can anyone suggest a good water purifier please?

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posted on Jul, 31 2014 @ 08:59 PM
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a reply to: BoovDawg

The best distillation process on the planet is oceans to clouds to rain… thats the natural example for us to follow. Nowadays with even radionuclides and atoms of Lead, Mercury (heavy metals) in the environment from accidents and mining, etc. it is good idea to remove even trace elements from our water. It only takes one plutonium atom to kill you (potentially). I know, that is excessive, but the more of these atoms in our blood and bones the more the chances to contract diseases like cancer and birth defects increase.

The system that removes the most solids and organic / biologics from your water is the best and that "system" is simple evaporation to distilling. There are machines that they sell but are expensive. Look up how to make moon shine and see what those back country stills look like. With a copper pot and condensation coil heated by a fire from below you can purify the most ugly water on the planet. Raw sewage will be rendered into pure water by distilling it. It is the meaning, the true meaning of "pure".

Others have brought expedient filtering devices for emergency and Bugout or SHTF scenarios which are fine if living like a refugee. But for the ordinary everyday intake in a current modern civilization, one needs to pay more and more attention to the stuff in our water.




posted on Jul, 31 2014 @ 09:03 PM
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a reply to: g146541


I did not know about this literature but will look into it, but am unwilling to chance it.



Thaks for the reply sorry for the delay. Chance what? The cleanest water possible? Pay particular attention to the disinformation about distilled water in that link I provided. That dis info is brought to you by the people that want you to buy their brand of bottled water.

Heres a forinstyanceforyu…
most people are aware they should use distilled water in their car batteries and steam irons because… they will last longer. Same with your bodies plumbing…



posted on Jul, 31 2014 @ 10:20 PM
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a reply to: intrptr




The system that removes the most solids and organic / biologics from your water is the best and that "system" is simple evaporation to distilling.


True statement so, yes ... but ..... be careful.

Distilling will remove everything (actually, it leaves it behind rather than removing) that has a boiling point greater than water, that is 100C or 212F

Some chemicals found in water can boil before water does and as such will end up in the distilled water.

Alcohol is one example, there are others.

Just something to be aware of. Some chemicals can make it through the process.

P
edit on 31/7/2014 by pheonix358 because: (no reason given)
edit on 31/7/2014 by pheonix358 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 31 2014 @ 10:25 PM
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this filter is great...

www.vitality4life.com.au...

it removes the nasties and retains the good stuff
edit on 31-7-2014 by hopenotfeariswhatweneed because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 31 2014 @ 11:31 PM
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a reply to: pheonix358


Alcohol is one example, there are others.

Just something to be aware of. Some chemicals can make it through the process.

Thanks for the clarification. I agree. I think I said that almost all (99.97%) are removed. I would appreciate any links you might have that list chemicals that distill along with water. I know a physicist that once told me the problem with atoms is that they are smaller than a molecule of H20 and can fit inside the molecule and thus be transferred in the distillation process.

We were talking about radioactive elements at the time. I have tried to search the internet for data on this and so far have come up empty. My search skills aren't the best in that regard.

Aware of the vacuum of information along these lines currently as well. The government doesn't make it obvious about the dangers we are facing from heavy metals and toxins in our water.

Distillation is the cleanest process for "leaving behind" unwanted stuff in our water.
edit on 31-7-2014 by intrptr because: bb code, spelling



posted on Jul, 31 2014 @ 11:45 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

This should scare the pants off your butt


Distillation - Pros and Cons

From that source




The distillation process contains several elements that make it undesirable for purifying drinking water. First of all, while the vaporization process will strip water of salt, metals, and bacteria, the boiling point of most synthetic chemicals, including pesticides, herbicides, and chlorine solutions is lower than the boiling point of water. Synthetic chemicals are the major contaminants remaining after municipal treatment. Distillation does not remove these harmful chemicals.


So yeah, I suggest two or more processes if you want pure water. Getting the chemicals out is a major pain but it is possible if you can do multiple runs at set temperatures but that is very difficult.

That source has lots of other info on the various methods of purifying water. It is a must read.

Sometimes, catching rain water is the best way, just don't catch the initial rain.

Hope that helps.

P



posted on Jul, 31 2014 @ 11:48 PM
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Ive heard that u can pasteurize water with a plastic sheet and the sun

Dont mark my words on that

Ill look for a link



Eta

al-will-survive.com...


modernsurvivalblog.com...


modernsurvivalblog.com...
edit on pm720143111America/ChicagoThu, 31 Jul 2014 23:52:35 -0500_7000000 by Another_Nut because: (no reason given)
edit on pm720143111America/ChicagoThu, 31 Jul 2014 23:56:51 -0500_7000000 by Another_Nut because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 1 2014 @ 12:02 AM
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a reply to: pheonix358

Ummm, okay. I did say that some of what water filter companies provide is disinfo, right? At the bottom of the link you provided:


Finally, distillation, like reverse osmosis, strips water of natural trace elements. When these elements are removed from water, the hydrogen composition becomes greater in proportion, making the water very acidic. Several studies have proven that drinking distilled water, stripped of minerals, can actually be harmful to the body system (Rona, 1995). Long-term consumption of such de-mineralized water can result in mineral deficiencies in the body. Though the removal of trace minerals creates water that is ideal for use in photo or print shops, it creates tasteless and even unhealthy drinking water.

Emphasis added.

Read myth #2 in the link I provided.

distilled water myths



posted on Aug, 1 2014 @ 12:17 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

Yes it is hard to move through the currents of dis-info and yet ...




Long-term consumption of such de-mineralized water can result in mineral deficiencies in the body.


Can be true. We need trace amounts of many elements and historically we have swallowed these with our water. On the other hand, we also get them from some foods. A good multivitamin capsule can put back what our food and water do not.

Our habit of using modern intensive farming also leaches a great deal of required trace elements from the soil and thus from our food and animals. These are never returned to the soil as nature intended and so we need to find them in other ways.

We need some minerals in our water, just not the heavy metals, carcinogens and toxic herbicides such as round up.

Try to take a mid point through what you are reading. Much of it is half truths.

Hell, a good breakfast cereal puts back a lot of stuff and is a very good source.

When in doubt, think back to a time prior to the industrial revolution and realize that our water should not be pure.

P



posted on Aug, 1 2014 @ 07:09 AM
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a reply to: pheonix358

I'm sorry but I don't think you are reading the link I provided. The bit about how much city tap water must be consumed to get the recommended daily allowance of trace elements is plain as day.

Water does not removed minerals already fixed in our cells only the waste in the blood stream. This means water does not "leach" minerals from our bodies. Like I said reread the link.

ETA: Or just keep disagreeing with me about anything I say like you been doing for some time.

Whaever, done here.
edit on 1-8-2014 by intrptr because: additional



posted on Aug, 1 2014 @ 07:24 AM
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a reply to: intrptr




ETA: Or just keep disagreeing with me about anything I say like you been doing for some time.


I have not been disagreeing with you. Perhaps you need to rethink that statement. I would not read too much into the word 'leech,' it is simply a matter of if you don't continually replace the good trace elements then you will not have any and via the bloodstream and hence water, they will leave your body.

As I have said, much information on this subject is half truths. Try the middle ground. Nothing you have said is wrong but perhaps you see a conspiracy where it is just a poor choice of words used to express a concept.

We need trace elements to stay healthy, it's just that we need the good ones and not the bad ones.

P



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 12:47 PM
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originally posted by: pheonix358
a reply to: intrptr
So yeah, I suggest two or more processes if you want pure water. Getting the chemicals out is a major pain but it is possible if you can do multiple runs at set temperatures but that is very difficult.
P


First you discard the very initial portion of your distilled water, as it's most likely to have the contaminates from things with a lower boiling point than water. If you still think distillation didn't get everything, keep the water fairly warm 80°F - 120°F, and aerate it for a bit over an hour. Aeration means you have a container with open air flow, and either pump air through the water or pump the water through a showerhead or misting nozzle which sprays water back into the container. This will get rid of a majority of VOCs (like alcohols or hydrocarbons) with lower boiling points than water. They evaporate out into the open air.

And then if you want, distill that water again. But usually that level is really only necessary for industrial processes.

In most cases single distillation is usually fine if you don't pull your water to be distilled from an oil slick or an area known to be heavily contaminated with petroleum products. Ditto in avoiding water that smells like lawn fertilizer or plasticy acrid smelling stuff, as those are the other things likely to contain volatiles which may not be readily separated by distillation.

Other than that, distillation is likely one of the easiest ways to get clean water with the least resources or specialized materials. The main downsides is that it does tend to use a lot of energy and it's lossy (a good portion of the water is going into the air) without good quality equipment.

For a survival situation, a kettle still is probably one of the easiest and cheapest methods. A good length of copper tubing and something to fit it onto the end of a tea-kettle pot. Other than the kettle, the plumbing section of a hardware store should have all you need for under $20.





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