It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Ebola Patient in Atlanta Hospital

page: 50
128
<< 47  48  49    51  52  53 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 02:55 PM
link   
Anyone else hear they closed the hospital in Nigeria?

Nigeria Closes, Isolates Hospital after Ebola Death





posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 03:02 PM
link   
a reply to: MrLimpet

You can read more about Sawyer and the Hospital here.

I think the hospital reopened. Ill look for a link.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 03:40 PM
link   
a reply to: Libertygal

There's lots of filthy nursing staff, from what I've seen. Some of course are very clean.
The same way in society we have super clean freaks, and slobs. These people all get jobs. In restaurants, healthcare, etc. I cannot believe they change once they get a job that requires them to suddenly care..

I bought an ice scoop for my ice tray in my freezer. Nobody uses it, they put their filthy hands in and swirl the ice around until they can grab some. I have to keep dumping it out, cleaning it after they leave.
Same with the pump soaps I have in my home. Not being used by others. Do a test, empty it or hide it, see how many ask if there is any. Few will.

So my theory is this same ratio applies in other settings. There are simply people who do not care. It would be somebody who reads this and says I'm being stupid or OCD




edit on 3-8-2014 by violet because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 04:12 PM
link   

originally posted by: Libertygal
a reply to: lovebeck
I see nurses clean it off the patients every day, but not the floors. They throw towels over it, and tell ME, yes ME, to call housekeeping.

So, you can get off the almighty horse, I get it, 3 days a week, from real life experience. No, not even the nurses will make the patient care tech clean it up. They make ME call housekeeping.

So, no, I am not making it up, imagining it, or wishing it, I live it.

If things are different where you work, then bully for you, but that's NOT how it is where I work, and implying I said otherwise for any other reason is assinine.

Where I work, the nurses do a heck of a lot more than clean poo and urine. They titrate cardiac and insulin drips, suction vent patients, deal with feeding pumps, do hourly vital signs and glucose checks, and our parient care techs are hardly elusive. Their care load is only 6-7 patients on days, and only a couple more on nights. Most nurses only have two patients, some may be one on one, if they are critical enough.

Sorry if you work in a different environment where your housekeeping doesn't... well, housekeep, but that's not how it is where I work.

And, the only one who came even close to high heels and pervy old men.. was you.

So, shame on who, exactly?



So, I assume you're a unit secretary, or something of that sort because it's obvious, you are not a nurse...

If you were, then you would know that the housekeeping staff is not, by law, allowed to clean up large amounts of blood and body fluids. They're just not. Can they clean up the areas after the NURSE cleans it up? Yes, that is THEIR job!

I'm happy you're proud of where you work. I happen to work in one of the best hospitals in the world. One that is frequently in the news and I work in a department that IS the best in the world, for many years in a row now. It takes a bit to impress me at this point and there's only one other hospital that does that for me. I've also worked in ICU's, CVICU's, with cardiac and open heart surgery patients, the list goes on and on. And, it's the SAME everywhere! The nurse cleans up the mess, and has the unit secretary call housekeeping for the rest. Nurses delegate, we have to in order to take care of our patients. If you're so proud and see what a critical job those nurses you work with have, then why are you so bent out of shape about picking up a phone??

I am proud, too. I am also educated and experienced enough to know when someone is puffing their chest out and also know when someone is red-faced because their claims are simply, NOT true.

And, what's with the three days a week comment? You don't know my schedule, I don't know yours. Many nurses work three 12 hour shifts...Many times those turn into 14 and even 16 hour shifts...Not sure WTF your point is there, but, ask most people and they'll gladly take their 8 hour work day with scheduled one hour lunch versus a nurses work day any time. Most of us nurses are lucky to get in a bathroom break most days. In 12.5 hours. That's because we're committed to taking care of others before we take care of ourselves. Most of us, anyway.

So, how about you hop of of YOUR high horse and give it a rest.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 04:41 PM
link   
a reply to: ~Lucidity


Either he or the other male anchor or maybe the person he was interviewing also said, "This is not infectious." We were like what the hell?!


You were like "what the hell?!" because you are not a virologist.

A virologist would giggle because Dr.Gupta was saying that doctor/patient was infectious.

He wasn't.

*aaahhh gasps the audience*

That's because he hadn't reached the infectious stage of the disease, he just had the virus in him.

Tchraannn!

The other guy was just trying to correct him but got picked up by the microphone.


And when they came back from break he went into this whole nervous explanation of the difference between infectious and contagious. It was truly weird.


*rubs forehead*

An infectious disease is one that causes infections, and it can be caused by things like viruses or bacteria. However, you can be contaminated with a virus and not be infected. That's what happens in the incubation period.

Contagious means that a virus/disease actively seeks new hosts, so it develops symptoms that aid that contamination. Virus, fungus and bacteria act somewhat the same way flowers do. If they have the need to spread, they will find a way. Making you vomit, have nasty blisters that pop like with the black plague, that's the way of the virus saying "hey bro, I want to go that way".

Non-contagious are diseases that need extraordinary measures to be contagious. Like sharing a needle, transfusion using contaminated blood or unprotected sex.

You know, Dr.Gupta is a capable doctor and has a talent to talk to the average joe, you should have taken the time to absorb his knowledge instead of questioning him like you know something from a forum that a PhD doctor doesn't. Just saying.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 04:56 PM
link   

originally posted by: VashKonnor
a reply to: ~Lucidity


Either he or the other male anchor or maybe the person he was interviewing also said, "This is not infectious." We were like what the hell?!


You were like "what the hell?!" because you are not a virologist.

A virologist would giggle because Dr.Gupta was saying that doctor/patient was infectious.

He wasn't.

*aaahhh gasps the audience*

That's because he hadn't reached the infectious stage of the disease, he just had the virus in him.



Just so I'm understanding you correctly, are you saying the doctor who was flown back to the US was not showing symptoms? Because if you are, then you're wrong. The guy only went into isolation in Africa because he came down with symptoms. And then flown back a week later, in "grave" condition. So yeah, he more than had the virus in him, he was already dying from it.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 05:05 PM
link   
a reply to: VashKonnor

So...we can safely assume you are a virologist. You joined just to set us straight on the facts of the progression of ebola?

Des



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 05:09 PM
link   

originally posted by: randyvs
a reply to: 00nunya00




Jesus H, people, quit with the infighting. We're all here to share relevant info. I stayed in the ICU with my brother at Children's of Atlanta/Egleston while he died of a rejected liver transplant, in the ICU, and I saw nurses clean his poo-laden bed, and also forgot to wash my hands on the way out/in of the ICU (as well as other families), despite the huge signs reminding me to do so. I saw dirty floors, and also nurses using anti-bacterial foam every single time they opened his door.


Gawd I am so sorry for your brothers fate. Life seems to be one big broken heart sometimes.
Good on you for being with him. So good on you. And thanks for the little tears, they're nice sometimes.

Good thread Des
SnF


I appreciate that, but it's really his nurses that deserve the accolades. They bent over backwards to allow us to have the least-stressful time with him we could, from getting us special ID badges so we could come and go from the hospital at any time of day, parking vouchers so we never had to pay to park in the garage, going out to buy him special meals from local restaurants he was craving (at no cost to us), even throwing him a 21st birthday party the day before he came home to die (he died the day after his 21st----born on Mother's Day, died on Mother's day). Then they organized a memorial for him (they call it a "Rock-a-bye" celebration, where everyone takes a rock and tells stories and memories of him, then place the rocks in a vase to show how full he made everyone's life by his presence).

Those nurses were the true heroes, and they wept when he died. They genuinely loved him, and they still leave comments on his Facebook page every year on his birthday, and sometimes to just say how much they miss him.

So my point: let's lift up nurses on to the pedestal they deserve. Yes, they are human, and make mistakes, and sometimes get a little lazy with protocols. But if ebola hits the US, I have a lot more faith in the care of my nurses than I do in the care of the doctors. Nurses basically run the hospital, everywhere, and they are the ones who will actually save your life. The docs will only give you face-time for about 5 minutes total a day. And usually, the nurses know everything the docs do after a few years, they just don't have the license to write prescriptions. Nurses are your best friend.

ETA: not implying you were dissing nurses, this is directed to those who are.
edit on 3-8-2014 by 00nunya00 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 05:54 PM
link   
a reply to: VashKonnor


originally posted by: VashKonnor
A virologist would giggle because Dr.Gupta was saying that doctor/patient was infectious.

He wasn't.

*aaahhh gasps the audience*

That's because he hadn't reached the infectious stage of the disease, he just had the virus in him.


Did you just make all that up?

Just from five days ago:

Ebola: US Doctor's Condition 'Deteriorates'




Melissa Strickland, a spokesperson for the Samaritan's Purse charity that Dr Brantly was working for told Sky News: "Overnight, Dr Kent Brantly's condition deteriorated, but we are still classifying him as stable.

"He continues to receive intensive medical care."




posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 05:56 PM
link   
Well the plot is thickening for sure now

abc7.com...



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 06:15 PM
link   

originally posted by: trig_grl
Well the plot is thickening for sure now

abc7.com...


A step in the right direction Trig...but I'd prefer to see all flights from the effected areas halted until a better screening process is put in place. People in the effected areas are starting to panic and wanting to get out now, before all flights are halted.



At Los Angeles International Airport and other U.S. airports, CDC quarantine officers are on alert, looking for infected passengers.

The agency is sending 50 experts to that region to help with the outbreak. There's a concern that the deadly outbreak can spread to other countries. The CDC operates quarantine stations at airports across the U.S., including at Los Angeles International Airport, to respond to reports of illness or death.
abc7.com...


Des

edit on 3-8-2014 by Destinyone because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 06:23 PM
link   

originally posted by: Destinyone
a reply to: VashKonnor

So...we can safely assume you are a virologist. You joined just to set us straight on the facts of the progression of ebola?

Des



Im a bacteriologist can I play?



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 06:30 PM
link   
There are lots red herrings in the media make me edgy.
You have the saying it's not airborne so you don't have to worry. You have the bringing of patients to atlanta out of all places knowing it's the hotbed and residence of the American Ebola where it currently lives in animals of the area the area is sweltering with bugs and humidity and summer a great;; place of incubating and breeding new Ebola. The media is lying right and left. It s become very easy for them to lie knowing they are



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 06:31 PM
link   
a reply to: crazyewok

Your input is always welcome CE. You have a certain reputation on ATS. You always say something to nudge one's mind.


Des



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 06:32 PM
link   

originally posted by: adnanmuf
There are lots red herrings in the media make me edgy.
You have the saying it's not airborne so you don't have to worry. You have the bringing of patients to atlanta out of all places knowing it's the hotbed and residence of the American Ebola where it currently lives in animals of the area the area is sweltering with bugs and humidity and summer a great;; place of incubating and breeding new Ebola. The media is lying right and left. It s become very easy for them to lie knowing they are



Ok is it me or does evey post you make make less sand less sense?



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 06:40 PM
link   
a reply to: 00nunya00

I am so glad I pulled that from you. Indeed.




posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 06:44 PM
link   
a reply to: crazyewok

I'm sure there must be some language barrier there
Wok.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 06:45 PM
link   
All sides. If the person is having symptoms then he wullbetransmitting the pathogen in no time. If you say the infection is infectious meaning transmitting the pathogen. It's a layman word. The incubation period is the time from inoculation of the pathogen in the patient till the time start showing symptoms. The incubation period time is the same time of the transmitting period (aka infectious period) which starts after the patient is healed till the end of the period. It's also the same time for the cycles of flares. So if 50 people got sick on Monday then you count time days and then you you will have the next flare usually many times the number of infected first time ie Monday.the shorter the incubation period the worse it will be.


(post by adnanmuf removed for a serious terms and conditions violation)

posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 07:39 PM
link   
This virus been spreading since the 1970's and now everyone panicking?? Please stop! There wont be no false flags, no martial law, and all this non sense. Stop spreading fear and bs



new topics

top topics



 
128
<< 47  48  49    51  52  53 >>

log in

join