Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

Orkney Excavation Reveals 5000 year old Temple Complex

page: 1
29
<<   2 >>

log in

join
+5 more 
posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 07:18 AM
link   
Some extremely exciting news - an excavation on Orkney has revealed that Maes Howe, the Ring of Brodgar and the standing Stones of Stennes were somehow linked in a neolithic palace complex.




The archaeological site, known as the Ness of Brodgar, covers an area of over 6 acres and consists of the remains of housing, remnants of slate roofs, paved walkways, coloured facades, decorated stone slabs, a massive stone wall with foundations, and a large building described as a Neolithic ‘cathedra’ or ‘palace’, inhabited from at least 3,500 BC to the close of the Neolithic period more than a millennium and a half later.

“Their workmanship was impeccable. The imposing walls they built would have done credit to the Roman centurions who, some 30 centuries later, would erect Hadrian’s Wall in another part of Britain. Cloistered within those walls were dozens of buildings, among them one of the largest roofed structures built in prehistoric northern Europe. It was more than 80ft long and 60ft wide, with walls 13ft thick,” said Roff Smith, author of an article on the Ness of Brodgar to be released in the August edition of National Geographic.






A huge quantity of art, figurines, axes and mace heads, miniature thumb pots and flint knives is currently being unearthed - by large the biggest collection of Neolithic artifacts in Britain.




What the Ness is telling us is that this was a much more integrated landscape than anyone ever suspected,” said archaeologist Nick Card, excavation director with the Archaeology Institute at the University of the Highlands and Islands. “All these monuments are inextricably linked in some grand theme we can only guess at. The people who built all this were a far more complex and capable society than has usually been portrayed.” -





I can't wait to see how this story unfolds, and learn more about the purpose of this site. Only a year or two ago it was discovered that Maes Howe had been designed to create an audio effect on the listener:




Aaron Watson (University of Reading) and sound technician David Keating tested the sound properties of Scotland’s megalithic chambers at Orkney and at Caithness and revealed some startling discoveries. “Tests have now shown that the chambers were built to create sonic effects which include what we call today the Helmholtz Resonance – the sound created when one blows across the top of a glass bottle- and sub-sonic vibrations, which may have altered the states of worshipper’s (moods).” (The Quest for the Celtic Key- MacLeod & Robertson)




Ancient Origins

Orkneyjar dig diary




posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 07:32 AM
link   
I would imagine given how successful that Neolithic civilisation was, digging a hole anywhere on those islands will probably uncover something seriously cool.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 08:18 AM
link   
a reply to: beansidhe

Wonderful Find.

The harmonic sound is to "awaken" or "open" the mind. They seem like a very advanced society. If only technology was given to them the ability to carve out crystal into a bowl and resonate its harmonic sound of the universe, I ponder to think how the world would have change.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 08:28 AM
link   
wow that is awesome!

i am surprised it was not picked up earlier ,the site is just asking for a stronghold .

maybe we should be looking in these obvious geographical areas more, with that one basic common sense .

good post

edit on 30-7-2014 by capstan because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 09:28 AM
link   
That is incredible!

For people to have lived so far North thousands of years ago with no electricity, gas, radio, emergency services is astounding. I can only imagine how bad the storms and storm surges must have been to need 13 feet thick walls.

At those latitudes, daytime in Winter would consist of just twilight from 10am to 3pm and darkness at all other times. I can just imagine what those stormy nights would be like with families huddled together around a fire with their chickens, pigs and goats to keep them company, with the sound of crashing waves and howling winds. In Summer, there would be no dark nights, just twilight between 9am and 3pm, with still enough sunlight to do work.

If they had to go anywhere, it would have had to have been by boat.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 09:38 AM
link   
a reply to: stormcell

I'm an Aberdonian by birth, and I hear you! There is something about a North East winter which actually gets into your bones. They're a special kind of cold and dark.
This is becoming a seriouly impressive dig as it seems that this was no ordinary settlement, maybe a teaching college, or astronomical observatory, perhaps?
I think it was Caesar who wrote that in his day (50 BC ish) there were over 200 druid colleges in Britain which may already have been ancient.

I know that a lot of Orkney has been sunk over the years, but still you're right, people would have travelled by boat. It makes me wonder who all was coming up, and why?



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 09:51 AM
link   
a reply to: SirKonstantin

It's really amazing, I agree. And yet their ancestors were building observatories almost 5000 years earlier!

The world's oldest calendar in Aberdeenshire field




posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 10:09 AM
link   
a reply to: beansidhe

We Should Use this Instead of Those DoucheBag Mayans.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 10:42 AM
link   
a reply to: SirKonstantin

Lol, those pesky latecomers!



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 10:47 AM
link   

originally posted by: beansidhe
a reply to: stormcell

I'm an Aberdonian by birth, and I hear you! There is something about a North East winter which actually gets into your bones. They're a special kind of cold and dark.
This is becoming a seriouly impressive dig as it seems that this was no ordinary settlement, maybe a teaching college, or astronomical observatory, perhaps?
I think it was Caesar who wrote that in his day (50 BC ish) there were over 200 druid colleges in Britain which may already have been ancient.

I know that a lot of Orkney has been sunk over the years, but still you're right, people would have travelled by boat. It makes me wonder who all was coming up, and why?


I'm from Aberdeen myself
I agree, those cold and damp dark nights are the worst. Hearing the roof slates rattling and the window frames whistling in those storms. Everything from newspapers to toilet paper gets cold and damp and even freezes


I looked for some references, and back then, Orkney and the Shetlands would have been connected by land bridges, and the North Sea didn't even exist:

en.wikipedia.org...

Initially, sea levels were lower than at present due to the large volume of ice that remained. This meant that the Orkney archipelago and many of the Inner Hebridean islands were attached to the mainland, as was the present-day island of Great Britain to Continental Europe. Much of the present-day North Sea was also dry land until after 4000 BC.

People must have come across from Norway, perhaps on Summer exploration trips. I can only imagine what discoveries could be made from excavating the sea bed of the North Sea around Orkney.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 12:32 PM
link   
a reply to: stormcell

Hey fit like! Nice to meet you

We had steel window frames in our house - they'd take the top layer of skin off your hand if you touched them in the morning, lol!

Ah, I didn't realise there had been land bridges, I hadn't realised how much of the islands had sunk/ been covered by water in such a (relatively) short space of time. The areas around (and now under) the North Sea must hold a great many clues to our history.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 01:52 PM
link   
Another view on the site

Link



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 02:10 PM
link   
a reply to: Hanslune

Thank you very much. I like the angle the blog you linked takes, of the final (?) feast at the complex. This view also seems to becoming more prevalent:




In the last thirty years there has emerged a growing consensus that Orkney and the far north of Scotland were not an outpost of Neolithic life in Britain. Rather they were the centre and that innovations in pottery and circle building radiated out across the UK from there to such provincial dumps as the Thames Valley and the Salisbury Plain.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 02:20 PM
link   
a reply to: beansidhe

Amazing finds going on there by the sound of it.

13 feet thick walls...that's big.

Slate roof, foundations, painted house walls...sounds like any modern village today doesn't it.

Wonder how much that water has risen over the millennia? Maybe originally, this site was high up on a ridge line with valley's either side of the ridge.

Sometimes i regret not getting into archaeology as a profession when i was younger, so many amazing things to find and discover how people once lived.

With those standing stone circles each end of the settlement, it could be this was an astronomical 'University' of sorts. There may yet be gob-smacking finds buried that show this was a quasi-religious college, with astronomy as its focus of learning.

Thanks OP, S&F.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 02:42 PM
link   
a reply to: beansidhe

Great find, thanks. I would love to visit the area out that way. I've always thought there's much more hiding away on (and between) the islands of Scotland. The site somewhat reminds me of the flat ring complex of Thornborough with its triple ring layout.

I've ordered The Quest For The Celtic Key book, very intriguing reading from the looks of the reviews.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 03:02 PM
link   
a reply to: MysterX

I'm sure I read that they had slate roofs at Skara Brae too, in other words their stone walled, slate roofed houses were almost identical to the one I'm writing from now.
I like the thought of a university - it fits with other patterns, and that Orkney was once the hub in a wheel of western european learning.

It's a real eye-opener to think of organised schools in Britain so long ago, a fresh way to think of our neolithic relatives.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 03:04 PM
link   
a reply to: firesnake

It's a great book, hope you enjoy it!
Painterz is right I think, you could really just point in any direction and start digging, there seems to be a wealth of artifacts under our feet.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 04:38 PM
link   
Nice find, there is so much of our ancient past that we still have to unearth it really does change the way we think of these past civilizations and their accomplishments.
Also a fellow Aberdonian here, it's nice to see more people from the north east in the ATS community.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 05:03 PM
link   
a reply to: mclarenmp4

We teach our children more about ancient Egypt than our own land. But then given the choice between excavating the mysteries of the middle east or a drizzle-soaked field in Montrose, I can understand the motivations of archaeologists! Funding too, I guess, is an issue.

I'm excited to think what else will come from this dig, because already the story emerging is something very different to our current understanding. And thank you for the welcome, this quean is very pleased to meet all you Dons!



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 05:21 PM
link   

originally posted by: beansidhe




Thanks for the news, beansidhe
Any idea how they concluded that the buildings/houses in this pic' were constructed in the depicted fashion?
Put another way - what confidence do you have in the artistic rendering?

Thanks!






top topics



 
29
<<   2 >>

log in

join


Help ATS Recover with your Donation.
read more: Help ATS Recover With Your Contribution