined to discuss details of how Jamison traveled back to the United States, including whether he was on a commercial flight.


Link



In the firt days of this it sounded like he flew back commercial but never a for sure answer. The lady came by military. So the pictures say.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 03:40 PM
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a reply to: judydawg

Actually, I saw him interviewed. He flew back commercial, met his daughter at the airport, and then later called the CDC announcing he was placing himself in quarantine.

I got the impression this guy was just seeking his 15 min of fame.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 03:45 PM
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originally posted by: loam
a reply to: judydawg

Actually, I saw him interviewed. He flew back commercial, met his daughter at the airport, and then later called the CDC announcing he was placing himself in quarantine.

I got the impression this guy was just seeking his 15 min of fame.


This makes me sick. Atlanta Airport is the busiest airport in the world at times. The poplation is about 3.5 million.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 03:57 PM
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originally posted by: Witness2008
a reply to: VashKonnor

The CDC along with other aid organizations are fully aware of the cultural nuances of the populations that allow the pathogen to spread. How in the world does bringing it here help them?





In the US the infected patients have access to all forms of treatment for Ebola. In Africa you might access to one, or two. People also need to remember this is happening at the same time all the other African problems are occurring. Aids didn't stop, malaria hasn't stopped, and other infections haven't stopped.

There are actually cases of people who are misdiagnosed, both positively and negatively. There are other "jungle fevers" that can pass as Ebola, but are not. Including "common cold".

In a first world country those patients can be bombarded with treatments, and since there is the danger of this outbreak being more serious than past ones, doctors are experimenting a little with the patient consent - who are doctors anyway and are aware of the risks.

From what is known, Ebola can be defeated if you reenforce all barriers that the virus attacks. You need to counter-attack the severe dehydration because that can cause ruptures inside and outside your body, starting the hemorrhaging process. So it's very important to "flood" the patient with fluids, by drinking and IV.

Then you have to "cover the holes" as they appear. You have to make the blood thinner in early stages of the infection, but in the later stages you have to do the opposite so the blood stops the hemorrhage from the inside.

There are very tricky but known steps that can be taken that can save the life of those infected. But your best chances at that are if you are in a country like the US.

Such steps in treatment are nearly impossible to achieve in Africa, especially amongst all the chaos.

I was talking to a friend earlier and they actually stopped here on their way to the States. They stopped at the Azores air base.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 04:11 PM
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a reply to: judydawg

Different doctor. Brantley came back via a special CDC designed plane specifically for infectious diseases. The plane landed at a military base and he is now in a containment unit at Emory Hospital. The guy in this article was non-symptomatic, which means he isn't contagious. He is now quarantining himself for a month to make sure he isn't infected.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 04:17 PM
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not sure if this has been mentioned but 7 cases now reported in the Phillippines -

english.cntv.cn...
edit on 3-8-2014 by Signals because: spaeling



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 04:28 PM
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a reply to: Signals

First I've seen this.

Hopefully a false alarm... Certainly one to watch.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 05:04 PM
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a reply to: Signals

the seven returned from sierra leone....one of the hot spots....we will see what happens



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 05:28 PM
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a reply to: Signals

I saw that too - there was a lady who collapsed and died getting off a flight in London from Sierra Leone as well. Apparantly she had been sweating / vomiting beforehand. Initial tests are saying negative for ebola. I know it could have been lots of things but too coincidental to me though.

I'm not sure if this is a reputable site or not but here's the story.

London Flight

editby]edit on 3-8-2014 by CINY8 because: (no reason given)

edit on 3-8-2014 by CINY8 because: (no reason given)

edit on 3-8-2014 by CINY8 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 06:00 PM
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Damn it! It's always London ... Now wait for one or two contaminated planes arriving at Heathrow...and all hell breaks loose.

In few hours it could reach CDG, LAX, JFK ...all major airports and then ... The havoc starts.
edit on 3-8-2014 by Necrose because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 06:30 PM
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Having followed with some interest this current out break of Ebola, that is going on and reading this posting there is an angle that is not spoken of here, and that being the cultural angle.

The first thing to consider is that there is a large cultural different between the countries of Africa and the rest of the world. In many of these countries, hospitals are feared, they are not trusted at all. Many believe that to go to a hospital is a death sentence. It often will violate cultural and tribal customs. And that is part of what is making this much more difficult to contain.

Another aspect that is starting to rear its ugly head is, that the very modern transportation is something that is not a blessing, but in cases of epidemics, a curse, as the plagues that cause mass death will follow those ways of travelling. So it is not surprising that this current outbreak is spreading from country to country. There is a good chance that if you look at the countries, and the cities, there is a good chance that you can follow the exact rout, via the roads.

There really is nothing sinister going on as many people would portray, no act of government, nothing mysterious, save that it is an outbreak, and that those who are infected, terrified of the hospitals are running, travelling along the roads and pathways into other countries, that are in turn starting to infect and ultimately spread this to others. The means of transmission happens to be very simple, bodily fluids, blood, spit, and often a sneeze.

The other problem is that no really knows what the carrier animal is, the source of this virus. It is suspected that bats carry this virus, but as to which species and where it originates, no one really knows.

While some fear an outbreak on the USA, and it, like so many other epidemics of the past are possible, it will only happen once. Due to the lack of a carrier animal to continue it on. So if it happens, it will hit one state, and then after it dies out, will not rear its ugly head again, until some other brilliant idiot decides that we should allow another patient that is infected on US soil again.


There is a side note to this all. If this happens, and there is an outbreak, which ever political party is in power, right now it is the democrats, it will be something that will shift them out of office, in the next few elections.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 06:37 PM
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OK so this new strain is airborne and can be spread by the common house fly, that is not good at all.
Reduced morality rate going with it but still at 60-70%, if this ever goes pandemic then .......




posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 06:40 PM
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From the London incident:




The woman, said to be 72, became ill on the gangway after she left a Gambia Bird jet with 128 passengers on board. She died in hospital on Saturday.

...

Speaking of the horrific moment the passenger collapsed, the shocked staff member added: “The woman was sweating buckets and vomiting.

“Paramedics arrived to try and help her. The next thing everybody was there… emergency crews, airfield operations, even immigration.

“They closed down the jet bridge and put the aircraft into quarantine.

“They took everyone’s details, even the guy who fuels the aircraft.”

The plane carrying the woman came from Freetown in Sierra Leone – a country with the highest number of victims from the disease.

It stopped at Banjul in The Gambia before landing in Gatwick at 8.15am on Saturday after a five-hour flight.

Public Health England tried to allay fears of an Ebola ­breakout in Britain.

It said the woman showed no ­symptoms during the flight.

Link.



The fact it hit her quickly is not a good sign.

ETA:

ATS Thread here.
edit on 3-8-2014 by loam because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 06:51 PM
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originally posted by: sdcigarpig
The first thing to consider is that there is a large cultural different between the countries of Africa and the rest of the world. In many of these countries, hospitals are feared, they are not trusted at all. Many believe that to go to a hospital is a death sentence. It often will violate cultural and tribal customs. And that is part of what is making this much more difficult to contain.


And here in the US, millions of people can't afford to even go to the doctor, let alone the hospital. Going to the hospital is a death sentence of insurmountable bills. Not to mention that people know you can catch any host of nasties in the hospital that you don't have when you walked in, so many stay away from hospitals unless they're literally bleeding out or dying. Add to that the fact that the media is saying the US has virtually zero chance of having an ebola outbreak, so very few are going to be "playing it safe" when they come down with flu symptoms (ie: the first week of ebola symptoms). Also add that many people can't afford to take a day off, especially if they can manage their symptoms with OTC meds, so they go to work sick.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 06:54 PM
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a reply to: loam

Yeah, I call BS on that part. She literally died within hours at the hospital, there's simply no way that she wasn't showing symptoms on the plane. She collapsed as soon as she got off the plane----no way in hell she was fine and dandy on the flight. And that's worrisome that the "reputable" press is lying and downplaying facts. I know it's a tabloid, but the Mirror article said passengers saw her "sweating buckets and vomiting" on the plane, which seems much more in line with collapsing after she got off.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 07:28 PM
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originally posted by: Snarl
a reply to: loam

Excellent point you bring to the forefront. You ... can't ... trust ... the ... infected.


SO what should be done..?

Should we go with Obamas executive order and take anyone with a cold away to be locked inside some crowded compound, where they will be forced to share close quarters with some who really do have the disease and thus likely never come out alive..?

This is where this is heading.

People will panic and anyone with symptoms will be a target and millions of innocent people could end up dead as a result.

It happened with the Tuberculosis outbreak in the 30's. Thousands of people who didn't even have the disease were rounded up and sent to "special", hospitals where they had to share space with people who did have it. Many never came home alive as a result.

Comments and opinions like yours are what started that off back then and turned it into a witch hunt.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 09:36 PM
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a reply to: Ironclad2000

Your retort made me laugh. You know I'm right ... and yet you fail to acknowledge the simple truth of my statement: You cannot trust the infected

To address the intellectually honest part of your reply ... A system of enforced quarantine perhaps? Nobody in ... certainly, nobody out. But, what happened? Some bleeding-heart 'medical professional' takes on risk, gets infected, regrets his initial bad decision, travels internationally for competent treatment?

If I've got to be the one ... yeah ... I'll call BS on what happened. As a microbiologist, currently employed in healthcare, working at a BSL3 certified facility, who can honestly admit our staff is not competent enough to handle even a minor epidemic outbreak ... As a guy with many friends in the epidemiology research field (which I'll leave to your imagination) who are slapping their foreheads and face palming over this gross mismanagement ... yeah ... I'd say my brief comments in-thread were appropriate, even if they weren't palatable to the sensitive segment of the readership.

Ebola is a virus. If you didn't know, there is no record of a single cure for any virus known to man which exists in modern medicine. They run their course ... and you survive ... or you don't. That is why such concerted efforts are made in the event of an outbreak. You don't put large populations at risk, because the medical community is not large enough to treat symptomatic folks at scale. This is common sense.

Oh yeah ... you do know that Tuberculosis is a bacterial infection, right? You do know _that_ can be effectively treated by modern medicine, right? Why are we comparing incident planning for bacterial and viral infections?

You mentioned "panic." Maybe that won't happen if risk management is taken seriously. Did you happen to note the investigative reporter who got past security? Have you read the reports of people who freely walked away from quarantine? Looks like a bunch of Keystone Cops if you ask me.

-Cheers < (that means I'm done with this discussion)



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