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Does Fukushima Have Anything to Do With My Extra Warm Tap Water?

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posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 01:21 PM
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OP is being silly, I think this thread is a bait thread.




posted on Sep, 5 2014 @ 04:24 PM
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originally posted by: amraks
OP is being silly, I think this thread is a bait thread.



Excuuuuuse me, but did you not read my post on the prior page? It was just before yours, as a matter of fact.

For your convenience, I will repeat it here:



Actually, saying that there is an entire planet between me and Fukushima is irrelevant when you take the jetstream into account.

This very recent article states that the Jetstream has carried radionuclides from Fukushima and dumped them on the West Coast of the U.S. where they made their way into the groundwater. This dumping can apply to the entire United States and beyond: Fukushima nuclear material reported in West Coast groundwater.

There you have it, folks.


The respondent to whom I had replied indicated that it would take a great amount of radiation to turn my tap water warm.

Well, just how much radiation is causing the bark to peel off the trees of Halifax leaving the underlying tissue red? Hmmmm, I would say A LOT!!

See this recent Youtube submission: Most Horrific Sight Of Sick Dying Trees In Halifax Since Fukushima.

P.M.
edit on 5-9-2014 by theworldisnotenough because: Corrected a misspelling.



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 02:52 PM
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I finally got around to purchasing a suitable thermometer to test the temperature of my tap water.

At midday today, the water that initially flowed from the hot water tap came in at the same temperature as the room temperature, 75 degrees, which was to be expected.

The temperature of the cold tap water after I allowed it to run liberally was a full 5 degrees HIGHER!

80 degrees for cold tap water is way too warm.

The cold tap water was like this, and even warmer, at the last two places where I resided during the dead of winter.

I want to test the water temperature early tomorrow morning. Stay tuned for the results.

P.M.



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 03:18 PM
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originally posted by: theworldisnotenough
I finally got around to purchasing a suitable thermometer to test the temperature of my tap water.

At midday today, the water that initially flowed from the hot water tap came in at the same temperature as the room temperature, 75 degrees, which was to be expected.

The temperature of the cold tap water after I allowed it to run liberally was a full 5 degrees HIGHER!

80 degrees for cold tap water is way too warm.

The cold tap water was like this, and even warmer, at the last two places where I resided during the dead of winter.

I want to test the water temperature early tomorrow morning. Stay tuned for the results.

P.M.

Be sure to post pictures (a.k.a. EVIDENCE) to back up your shenanigans.




posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 05:00 PM
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originally posted by: ChaosComplex

originally posted by: theworldisnotenough
I finally got around to purchasing a suitable thermometer to test the temperature of my tap water.

At midday today, the water that initially flowed from the hot water tap came in at the same temperature as the room temperature, 75 degrees, which was to be expected.

The temperature of the cold tap water after I allowed it to run liberally was a full 5 degrees HIGHER!

80 degrees for cold tap water is way too warm.

The cold tap water was like this, and even warmer, at the last two places where I resided during the dead of winter.

I want to test the water temperature early tomorrow morning. Stay tuned for the results.

P.M.

Be sure to post pictures (a.k.a. EVIDENCE) to back up your shenanigans.



You're joking, right?

What do you hope to see in a photo? The clarity of my tap water?

Or do you want me to get some kind of infrared, heat sensing device to take images of heat?

Déjà vu! This reminds me of the guy who expected me to do surveying utilizing photos of the Fukushima Daiichi power plant buildings to see if those buildings shifted a fraction of an inch, this directive to be accomplished without super-accurate before and after photos.

Do you want me to travel many miles to my former places of residence where I'd have to break-and-enter in order to take photos of what??? TAP WATER?!?!?!

Anyway, I refer you to my earlier reply in which I cited the Enenews article, Fukushima nuclear material reported in West Coast groundwater.

This article notes that radionuclides from Fukushima made their way into the groundwater of California.

I'll have you know that radionuclides from Fukushima took the eastbound Jetstream route, crossed over the Unites States, and landed in Western and Eastern Europe. With all of this being the case, does it not stand to reason that such radionuclides landed all over the United States and made their way into the groundwater in many, many places here?

P.M.



posted on Sep, 10 2014 @ 06:45 PM
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a reply to: theworldisnotenough
No, not joking.

Pictures (even a short video clip) showing your process are always encouraged. Example: fill a bucket from the hose (cold water outlet), dunk the thermometer, and take pictures to document your findings. Link me to any number of studies/claims/experiments done by other people and I will stand my ground with the "riiiiight...whatever you say" mindset.

A simple video would be ideal, and even with a low quality cellphone camera you could accomplish a pretty decent demonstration showing what you say is true.

Just trying to give you suggestions that may help you get some of us critical thinkers on board with your claims. Words mean absolutely zilch on the internet, and less than that on a conspiracy forum.

Sorry, just being realistic.



posted on Sep, 11 2014 @ 03:46 AM
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I performed the same type of water temperature measurements this morning as I did yesterday at midday.

The temperature differential was even greater this morning: 7 degrees.

The incoming cold tap water temperature was 82 degrees which is much warmer than what would make for a refreshing glass of drinking water.

In the past, I never had the need to refrigerate my drinking water.

To the person who wants some proof of my temperature readings: what's far more important is that everyone in the reading audience measure the temperature of his own tap water and not get so distracted with the output of their refrigerator's new fangled cold water dispenser. Just being realistic.

P.M.



posted on Sep, 11 2014 @ 10:48 AM
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A number of years ago, I heard it mentioned on T.V. that the ground just five feet below the surface has a fairly constant temperature of 50 degrees virtually worldwide.

More recently, I viewed an on-demand episode of "Modern Marvels" on the subject of dirt which, towards the end, included an interview with a builder of new-age, outer-space style homes made mostly of dirt and old tires. He said that worldwide, the temperature of the ground eight feet below the surface is a constant 72 degrees.

Based on what I previously heard and based on my childhood experiences of playing in the dirt and drinking well water, I could not swallow such a high temperature of 72 degrees at such a deep depth.

I did some Bing searches, and while there were variances in the information, most supported the first estimate, which I noted above, of 50 degrees about five feet below the surface.

This website, www.alliantenergy.com... , states: "Below the frost line - usually about six feet deep – the earth is a constant temperature of about 50 degrees Fahrenheit all year long."

My tap water is way too warm.

On this webpage, answers.google.com... , nassim99-ga of San Diego wants to know, "why it was that I cannot get cool water from my faucets at home?" This question was posted in 2006 which was well before the Fukushima Daiichi disaster but after the Chernobyl disaster, so...

Does Chernobyl Have Anything To Do With My Extra Warm Tap Water?

P.M.



posted on Sep, 11 2014 @ 11:37 AM
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originally posted by: theworldisnotenough

originally posted by: amraks
OP is being silly, I think this thread is a bait thread.



Excuuuuuse me, but did you not read my post on the prior page? It was just before yours, as a matter of fact.

For your convenience, I will repeat it here:



Actually, saying that there is an entire planet between me and Fukushima is irrelevant when you take the jetstream into account.

This very recent article states that the Jetstream has carried radionuclides from Fukushima and dumped them on the West Coast of the U.S. where they made their way into the groundwater. This dumping can apply to the entire United States and beyond: Fukushima nuclear material reported in West Coast groundwater.

There you have it, folks.


The respondent to whom I had replied indicated that it would take a great amount of radiation to turn my tap water warm.

Well, just how much radiation is causing the bark to peel off the trees of Halifax leaving the underlying tissue red? Hmmmm, I would say A LOT!!

See this recent Youtube submission: Most Horrific Sight Of Sick Dying Trees In Halifax Since Fukushima.

P.M.


Yeah I read it, Your theory makes as much sense as blind kids that like movies.



posted on Sep, 11 2014 @ 12:04 PM
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originally posted by: theworldisnotenough
I performed the same type of water temperature measurements this morning as I did yesterday at midday.

The temperature differential was even greater this morning: 7 degrees.

The incoming cold tap water temperature was 82 degrees which is much warmer than what would make for a refreshing glass of drinking water.

In the past, I never had the need to refrigerate my drinking water.

To the person who wants some proof of my temperature readings: what's far more important is that everyone in the reading audience measure the temperature of his own tap water and not get so distracted with the output of their refrigerator's new fangled cold water dispenser. Just being realistic.

P.M.

If you don't want to provide simple, observable proof then that is surely your prerogative. It also goes to support the theory that you are out of your mind.

I am on a well, my refrigerator was probably the cheapest one offered about 15 years ago (no water dispenser) and my cold tap water is just as cool as it's always been. This house (trailer, actually) is over 30 years old and the only thing that's been changed out has been the fridge, clothes washer and clothes dryer. Still the same pipes, still the same well, even still the same pump on the well (just rebuilt). My pipes are only about a foot and a half - two feet deep from the well to the house, and the well is about 30 feet from the house. It's been in the upper 90's the last few days (99 yesterday) and there has been no increase in temperature of my cold tap water.

Get your plumbing looked at. Better yet, get a sample of your water tested for whatever you think is happening to it so that you will stop the nonsense. But I'm sure that since a few pictures or a video were too much to ask then getting a sample of your drinking water tested is an unrealistic step to take to see if you're Ingesting/bathing in radioactive material. Right.

edit on 9/11/2014 by ChaosComplex because: (no reason given)

edit on 9/11/2014 by ChaosComplex because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 11 2014 @ 01:03 PM
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I love this place.



posted on Sep, 11 2014 @ 06:15 PM
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originally posted by: ChaosComplex

My pipes are only about a foot and a half - two feet deep from the well to the house, and the well is about 30 feet from the house. It's been in the upper 90's the last few days (99 yesterday) and there has been no increase in temperature of my cold tap water.



It would be nice if you would substantiate your claims with a video or, at least, a few pictures.

Just trying to be helpful. Just trying to be realistic.

P.M.
edit on 11-9-2014 by theworldisnotenough because: Correction.



posted on Sep, 11 2014 @ 07:31 PM
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a reply to: theworldisnotenough

Great technique. Reminds me of the classic "I know you are but what am I?"

I'm not wasting the precious 3 minutes it would take to post a picture of my front yard when all you've presented is unsubstantiated claims.

Later, gator.



posted on Sep, 12 2014 @ 06:43 AM
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originally posted by: ChaosComplex

originally posted by: theworldisnotenough
I performed the same type of water temperature measurements this morning as I did yesterday at midday.

The temperature differential was even greater this morning: 7 degrees.

The incoming cold tap water temperature was 82 degrees which is much warmer than what would make for a refreshing glass of drinking water.

In the past, I never had the need to refrigerate my drinking water.

To the person who wants some proof of my temperature readings: what's far more important is that everyone in the reading audience measure the temperature of his own tap water and not get so distracted with the output of their refrigerator's new fangled cold water dispenser. Just being realistic.

P.M.

If you don't want to provide simple, observable proof then that is surely your prerogative. It also goes to support the theory that you are out of your mind.


Hmmmm, let's recap.

Mr. ChaosComplex, you insult the state of my mental health big time in a totally irrelevant way.

You knock me for providing "unsubstantiated" claims of temperature readings when a report in text format is more than enough. After all, why should I, after having been inconvenienced with photography or videography to appease the likes of you, allow my pictures or videos to be open to the same spurious accusations of falsification?

You more than imply that I am stupid, ditto for this whole thread.

Yet, Mr. ChaosComplex, you seem to be exhibiting a degree of obsession with me and my thread.

So, Mr. ChaosComplex, what is really bothering you?

P.M.



posted on Sep, 12 2014 @ 12:21 PM
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a reply to: theworldisnotenough

The thread goes to the top of my subscribed threads everyone someone responds. I return, hoping to see something besides links to YouTube clips and "reports in text format". But unsurprisingly, you haven't done much to sway the nonbelievers.




posted on Sep, 17 2014 @ 02:58 PM
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Well, well, well.

Here's a very interesting, recent article from Enenews.com: Gov’t Scientists: “Something very unusual occurring” off west coast of US, Canada.

The article says, "Right now it’s [the ocean water's] super warm all the way across the Pacific to Japan."

The article uses the terminology "super warm," and the implication from its context, meaning a report on Enenews, is that radionuclides are the source of the problem.

Think about it: the Pacific Ocean is very vast from north to south and from east to west, not to mention that it is, I understand, as deep as seven miles. In contrast, a nuclear power plant building at Fukushima Daiichi is far less than a pin point on a map in comparison, yet the coriums and spent fuel that have released a portion of their radioactivity into the water of the Pacific are being implicitly blamed for the temperature of the unprecedented SUPER HEATED water of the ocean.

Think about it. If that is, in fact, the case, then why is it a stretch that radionuclides from Fukushima and Chernobyl that have become bound to rain and that have found their way into the U.S. groundwater are making the groundwater, not SUPER WARM, but moderately warm?

And, by the way, there's a hurricane a'comin'.

P.M.
edit on 17-9-2014 by theworldisnotenough because: Corrected grammar.

edit on 17-9-2014 by theworldisnotenough because: Added clarification.



posted on Sep, 17 2014 @ 03:23 PM
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a reply to: theworldisnotenough

And there isn't even a remote shred of evidence that Fukushima is responsible for what's happening. They don't even START to say that it is. In fact the anomaly started in the south and moved north, as shown by the wind anomalies chart, if you read the PDF file. The normal flow of nutrients from the subarctic was disrupted, by the disruption of the western winds that normally carry nutrients with them from the subarctic.

So how did Fukushima manage to cause wind anomalies from the south, well below where it is?



posted on Sep, 17 2014 @ 04:45 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: theworldisnotenough

And there isn't even a remote shred of evidence that Fukushima is responsible for what's happening. They don't even START to say that it is. In fact the anomaly started in the south and moved north, as shown by the wind anomalies chart, if you read the PDF file. The normal flow of nutrients from the subarctic was disrupted, by the disruption of the western winds that normally carry nutrients with them from the subarctic.

So how did Fukushima manage to cause wind anomalies from the south, well below where it is?


I am not a scientist, but I do know that there can be much differences of opinion among scientists on various issues, like what is a cause and what is an effect.

Are you sure that the ocean is not affecting the wind as opposed to the other way around?

P.M.



posted on Sep, 17 2014 @ 04:53 PM
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a reply to: theworldisnotenough

The wind affects the ocean. The winds from the subarctic bring nutrients from up there down into the pacific, and cool the waters. No wind, no nutrients, no cooling, warmer pacific. The winds come from the south, up around the top of the pacific, and down the west coast of the US and Canada.



posted on Sep, 17 2014 @ 05:06 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: theworldisnotenough

The wind affects the ocean. The winds from the subarctic bring nutrients from up there down into the pacific, and cool the waters. No wind, no nutrients, no cooling, warmer pacific. The winds come from the south, up around the top of the pacific, and down the west coast of the US and Canada.


Really?

Well, I heard that the melting glaciers of Greenland upset the salinity of the Atlantic Ocean up there, and, so, that melting also disrupts the big Atlantic current which NORMALLY brings warm water to the Northeastern United States, Southeastern Canada, across the ocean to Britain and Northern Europe to NORMALLY prevent an Ice Age for those parts.

Hence, in this case of the Atlantic Ocean, you have the ocean affecting the atmospheric weather, not the other way around.

It's a known fact that the warming effect of the Greenhouse Effect can actually have a colder effect in some areas, not a warming effect there. Yet some scientists will point to this cooling effect to make hokum out of global warming.

QED

P.M.



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