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Quantum Cheshire Cat

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posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 08:59 PM
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Physicists at the University of Vienna have managed to seperate a Beam of neutrons from there magnetic moment, en.wikipedia.org... , Now while this in itself seem's interesting it is the ramifications of this research which are far more exciting, think science fiction intertial displacement which would allow an object to displace it's inertia and so perform otherwise impossible manouvres as well as accelerate or decelerate.
Now I am taking a leap here so perhaps the Physicists whom frequent ATS can better inform us of this breakthrough and it's potential ramifications, also this is at the extremely early stage research so even if it does play into that scenario it will not be directly linked though this has proven the principle that an object can be seperated from it's property's.

Here is the BBC article.
www.bbc.co.uk...

ATS please treat this as a mere placeholder thread and remove as soon as a more concisely worded thread is put in place by a properly educated physicist or long term poster, this is just for general interest as there was no other thread on this at the time that I could find.

edit on 29-7-2014 by LABTECH767 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 09:21 PM
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a reply to: LABTECH767

Why allow this to be just a placeholder until something better comes along? It's a great start to perhaps a very interesting conversation. BTW, ATS staff doesn't remove threads unless they violate T&C, and this one is nowhere near that. Credible source, and IMHO, a fascinating topic. Thanks for sharing....

My thoughts: We are only in the baby steps of understanding quantum physics and the interactions involved. I don't need to be a "Physicist" to read articles freely available on the internet and to do my research, and to realize nobody really understands any of this really well. The worst thing we could do is discount any possibiltites.

When you are talking about Neutrons being obsevered seperated from their magnetic state, wow, that is a leap ahead. That means quantum impostion would also apply to all the atomic particles, and if so, we have some REAL explaining to do.



edit on 7/29/14 by Druid42 because: sp err



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 09:35 PM
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Curiouser and curiouser, I say!




Glimpsing this Cheshire Cat requires what quantum physicists call "weak measurement," whereby you interact with a system so gently that you avoid collapsing it from a quantum state to a classical one.


This statement astounds me and seems to be yet another clue in figuring out the big mystery. Almost as if the quantum world is a glimpse into the projection medium before it hits the white canvas. It's why it "appears" to require our viewing in order for it to be.

We can't see it for what it really is until it reaches the holographic canvas. Everything anymore really seems to point in that direction.



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 09:40 PM
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a reply to: Rosinitiate

And it appears that both states "could" occur, but it boils down to observation. I'd posit that both states DO occur, and the one we experience is the result of our perceptions.

Wickedly deep. *Cheshire Smile*



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 09:43 PM
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originally posted by: Druid42
a reply to: Rosinitiate

And it appears that both states "could" occur, but it boils down to observation. I'd posit that both states DO occur, and the one we experience is the result of our perceptions.

Wickedly deep. *Cheshire Smile*



It does appear that our collective consciousness dictates our perceived reality and our independent observations make it so. So what is that if not a simulation right?



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 09:48 PM
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a reply to: Rosinitiate

Observation effecting quantum state's and that white canvas being the dimension we perceive while reality is to crudely draw an analogy like a concertina of different dimensions all interacting with there variant property's to produce the reality we think we know, of course for a lay person like me it is even stranger but for most physicists set in concrete observation the quantum universe is both a challenge and a headache, still we are already seeing fruit's from some quantum research from cosmology to computing.

There are so many competing theory's though, some don't actually compete but just take a different perspective and will or may eventually merge such as membrane theory (where there is a concept that the universe is the result of brains which are each a universe in there own right in a place outside the universe called superspace) and bubble universes or holographic universe (which is similar to your desription) and string theory or even the old in and out of fashion supergravity theory, all four of these actually work together though may disagree on small minutae but in concert with one another offer a better overall perspective though not yet a unified view.

I am trying to wrack my small brain as to weather they can eventually solve the concept of transporting matter without turning it to energy by displacing it's property's then sending the matter from A to B before allowing the property's to reintegrate after finding a way to displace the residual energy, perhaps by using this in concert with quantum entanglement somehow.

I actually think this is really exciting research and I hope it goes somewhere other with further R&D based applications.

edit on 29-7-2014 by LABTECH767 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 12:50 AM
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Tryna get up to speed here...

Matter is energy, whether kinectic or potential. All matter/mass is made up of atomic particles, and those particles are further reduced to quarks of various nature, and then modern understanding disappears into a quantum foam, where observation creates those very particles.

Ros, you are intimating a simulation, and yes, I tend to agree, in sorts, as opposed to having a bunch of other theories which sorta describe what we are talking about, but not overall acceptable and refutable.

There's this neverending wave of almost knowing ideas that don't really pan out, and until we really think outside the box, we'll be left slopping together our old impressions and trying to make sense of what we've hashed and re-hashed over and over during the past 10-20 years.

But hey, that's how science works, isn't it?



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 12:59 AM
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a reply to: Druid42

Just reminded me of a science fiction novel by Frank Herbert called Man Of Two World's, there is an alien race who created the universe with there mind's but no one knows how or why but on one planet that no one will own up to creating called earth this plant called basil grows, the leaves of the plant they call BAZEEL make these aliens high and it is regarded as an illegal narcotic but all of them take it.
www.goodreads.com...
I wonder just how many sci fi books most of these physicists read and how the mental feedback on the nature of the perceived universe is effected.
Eventually the last of the aliens becomes extinct but one has his consciousness survive inside a human.
edit on 30-7-2014 by LABTECH767 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 11:18 AM
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originally posted by: Druid42
Credible source, and IMHO, a fascinating topic.
Yes, it's from a peer-reviewed journal so the source is credible, but like any published research still subject to further scrutiny.


My thoughts: We are only in the baby steps of understanding quantum physics and the interactions involved. I don't need to be a "Physicist" to read articles freely available on the internet and to do my research, and to realize nobody really understands any of this really well. The worst thing we could do is discount any possibiltites.

When you are talking about Neutrons being obsevered seperated from their magnetic state, wow, that is a leap ahead. That means quantum impostion would also apply to all the atomic particles, and if so, we have some REAL explaining to do.
The result was predicted before the experiment was done so it's not surprising in that respect. However we still don't have a complete consensus on the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics, so we can't say for sure what is actually going on in any quantum experiment where such interpretation is required, and of course this is no exception in that regard.





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