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Does Fukushima Have Anything to Do With My Extra Warm Tap Water?

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posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 11:01 AM
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I've come to notice that, for quite some time now, my tap water (from the cold tap, the cold tap) even in the winter is a lot warmer than it used to be. This is true from where and to where I have moved a few months ago, a good number of miles apart.

Years ago, I learned that the ground just five or so feet below the surface is at pretty much the same cool temperature no matter the location on planet Earth.

So, if water supply pipes are a good number of feet below the surface of the ground where it is cool, then why is it that my tap water is noticeably warmer now than a while ago?

I cannot provide sources for what I am now about to mention because I have watched too many Youtube videos and read too many articles to remember from where I got the information.

In a Youtube video, a resident near an abandoned uranium mine out west stated that his relatives are living proof.... CORRECTION: "dying proof" that there is a problem there. He went on to say that his tap water is HOT due to radiation. My tap water is just extra warm.

There were Youtube videos on the disasters at Fukushima and Three Mile Island that pointed out that water samples from those places vibrated and were discolored and hot. My tap water is just extra warm.

Somewhere along the line, I read that a meltdown at a nuclear power plant that touches the groundwater creates a worldwide problem. Now, is this because there will be explosions of steam from the ground shooting radionuclides into the air, or is this because all of the groundwater around the planet is connected with the potential of spreading contamination to all groundwater supplies everywhere, or both?

So, is my tap water warm due to radionuclides and radiation from Fukushima, or is it warm because I have lived in areas reputed to be contaminated with radon which is found in the groundwater?

Maybe my tap water is extra warm because most, if not all, nuclear power plants in America are reputed to be leaking radioactivity into the environment.

Who knows? Do you?

P.M.




posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 11:10 AM
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First of all....Its not your usual complaint......
The Fukishima disaster has released the cores of possibly three units to burn their way downward into the ground....(at least that's where they would end up in theory.....).
They are very hot and very radioactive.....BUT.....nobody actually KNOWS whats happening down there.....
They can only pump cooling water over the resultant mess.....
If you are close to this location I assume it is possible to notice such effect...But its kind of doubtful......
There may be other causes such as Geothermal activity below ground in your area.....??
Also, perhaps reservoir levels may be lower than the norm....?



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 11:12 AM
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In the southwest (Austin area) I turn my gas water heater down in the summer time until it is just the pilot light. Water lines in the south are usually plastic these days and are not very deep and a few days of temps around 100 degrees will produce water that is above your body temp of 98 degrees.

In Yankee land, central Illinois for example, the standard is a minimum of three foot deep. So yes, the deeper the lines, the more even the water temp over the year and the more cool unless you have a budding volcano living under you .



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 11:39 AM
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originally posted by: stirling

There may be other causes such as Geothermal activity below ground in your area.....??
Also, perhaps reservoir levels may be lower than the norm....?




originally posted by: Aliensun

So yes, the deeper the lines, the more even the water temp over the year and the more cool unless you have a budding volcano living under you .



First off, I want to make it clear that I was referring to three residences in two different regions of the country, this country, America.

I will concede what Alex Jones put forth as a conjecture. He believes that increased levels of radon around the country are connected to heightened volcanic activity at the mega volcano known as Yellowstone National Park. So, warmer ground due to geothermal activity that is connected to Yellowstone and radon may be what is responsible for warmer tap water.

Also, the really big holes found in Siberia may be yet another side effect of all this.

I would still like to know if all groundwater around the world is connected into one big supply.

P.M.
edit on 30-7-2014 by theworldisnotenough because: Improved sentence structure.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 11:58 AM
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Not likely......but there are internet tales of nuclear subs passing through caverns beneath the USA.....???
There could be some connections but over all I doubt it....Interesting thought however.....we should proceed to extrapolate it....
Even if there is no total connection, I do know that there is a huge reservoir of water beneath several states....over which is a nuclear decontamination and waste disposal site of some magnitude.....I recall a scandal in Texas I believe where the owner of the site got on the government board to approve his own nuke waste site?????and its situated over the largest aquifer in amerika....
Yellowstone could be heating up ground water alright....I heard of fish dying in the creeks last year from warm water....geothermal? maybe.....
Rezlooper is keeping a regular eye on some of these things and I suggest checking his threads out...specially hooked on methane and sinkholes.....peace



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 12:11 PM
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A lot of localities in high density areas have transitioned from aquifers to surface water collection systems. Surface water would have a much higher initial temperature than an aquifer in most cases.
I don't know if that is the correct explanation for what you are experiencing but unless you live in Fukashima I highly doubt that the meltdown there has anything to do with the temperature of your tap water. And if you do live there, don't drink it!



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 12:42 PM
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originally posted by: PleiaDsClusterDck
A lot of localities in high density areas have transitioned from aquifers to surface water collection systems. Surface water would have a much higher initial temperature than an aquifer in most cases.



As I understand things, where I used to live, the local suburban towns drew their water primarily from aquifers with some supplementation from a huge reservoir in the area that serves as the water supply for a municipality a good number of miles away.

Where I now live, the water comes from an aquifer with some coming from surface water, meaning rivers.

We hear about groundwater flowing into the ocean, but does ocean water ever flow into groundwater? I know, someone will scream "OCEAN WATER IS SALINATED." Well, is there some natural filtering method like reverse osmosis that will filter out salt while allowing certain radionuclides like tritium to pass through?

With tremendous amounts of pressure exerted on the ocean water at the floor of the ocean, you would think that that lower water would be forced somewhere, at least to some extent.

It's been said that we know more about outer space than we do about our oceans.

P.M.
edit on 30-7-2014 by theworldisnotenough because: Extra thought



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 01:25 PM
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a reply to: theworldisnotenough

Where are you located?

Could there be a new water plant near you that uses new procedures to clean water?

Where do you get your water from? Ie. Lake, river, well... Check what the temp of the source of your drinking water is. That way you can find out if its natural or just something to do with the water plant.

If your worried I would start from there.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 01:29 PM
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Could there be a new water plant near you that uses new procedures to clean water?


That is another thing that changed a while back. Chloramine replaced Chlorine in the treatment process. I don't know what effect that would have, though.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 01:43 PM
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a reply to: theworldisnotenough

i didnt see your last post there.

I guess the ocean water could leak into the aquifer, there would be a natural filtration process yes. But from what I remember from school is that the ocean will only go inland if the gradient of the land was sloping down away from the ocean alowing it to flow.

Rivers can knock out river banks by just permiating through the bank making it weake and weaker until it gives. Remember water wants to take the easiest route with the least amount of friction.

Like I said before you should check you water temp at the source, then contact your local water plant and see if its happening there.

Cheers.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 01:50 PM
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Just NO on so many levels.

Sheesh.

Hundred of QUINTILLIONS of gallons of water in this world, and people are thinking the addition of a minute amount of radiation, in comparison to the natural radiation already in existence in the oceans, air, and land, will magically make their water noticeably heat up.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 01:54 PM
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originally posted by: snypwsd
a reply to: theworldisnotenough


Where do you get your water from? Ie. Lake, river, well... Check what the temp of the source of your drinking water is. That way you can find out if its natural or just something to do with the water plant.

If your worried I would start from there.


As noted in my prior reply, right now, my water comes from an aquifer with some coming from one or more rivers.

What I'd really like to do is to check the water with a Geiger counter. However, I've come to learn that there are up to 1,600 isotopes that may be of potential concern, and, for this reason, I'd need 1,600 Geiger counters, each calibrated for each of those isotopes.

A real worry is that, if I did find out conclusively that the tap water is tainted and if I raised issued about it with the landlord, I'd be evicted only to relocate down the street where there is the same water supply.

Back to what I stated in the original post: it's been said that a nuclear meltdown coming into contact groundwater will create a worldwide problem. With this being the case, it was absolutely insane to allow some 400 nuclear power plants to go into operation around the world, for, in time and in all probability, just such a disaster could have been expected.

In the past, I never had the need to refrigerate my drinking water; I'd just drink it right from the tap even during hot summers. Now, I filter my drinking water and refrigerate it.

P.M.
edit on 30-7-2014 by theworldisnotenough because: Afterthought added.
edit on 30-7-2014 by theworldisnotenough because: Corrected grammar.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 01:54 PM
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a reply to: theworldisnotenough

Do you?

why yes ,, yes i do,, heating, vent. AirCon, biz for 25 years.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 01:58 PM
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a reply to: snypwsd

What are your winters like?

Could they have heated pipes some where along the lines?

Do you have copper water lines or abs (pvc) water lines in your house?



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 02:02 PM
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a reply to: BobAthome

Im a gas fitter/sheet metal apprentice. I dont believe its radiation. I believe it has sometging to do with your local area and plant or that the places you have/are living in may not of had the pluming installed right.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 02:18 PM
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originally posted by: theworldisnotenough

originally posted by: stirling

There may be other causes such as Geothermal activity below ground in your area.....??
Also, perhaps reservoir levels may be lower than the norm....?




originally posted by: Aliensun

So yes, the deeper the lines, the more even the water temp over the year and the more cool unless you have a budding volcano living under you .



First off, I want to make it clear that I was referring to three residences in two different regions of the country, this country, America.

I will concede what Alex Jones put forth as a conjecture. He believes that increased levels of radon around the country are connected to heightened volcanic activity at the mega volcano known as Yellowstone National Park. So, warmer ground due to geothermal activity that is connected to Yellowstone and radon may be what is responsible for warmer tap water.

Also, the really big holes found in Siberia may be yet another side effect of all this.

I would still like to know if all groundwater around the world is connected into one big supply.

P.M.


There is your problem Alex Jones... 2/3 of what he says is generally made up. He gets people worried about nothing. Dont believe anything he says until you research it first. He just has you paranoid.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 02:31 PM
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a reply to: theworldisnotenough

Howdy,

Do not be offended, but I do believe that Fukushima has nothing to do with your water. It has been very warm in the past few years, and I'd chalk your "hot cold" water up to simple solar heating if the pipes aren't too deep.

As for the salt water encroachment into aquifers, yes, that happens in coastal areas and it is a big problem. Of course, drilling a well is always a problem, but salt water can have two sources (ocean and mineral) so the biggest problem is figuring out whether the ocean is responsible or if minerals are responsible... It's done by comparing isotopes ratios, but it's bad news regardless of source.

That said, I doubt very much that you'd be getting heavy radioisotopes from Fukushima even on the west coast of America. Consider the mass and density of a radioactive element, it won't float very far...

Regards,
Hydeman



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 02:48 PM
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a reply to: snypwsd

a clue for u,,

in a hot water heating sytem , the medium water,,as opposed to air in a warm air system,,which is used to conduct heat Energy measures in ( ),,
it takes one btu of heat energy to raise a ,,,,fill in the blank,, one degree C.


in other words Energy can only be transfered ,,,not destroyed
edit on 7/30/2014 by BobAthome because: clarification.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 05:50 PM
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a reply to: theworldisnotenough

Is this a joke post? You live in America, right? You do know that Fukushima is in Japan? Like, across the other side of the Pacific, almost halfway round the world?

How long do you think your water pipes are?

When my tap water runs warm it is usually because someone else in the house has been running the hot water. The pipes run close to each other and share the heat a little.
edit on 30-7-2014 by Rob48 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 06:36 PM
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originally posted by: Rob48
a reply to: theworldisnotenough

Is this a joke post? You live in America, right? You do know that Fukushima is in Japan? Like, across the other side of the Pacific, almost halfway round the world?

How long do you think your water pipes are?

When my tap water runs warm it is usually because someone else in the house has been running the hot water. The pipes run close to each other and share the heat a little.


His last couple of post about Fukushima have been completely uneducated and his questions could have been easily answered with a little research and after his question is answered he comes up with a bunch of what if and you never know type stuff and never sources his information beside some things like I heard on youtube or wikipedia said. I tried to get to him with facts and scientific papers in his last one but I guess that didn't seem to work.






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