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Is THIS what Hamas gives to their Children for Entertainment?

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posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 05:59 PM
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a reply to: loam

It strikes me weird how the children's learning parrots military training.

Will you die for your country?

Same thing no matter the flavour ...we got lots of them.

Stopping making folks make these decisions would be gentler and more at one for everyone.

(Not busy bee, from romper room....what were they thinking?)


Cheers




posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 07:35 PM
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a reply to: loam

And what's really nuts is how so many Americans support Hamas in their endeavor to destroy Israel...



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 07:42 PM
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What I find just as fascinating as the question posed in the OP is how this same question is being asked right now on cable news and other websites...but it was well known and discussed previously. It couldn't possibly be coordinated could it?

Bubble up some recycled outrage when losing the PR war...



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 08:19 PM
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Is THIS what Israel gives to their children for entertainment?
Bombs to sign, before sending to Arabic Children.



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 08:50 PM
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a reply to: kosmicjack


originally posted by: kosmicjack
What I find just as fascinating as the question posed in the OP is how this same question is being asked right now on cable news and other websites...but it was well known and discussed previously. It couldn't possibly be coordinated could it?

Bubble up some recycled outrage when losing the PR war...


I'm not sure I understand your post.

Could you explain further please?

Are you saying I should have known about these or that my post is coordinated somehow?

edit on 29-7-2014 by loam because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 08:57 PM
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originally posted by: ParanoidAmerican
a reply to: loam

Reminds me a little of the Israeli talk show mocking christians..I think I need to watch some US cartoons and see if the rubbish we watch is any better.....do we know the translations on any of these to be accurate? Even mine?



Link


Seeing how the translations were made by MEMRI tv a propaganda service started and run by ex Israeli intelligence agents chances are they are not accurate. Many people including the State Dept in America has complained about them twisting the words so it seems like people are saying things they really aren't saying.



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 09:07 PM
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a reply to: buster2010




....chances are they are not accurate.



Which is it? Are these specific videos mistranslated or not? I don't speak arabic.

And with regard to some of the images showing children dancing with weapons and bombs, I don't need to speak arabic to get what's going on there.

edit on 29-7-2014 by loam because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 09:23 PM
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a reply to: BoogieMan911

Well, I looked up the apparent origin of that photo.






Kiryat Shmona has been under constant bombardment from South Lebanon since the first day of the conflict. It was a ghost town, explained Shelly. There was not a single person on the streets and all the businesses were closed. The residents who had friends, family or money for alternate housing out of missile range had left, leaving behind the few who had neither the funds nor connections that would allow them to escape the missiles crashing and booming on their town day and night. The noise was terrifying, people were dying outside, the kids were scared out of their minds and they had been told over and over that some man named Nasrallah was responsible for their having to cower underground for days on end.

On the day that photo was taken, the girls had emerged from the underground bomb shelters for the first time in five days. A new army unit had just arrived in the town and was preparing to shell the area across the border. The unit attracted the attention of twelve photojournalists - Israeli and foreign. The girls and their families gathered around to check out the big attraction in the small town - foreigners. They were relieved and probably a little giddy at being outside in the fresh air for the first time in days. They were probably happy to talk to people. And they enjoyed the attention of the photographers.

Apparently one or some of the parents wrote messages in Hebrew and English on the tank shells to Nasrallah. "To Nasrallah with love," they wrote to the man whose name was for them a devilish image on television - the man who mockingly told Israelis, via speeches that were broadcast on Al Manar and Israeli television, that Hezbollah was preparing to launch even more missiles at them. That he was happy they were suffering.

The photograpers gathered around. Twelve of them. Do you know how many that is? It's a lot. And they were all simultaneously leaning in with their long camera lenses, clicking the shutter over and over. The parents handed the markers to the kids and they drew little Israeli flags on the shells. Photographers look for striking images, and what is more striking than pretty, innocent little girls contrasted with the ugliness of war? The camera shutters clicked away, and I guess those kids must have felt like stars, especially since the diversion came after they'd been alternately bored and terrified as they waited out the shelling in their bomb shelters.

Shelly emphasized several times that none of the parents or children had expressed any hatred toward the Lebanese people. No-one expressed any satisfaction at knowing that Lebanese were dying - just as Israelis are dying. Their messages were directed at Nasrallah. None of those people was detached or wise enough to think: "Hang on, tank shell equals death of human beings." They were thinking, tank shell equals stopping the missiles that land on my house. Tank shells will stop that man with the turban from threatening to kill us.

And besides, none of those children had seen images of dead people - either Israeli or Lebanese. Israeli television doesn't broadcast them, nor do the newspapers print them. Even when there were suicide bombings in Israel several times a week for months, none of the Israeli media published gory photos of dead or wounded people. It's a red line in Israel. Do not show dead, bleeding, torn up bodies because the families of the dead will suffer and children will have nightmares. And because it is just in bad taste to use suffering for propaganda purposes.

Those kids had seen news footage of destroyed buildings and infrastructure, but not of the human toll. They had heard over and over that the air force was destroying the buildings that belonged to Hezbollah, the organization responsible for shelling their town and threatening their lives. How many small children would be able to make the connection between tank shells and dead people on their own? How many human beings are able to detach from their own suffering and emotional stress and think about that of the other side? Not many, I suspect.

So, perhaps the parents were not wise when they encouraged their children to doodle on the tank shells. They were letting off a little steam after being cooped up - afraid, angry and isolated - for days. Sometimes people do silly things when they are under emotional stress. Especially when they fail to understand how their childish, empty gesture might be interpreted.

Source.



Not exactly equivalent to the Hamas television shows, is it?



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 09:36 PM
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a reply to: loam

The thread is about what children are being taught. This is what Israeli Children are being Taught.



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 09:40 PM
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a reply to: BoogieMan911

So in your view, that single photo taken under the circumstances described above is equivalent to the dozens upon dozens of Hamas examples, who is the political leadership in Gaza?

M'kay.
edit on 29-7-2014 by loam because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 09:48 PM
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a reply to: Humanity4Ever


Hamas has also recently introduced 'Suicide Kindergarten Camps' for toddlers.

Can you please post a source for this? It needs to be accented.



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 09:48 PM
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a reply to: loam

No, I'm saying that the re-emergence of this story in the midst of conflict is likely coordinated from somewhere, both sides are doing it.



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 09:57 PM
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a reply to: kosmicjack

Well, ok. But prior to today, I'm not sure I was even remotely aware of these videos.

I can see why Israel hates Hamas so much. Terror organization indeed.


edit on 29-7-2014 by loam because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 10:13 PM
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Propaganda flows both ways.

Here we have some wonderful Israelis dancing around artillery shells



Or how about this wonderful Israeli TV show mocking Christianity?



How about some more Israeli TV mocking Jesus & Mary?



This sums it all up




posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 10:35 PM
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a reply to: DerekJR321

I don't see children in your first video. Your second video seems to be the only remotely valid Israeli example I've seen- still need to do some research on it. Your third video, again doesn't seem to be directed towards children. And, your last video mostly repeats stills of the Israeli children signing those tank shells, whose origin is more fully explained above. The rest of the video just shows children around various armaments- not unexpected in a country besieged by war.

Not sure I see how these are equivalent to the Hamas videos, which are far more explicit and directed towards children.

Just sayin'.

edit on 29-7-2014 by loam because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 10:46 PM
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originally posted by: TerryMcGuire
a reply to: Humanity4Ever


Hamas has also recently introduced 'Suicide Kindergarten Camps' for toddlers.

Can you please post a source for this? It needs to be accented.



There are too many sources to link, but here are just a few...

www.mesora.org..." target="_blank" class="postlink" rel="nofollow">vwww.mesora.org...

archive.adl.org...

chersonandmolschky.com...

www.idfblog.com...

www.meforum.org...

books.google.ca... 9jDQRfqoAZA&hl=en&sa=X&ei=RGjYU8LqM4yiyASLt4LoDw&ved=0CFMQ6AEwBw#v=onepage&q=hamas%20suicide%20kindergarten%20camps&f=false

www.examiner.com...

www.childrensrightsinstitute.org...
edit on 29-7-2014 by Humanity4Ever because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 11:01 PM
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a reply to: loam

You're only now being exposed to this? While I don't doubt the hate of Hamas and the lengths they'll go you should really do some research on the producers of these videos. They are run by former head Israeli intelligence types.



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 11:09 PM
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a reply to: loam

Here's a thread I did on MEMRI a long time ago asking the same questions as you. Hopefully it will help shed some light on the subject for ya.

www.abovetopsecret.com...
edit on 29-7-2014 by Swills because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 11:12 PM
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a reply to: Swills

I'm not sure why that's relevant, unless you are claiming they are staged. Are they?

I'd like to see more evidence than some loose relationship with Israeli intelligence. Who in Israel doesn't have such a connection?



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 11:21 PM
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a reply to: loam

Is it staged? Neither you or I speak the language so we don't know for sure but MEMRI has been accused of being Israel's propaganda machine. But at the same time, this is Hamas we are talking about here so I have no doubts they would air such propaganda themselves.

Loose connection to Israel? Nothing loose about it.

en.wikipedia.org...



MEMRI was co-founded in 1998 by Yigal Carmon, a former colonel in the Israeli military intelligence and Meyrav Wurmser, an Israeli-born, American political scientist.


en.wikipedia.org...


Alleged translation inaccuracy[edit]
See also: Tomorrow's Pioneers § Translation controversy
The accuracy of MEMRI's translations are considered "usually accurate" though occasionally disputed and highly selective in what it chooses to translate and in which context it puts things,[55] as in the case of MEMRI's translation of a 2004 Osama bin Laden video, which MEMRI defended.[5][47][56][57][58]
Following the 7 July 2005 London bombings, Al Jazeera invited Hani al-Sebai, an Islamist living in Britain, to take part in a discussion on the event. For one segment of the discussion in regard to the victims, MEMRI provided the following translation of al-Sebai's words:
the term civilians does not exist in Islamic religious law. Dr Karmi is sitting here, and I am sitting here, and I’m familiar with religious law. There is no such term as civilians in the modern Western sense. People are either at war or not.[59]
Al-Sebai subsequently claimed that MEMRI had mistranslated his interview, and that among other errors, he had actually said:
there is no term in Islamic jurisprudence called civilians. Dr Karmi is here sitting with us, and he's very familiar with the jurisprudence. There are fighters and non-fighters. Islam is against the killing of innocents. The innocent man cannot be killed according to Islam.
By leaving out the condemnation of the "killing of innocents" entirely, Mohammed El Oifi writing in Le Monde diplomatique argued that this translation left the implication that civilians (the innocent) are considered a legitimate target.[46] Several British newspapers subsequently used MEMRI's translation to run headlines such as "Islamic radical has praised the suicide bomb attacks on the capital"[60] prompting al-Sebai to demand an apology and take legal action. In his view, MEMRI's translation was also "an incitement to have me arrested by the British authorities".[61]
Halim Barakat described MEMRI as a "a propaganda organization dedicated to representing Arabs and Muslims as anti-semites". Barakat claims an essay he wrote for the Al-Hayat Daily of London titled The Wild Beast that Zionism Created: Self-Destruction, was mistranslated by MEMRI and retitled as Jews Have Lost Their Humanity. Barakat further stated "Every time I wrote Zionism, MEMRI replaced the word by Jew or Judaism. They want to give the impression that I'm not criticizing Israeli policy, but that what I'm saying is anti-Semitic."[42][45][46] According to Barakat, he was subject to widespread condemnation from faculty and his office was "flooded with hatemail".[62][63] Fellow Georgetown faculty member Aviel Roshwald accused Barakat in an article he published of promoting a "demonization of Israel and of Jews".[64] Supported by Georgetown colleagues, Barakat denied the claim,[65] which Roshwald had based on MEMRI's translation of Barakat's essay.[64]
In 2007, CNN correspondent Atika Shubert and Arabic translators accused MEMRI of mistranslating portions of a Palestinian children's television programme.
Media watchdog MEMRI translates one caller as saying – quote – 'We will annihilate the Jews'," said Shubert. "But, according to several Arabic speakers used by CNN, the caller actually says 'The Jews are killing us.'[66][67]
CNN's Glenn Beck later invited Yigal Carmon onto his program to comment on the alleged mistranslation. Carmon criticized CNN's translators understanding of Arabic stating: "Even someone who doesn't know Arabic would listen to the tape and would hear the word 'Jews' is at the end, and also it means it is something to be done to the Jews, not by the Jews. And she (Octavia Nasr) insisted, no the word is in the beginning. I said: 'Octavia, you just don't get it. It is at the end.'" Brian Whitaker, a Middle East editor for the Guardian newspaper (UK) later pointed out that the word order in Arabic is not the same as in English: "the verb comes first and so a sentence in Arabic which literally says 'Are shooting at us the Jews' means 'The Jews are shooting at us.'"[55]
Naomi Sakr, a professor of Media Policy at the University of Westminster has charged that specific MEMRI mistranslations, occurring during times of international tension, have generated hostility towards Arab journalists.[68]
Brian Whitaker wrote in a blog for The Guardian newspaper that in the translation of the video, showing Farfour eliciting political comments from a young girl named Sanabel, the MEMRI transcript misrepresents the segment. Farfour asks Sanabel what she will do and, after a pause says "I'll shoot", MEMRI attributed the phrase said by Farfour, ("I'll shoot"), as the girl's reply while ignoring her actual reply ("I'm going to draw a picture").[69] Whitaker and others commented that a statement uttered by the same child, ("We're going to [or want to] resist"), had been given an unduly aggressive interpretation by MEMRI as ("We want to fight"). Also, where MEMRI translated the girl as saying the highly controversial remark ("We will annihilate the Jews"), Whitaker and others, including Arabic speakers used by CNN, insist that based on careful listening to the low quality video clip, the girl is saying "Bitokhoona al-yahood", variously interpreted as, "The Jews [will] shoot us"[69] or "The Jews are killing us."[70]

more on link...

edit on 29-7-2014 by Swills because: (no reason given)




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