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Ebola Patient in Atlanta Hospital

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posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 11:02 PM
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originally posted by: raymundoko
www.thefreedictionary.com...

airborne transmission - a transmission mechanism in the which the infectious agent is spread as an aerosol and usually enters a person through the respiratory tract

a reply to: 00nunya00



That is not a medical definition of 100% certainty of how this disease is spread. Please provide a 100% certain definition of how THIS disease was spread to THESE workers (especially without using the terms you've already discounted as possible in this case of ebola). Thanks.




posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 11:04 PM
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a reply to: raymundoko

Ok, so someone sneezes droplets at you,

you breathe in one or some of those droplets,

where does it go,

the respiratory tract.



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 11:04 PM
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Thats how most West African ebola centers look...why do you think everyone has legit hazmat suits? My point stands that doctors catch it because they aren't as protected as you think they are. Even if a doctor is protected he is then around people who weren't fully protected. There are plenty if documentaries you can watch about the poor conditions of Ebola centers in West Africa.

a reply to: Krakatoa




posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 11:04 PM
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Repost so it's not missed in the flurry of newer posts since it has revealing and telling images.


originally posted by: raymundoko
Dr. Sheik Humarr Khan, I'm on a phone and it won't let me paste, but it's easy enough to google. He was working 12 hours a day 7 days a week and accidentally exposed himself go an early symptomatic carrier.

a reply to: Krakatoa



Here is his bio: Dr. Sheik Humarr Khan
In it he is listed as a noted expert in the field of Lassa Fever (not Ebola). Lassa is a viral hemorrhagic fever, but, it is not Ebola.
A story of his death from CNN: Ebola doctor in Sierra Leone dies (no mention of how he contracted it here)
A story about his work and a mention of his death: Top doctor dies from Ebola after treating dozens (no mention of how he contracted it here)
A blurb report on him from CBS News: Top Ebola doctor Sheik Humarr Khan dies (no mention of how he contracted it here)
Sierra Leone’s top Ebola doctor, Sheik Umar Khan, dies from virus as major airline suspends flights (no mention of how he contracted it here) However, the photos from the site clearly show the precautions used there are NOT (I repeat not) close to BL-4 protections. They are not wearing fully contained hazmat suits.

This one shows the setup of the main clinic....


This one shows the "High Risk Zone" (with arrows I added indicating the areas of potential infection, including a woman not protected at all)



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 11:06 PM
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Generally speaking (not 100% scientifically proven, lol) - the MSM cannot be trusted in what they report. Think "Wag the Dog". We are spoon food the story line they want us to have daily. It is my belief that TPTB are ALWAYS 100 steps ahead of us and things like this don't happen by accident.

They have several agendas and none of them 'good'.



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 11:06 PM
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Your mouth, and then your stomach...

Droplets are usually too large to be inhaled and get caught in your throat. Airborne pathogens are small enough they go right to the lungs.

a reply to: MrLimpet



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 11:06 PM
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a reply to: raymundoko

When you get a chance,

Can you post the bio's for us.



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 11:07 PM
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originally posted by: raymundoko
Thats how most West African ebola centers look...why do you think everyone has legit hazmat suits? My point stands that doctors catch it because they aren't as protected as you think they are. Even if a doctor is protected he is then around people who weren't fully protected. There are plenty if documentaries you can watch about the poor conditions of Ebola centers in West Africa.

a reply to: Krakatoa



Please provide a 100% certain documentary of how THESE medical workers contracted THIS disease, of THIS subclade, at THIS time. Otherwise, you are speculating based on YouTube videos (which is not an admissible point of evidence in THIS case.) Thanks.



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 11:11 PM
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I would speculate part of it's being passed around from toilets. Sick people with explosive diarrhea or vomiting that's spashed onto surfaces. Or even flushing, causes an aerosol effect.

They don't appear to be wearing properly secured hazmat suits. The gloves are loose fitting. Hair hanging out, then they lean over a patient with their hair.

I've seen photos of bloodied bodies with open wounds laying on stretchers . Staff hanging around with no protection, whatsoever. Just google ebola in image search.

Whoever this blond nurse is. She's often seen with no mask or gloves
Image

WARNING graphic images

No protection in this Image and this Image



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 11:11 PM
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He didn't post the medical definition of airborne transmission. I did.

a reply to: MrLimpet

Also, you've now seen these workers aren't wearing hazmat suits like was claimed...



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 11:13 PM
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a reply to: 00nunya00

That is impossible to do. There is no way to determine that Ebola is not airborne now. All that is being said is that from past research previous strains are not airborne in humans.

This particular strain that is being spread has a 3% genetic variation from that last outbreak. There is not enough research yet to say one way or the other. Even if they did say "here's confirmation it's not", they cannot predict future mutations of this virus. It can mutate at any moment. When it does, it won't tell us. We'll only know when we see hundreds getting infected in matters of days with no contact parameters.

Currently, it is NOT airborne. That is all we know.



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 11:14 PM
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I don't have to anymore. Kraka found the doctor I named along with images of his work area...if that doesn't make it obvious to you how doctors in West Africa contract it nothing will.

Edit: and violet posted more. These aren't awesome sterile areas. They are tents where people use rags to cover their face when the masks are gone.

a reply to: MrLimpet


edit on 6-8-2014 by raymundoko because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 11:15 PM
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originally posted by: raymundoko
He didn't post the medical definition of airborne transmission. I did.

a reply to: MrLimpet

Also, you've now seen these workers aren't wearing hazmat suits like was claimed...


Please provide your evidence that THESE medical workers we are discussing (Brantley et al) were not wearing proper medical precautions in THIS case, at THIS time, and how they DID (with 100% certainty) contract ebola. Thanks.



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 11:15 PM
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originally posted by: raymundoko
Your mouth, and then your stomach...

Droplets are usually too large to be inhaled and get caught in your throat. Airborne pathogens are small enough they go right to the lungs.

a reply to: MrLimpet



So the large droplets flying through the air are more likely to go down your throat rather than go up your nose?

Just because they are large, are they not considered airborne? There are many large objects that fly through the air that are considered airborne.



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 11:16 PM
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a reply to: Krakatoa
I just tried posting the same. Couldn't get images to post. Or do I upload?
The conditions in these medical facilities are a disgrace. They simply do not have the proper supplies.

ETA

I'm still speculating it's possible to be airborne though.

edit on 6-8-2014 by violet because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 11:18 PM
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They are not considered airborne transmission. They are droplet transmission. Again, if someone spits blood into your mouth and they have aids does that make aids airborne? Via standard definition, sure, it travels through the air, but medically it is not an airborne pathogen .

Also, even if the droplet got in your nose it would probably not enter the lungs. It would probably find it's way right to the bloodstream via the nostril.

a reply to: MrLimpet


edit on 6-8-2014 by raymundoko because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 11:19 PM
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originally posted by: raymundoko
They are not considered airborne transmission. They are droplet transmission. Again, if someone spits blood into your mouth and they have aids does that make aids airborne? Via standard definition, sure, it travels through the air, but medically it is not an airborne pathogen .

a reply to: MrLimpet



Please provide your evidence that Brantley et al had blood projected into their mouths. Otherwise, it's baseless speculation on your part. Thanks.
edit on 6-8-2014 by 00nunya00 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 11:21 PM
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When did I say Brantly had blood shot in his mouth??

Here's a great shot of him in his "hazmat" suit.

gistonthis.com...

a reply to: 00nunya00


edit on 6-8-2014 by raymundoko because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 11:22 PM
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a reply to: MrLimpet

What we have concluded is that we don't breath in Ebola, we get it through contact. That sneeze particulate is on a surface, you touch that surface during the 21 day survivabilty without a host, and then you wipe the sweat from your brow, rub your eyes because you are tired, or cough into your hand. Carelessness, and not following strict BSL-4 protocols, which is impossible, almost, at the outbreak points.

And Ebola is loving every minute of it.



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 11:22 PM
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originally posted by: 00nunya00
a reply to: 00nunya00

From your source (don't know why you cut off the length definition, but here it is



Historically, the area of defined risk has been a distance of less than)3 feet around the patient and is based on epidemiologic and simulated studies of selected infections


Three feet (or less). Three feet. How many of you NYCers, or Chicagoans, LAians or any other public-transit-users have been closer than three feet to your traveling companions? Hell, that defines your private car pool. :/


Even further down they continue with:

Thus, a distance of (less than) 3 feet around the patient is best viewed as an example of what is meant by "a short distance from a patient" and should not be used as the sole criterion for deciding when a mask should be donned to protect from droplet exposure. Based on these considerations, it may be prudent to don a mask when within 6 to 10 feet of the patient or upon entry into the patient's room, especially when exposure to emerging or highly virulent pathogens is likely. More studies are needed to improve understanding of droplet transmission under various circumstances.

edit on 8/7/1414 by NoAngel2u because: had to remove the greater than/less than symbol




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