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When it comes to gluten-free diets, unfounded beliefs abound

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posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 06:51 PM
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When it comes to gluten-free diets, unfounded beliefs abound


While necessary for some, many people eat gluten-free diets because they believe they'll gain certain health benefits, but these beliefs are not all supported by research, a University of Florida nutrition expert says.

Those with celiac disease, or about 1 percent of the U.S. population, must follow a gluten-free diet because it's the only treatment for their condition, said Karla Shelnutt, a UF assistant professor in family, youth and community sciences. But gluten-free diets can lack essential nutrients if a person does not eat a balanced diet and/or take a multivitamin supplement.

Unlike their conventional counterparts, refined gluten-free foods, for the most part, are not enriched or fortified with essential vitamins and minerals. "If I'm a college student, and I want to lose weight, and I read on the Internet that a gluten-free diet is the way to go, I may start avoiding products that contain essential nutrients such as those found in cereal grains fortified with folic acid," Shelnutt said. "The problem is you have a lot of healthy women who choose a gluten-free diet because they believe it is healthier for them and can help them lose weight and give them healthier skin."

The $10.5-billion gluten-free food and beverage industry has grown 44 percent from 2011-13 as the rate of celiac disease diagnoses increases, along with awareness of gluten-free foods, according to Mintel, a market research company. Mintel estimates sales will top $15 billion in 2016.

One of Shelnutt's doctoral students, Caroline Dunn, wanted to know if gluten-free labeling has any impact on how consumers perceive the foods' taste and nutrition. In a one-day experiment on the UF campus in Gainesville in February, 97 people ate cookies and chips, all gluten-free. Half were labeled "gluten-free"; the other half labeled "conventional."

Participants then rated each food on a nine-point scale for how much they liked the flavor and texture. They also filled out a questionnaire, said Shelnutt, a faculty member with UF's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.

About a third of participants said they believed gluten-free foods to be healthier than those labeled "conventional," a figure she thought would be much lower. While avoiding gluten-containing foods can reduce carbohydrate intake, thus helping some lose weight, many health experts say a gluten-free diet is no healthier than a conventional diet except for those with celiac disease.


People make counter "You're fine as long as you take a multivitamin" and while that is true, most people don't take their multivitamins properly.


In order for multivitamins to work best, you need to take them with certain foods that will help your body absorb the vitamins & most people don't do that.

edit on 29-7-2014 by knoledgeispower because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 07:04 PM
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Besides the Gluten - This is why I Don't Eat Bread.




posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 07:05 PM
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I don't have problems with gluten but I do have a problem with lots of breads. I think it is something to do with my hypoglycemia. A multigrain bread seems to work all right and I designed a bread that I can tolerate better. Now I am not quite sure what the problem is, maybe the type of yeast used in many store breads or maybe something else.

It is really hard to test this as there are so many variables. It also may not apply to many other people.

I do feel there is something wrong with many of our commercial breads here in America though, it is a problem area. Is it the gluten or the source of the vitamin enrichment of the bread. Chemicals excreted by yeasts in too much abundance. Or is it the yeast used in these commercial breads or another additive. Is it that many people have a magnesium deficiency and magnesium is necessary for breaking down starches. By avoiding gluten they are lessening their starches and also lowering glutamine levels.

There are a lot of possibilities. different people could be having different reasons for feeling better yet ea lot of people are thinking it is the gluten. Some people can have an intolerance to this but it could be more than just the gluten.



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 07:38 PM
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a reply to: BoogieMan911

You should make your own bread then. Fresh baked bread is soooo yummy!!!!

This is the easiest one-loaf yeast bread you will ever bake. The Super Easy Bread for Beginners recipe produces a soft crust and a moist center using the most basic ingredients that can be found in most kitchens.
Prep Time: 3 hours
Cook Time: 45 minutes
Total Time: 3 hours, 45 minutes
Ingredients:

3/4 cup warm water
1 package active dry yeast
1 tsp salt
1-1/2 tbsp sugar
1 tbsp vegetable shortening
1/2 cup milk
3 cups all-purpose flour, approximately

Preparation:

In large bowl, add the warm water. Slowly stir in dry yeast. Continue to stir until yeast is dissolved.

Add salt, sugar, shortening, and milk to bowl. Stir.

Mix in the first 2 cups of flour.

If needed, begin adding more flour, one tablespoon at a time, until the dough chases the spoon around the bowl.

You do not need to use up all the flour called for in this recipe, or you may need more flour than called for. The amounts vary depending on many factors, including weather, which is why most bread recipes only give an approximate amount of flour needed.

Turn dough out onto floured board and knead, adding small spoonfuls of flour as needed, until the dough is soft and smooth, not sticky to the touch.

Put dough in buttered bowl, turn dough over so that the top of dough is greased. Cover and let rise in warm spot for 1 hour.

Punch down dough. Turn out onto floured board and knead.

Preheat oven at 375 degrees F.

Form dough into loaf and set in buttered bread pan. Cover and let rise for about 30 minutes.

Score dough by cutting three slashes across the top with a sharp knife. Put in oven and bake for about 45 minutes or until golden brown.

Turn out bread and let cool on a rack or clean dishtowel.



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 07:41 PM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
I don't have problems with gluten but I do have a problem with lots of breads. I think it is something to do with my hypoglycemia. A multigrain bread seems to work all right and I designed a bread that I can tolerate better. Now I am not quite sure what the problem is, maybe the type of yeast used in many store breads or maybe something else.

It is really hard to test this as there are so many variables. It also may not apply to many other people.

I do feel there is something wrong with many of our commercial breads here in America though, it is a problem area. Is it the gluten or the source of the vitamin enrichment of the bread. Chemicals excreted by yeasts in too much abundance. Or is it the yeast used in these commercial breads or another additive. Is it that many people have a magnesium deficiency and magnesium is necessary for breaking down starches. By avoiding gluten they are lessening their starches and also lowering glutamine levels.

There are a lot of possibilities. different people could be having different reasons for feeling better yet ea lot of people are thinking it is the gluten. Some people can have an intolerance to this but it could be more than just the gluten.


Hate to say it but it's probably because of all the food substitutes that the U.S allows in it's food that is bothering you.

People say "Our bodies weren't made to be able to handle meat" what about "Our bodies aren't made to be able to handle woodpulp" Sure it won't kill you but it's not something that should be consumed either.

What is in the bread recipe that you have that is different than most?



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 08:29 PM
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a reply to: knoledgeispower
My youngest daughter has the gluten sensitivity, and frankly I am fine with people without the sensitivity wanting gluten free products. The more people request them, the more available and wide spread they are. A decade ago no one, hardly, knew what gluten was.



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 09:39 PM
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a reply to: knoledgeispower

A tablespoon of each of these. Whole grain Rye, whole grain barley, and wheat germ. I also just use Red Star yeast, the other type of fast yeast has a different taste that the wife and I don't think tastes good. If the people making yeast think we cannot taste a little difference, they must be nuts.


I actually have a thread on my bread.
edit on 29-7-2014 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 10:20 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse
Interesting. Have you had any problems with a different home made bread recipe?



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 10:22 PM
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originally posted by: bbracken677
a reply to: knoledgeispower
My youngest daughter has the gluten sensitivity, and frankly I am fine with people without the sensitivity wanting gluten free products. The more people request them, the more available and wide spread they are. A decade ago no one, hardly, knew what gluten was.


That is true but people also need to realize the true value of what they are eating & this study will help with that when it comes to understanding a gluten free diet



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 10:36 PM
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a reply to: knoledgeispower

If I don't put the Rye flour and the wheat germ in I seem to have problems. The Barley flour just gives it a good taste. I worked on this for a few years. Finding one my wife and daughter also like, especially the texture, was difficult.

Both my daughters really like this bread because it doesn't bother their stomachs.

Now the other yeast does not seem to make me feel bad, but the bread tastes better with the type of yeast in Red star yeast. That super fast yeast just seems to not taste as good. We buy a one pound block of the active dry yeast about once a year.

The little bit of sugar I use makes the bread taste better. I forgot it one day and the bread was not nearly as good for some reason. Less than a teaspoon makes a big difference.



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 11:12 PM
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a reply to: knoledgeispower

Being a part of that one percent, I would like to repeat a sentiment made by another poster. The interest in this diet makes food that I medically need available for me even in Podunk Alaska. I agree that many of the fads that come around need to be researched before people decide to follow them, just like any new fad. Many thing have their own pros and cons, but the popularity of this particular fad has made some resemblance of my former life possible. I know that it is incredibly selfish, but after vomiting for 24 hours from being contaminated I have had to become that person when it comes to food that even enters the front door of my house.

On the other hand you are right about fewer nutrients in processed food, but that holds true in general. Many gluten free diets consist mostly of fresh foods since they are safe. In my case I have even traded out my cheesecake crust to one made out of almond flour and flaxseed meal, it's the first time in his life that my husband actually voluntarily eats flax in any form.

Mindfulness about what we consume in general would solve a lot of problems, but please don't be so fast to discount the minority when thinking about adherents to these fads. Supply and demand is a very real phenomenon.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 12:22 AM
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a reply to: knoledgeispower

its not the gluten. its the carbohydrates.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 03:03 AM
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What is gluten? The thing that makes bread bearable.
Gluteen, from the Latin word meaning stfu.
edit on 30-7-2014 by rockintitz because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 03:22 AM
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Slice of glutein free bread has twice as much carbs than normal bread. Wheat flour has about 70g carbs per 100g and glutein free flours has about 86g/100g not much difference there but why glutein free products contains more carbs comes from the texture of the flour, glutein free flours texture is very fine and for one "slice of glutein free bread " is needed more flour in grams than normal bread. Couple slices of glutein free bread can easily hold all the carbs needed for one meal. So its not necessarily for losing weight ( unless you skip most of other sources of carbs.. not recommened ).

What comes to multivitamins, doesn´t hurt tho but these does not absorbs to your system in a way vitamin intake from real food does, if you are healthy ( without celiac disease) you dont need to take multivitamins just get the vitamins from healthy diet, vitamin D is only needed . My kid and hubby have celiac disease and kid has type 1 diabetes ( reason why we calculate carbs ) to them healthy diet is enough and they take vitamin D as an extra at winter time.
edit on 30-7-2014 by dollukka because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 08:32 AM
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a reply to: knoledgeispower

First of all, I would dispute that "our bodies are not made to handle meat" as our teeth are not those of an herbivore but, rather, an omnivore. We have canines....to what purpose if not to rend meat?

I make my own bread often. I enjoy it as a hobby, as I also make cheese and love to cook. If you wish to test whether it is commercially made bread that causes problems try making your own. Use your own bread for a few weeks and see if you can tell a difference in the way you feel. Of course, discounting the placebo effect will be problematic since you may feel better without a true cause. On the other hand, if you feel better who cares why?



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 08:41 AM
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a reply to: bbracken677

Correct....we are omnivores.

A few thousand years ago humans couldn't really process grains, milk, and a few other cornerstones of civilization. If we ate the diet of our ancestors the heavy protein would destroy our kidneys.

So we are no longer geared towards protein only diets.

but my body type handles a high protein diet far better than a carb rich diet. I handle milk just fine, but eating more than 50g carbs a day creates health problems for me..

As a people we are in transition, "evolving" in relation to the crops we are growing.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 12:32 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

A million years ago and less, our ancestors needed the protein to be able to grow and support a brain. They didn't have the protein rich foods we have today or anything like them.

These days, one can survive on a vegan diet, but frankly, every vegan I have ever seen that had been true to the diet for a period of at least a couple of years do not look horribly healthy to me. They look like someone I would describe as sickly....

I tried going vegetarian back in the 80s and just could not eat enough to support my activity level. Constantly hungry and dissatisfied. I had to eat 4 meals a day and that was not enough to keep me happy. Gave it up and have not looked back.

I like bacon way too much to ever go there again LOL.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 12:46 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

It's funny you mention that we are not equipped to process as much protein as our ancestors.
One of the main side effects of the gluten free diets for me was my reaction to protein. I actually had a friend ask me if I was pregnant last winter because my belly would, and still sometimes does, swell after a high protein intake. I actually have to take papain, a papaya enzyme, to help my body digest it. The foods I have the least reaction to are fresh vegetables, too bad it's impossible for me to give up meat.

I agree that our systems seem to be trying to find a better equilibrium. Celiac is genetic, but only recently has been getting so prevalent. I personally feel that our altered foods can't help. Some wheat has even been genetically engineered to contain massive amounts of gluten beyond what naturally occurs in the plant. In light of that alone, it does not surprise me that people without Celiac are also having more low grade reactions.

And Dolluka, I want to thank you so very much for that little tidbit about the psyllium husks!! I would have never guessed that one on my own, they contribute nicely to a recent batch of crackers that I made too!
edit on 30-7-2014 by woodsmom because: Poor grammar



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 01:27 PM
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originally posted by: woodsmom
a reply to: knoledgeispower

Being a part of that one percent, I would like to repeat a sentiment made by another poster. The interest in this diet makes food that I medically need available for me even in Podunk Alaska. I agree that many of the fads that come around need to be researched before people decide to follow them, just like any new fad. Many thing have their own pros and cons, but the popularity of this particular fad has made some resemblance of my former life possible. I know that it is incredibly selfish, but after vomiting for 24 hours from being contaminated I have had to become that person when it comes to food that even enters the front door of my house.

On the other hand you are right about fewer nutrients in processed food, but that holds true in general. Many gluten free diets consist mostly of fresh foods since they are safe. In my case I have even traded out my cheesecake crust to one made out of almond flour and flaxseed meal, it's the first time in his life that my husband actually voluntarily eats flax in any form.

Mindfulness about what we consume in general would solve a lot of problems, but please don't be so fast to discount the minority when thinking about adherents to these fads. Supply and demand is a very real phenomenon.


I'm sorry if you misunderstood what I saying about a gluten free diet for those who need it. I used to work in grocery stores so I have seen the rise in gluten free products & it is wonderful for those who truly need it. I realized the magnitude of gluten free products when I started working in a bulk food store. It was a celiacs dream because there was an entire aisle dedicated to gluten free products. I had lots of customers telling me how happy they were we carried so many items because they were or had a family member who is a celiac.

I too have to have a strict diet so I understand where you are coming from. If I don't eat properly it comes out both ends, is very painful (to the point where I am flush & sweating) and I remain bloated for a long time.



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 01:32 PM
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originally posted by: bbracken677
a reply to: knoledgeispower

First of all, I would dispute that "our bodies are not made to handle meat" as our teeth are not those of an herbivore but, rather, an omnivore. We have canines....to what purpose if not to rend meat?

I make my own bread often. I enjoy it as a hobby, as I also make cheese and love to cook. If you wish to test whether it is commercially made bread that causes problems try making your own. Use your own bread for a few weeks and see if you can tell a difference in the way you feel. Of course, discounting the placebo effect will be problematic since you may feel better without a true cause. On the other hand, if you feel better who cares why?

I agree & hate it when people say "our bodies aren't able to handle meat". I always counter with "Really, cause last time I checked we've always hunted animals & ate their meat. The only difference is how some eat a lot of meat & the quality of meat is way different"

I've been very lucky that with my IBS like symptoms that I am still able to handle breads & they've become a huge part of my diet because of not having tons of money. Eggs & toast mmmmm or just toast on it's own. If I couldn't eat bread products, that would toss a huge stone in our (bf & mine's) diets & we'd have to spend a lot more money on substitutes.





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