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Starting a New Career - Any advice?

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posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 12:47 AM
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Hello everyone. So I am super stoked right now. I just got hired on to a wonderful electrical contracting company in the Denver area. I am very young - I have one year of University under my belt however I am going to be dropping out to pursue a career in skilled trade. ( I am sure some will praise this decision and others will call me a fool)

Anyways, I am officially an Apprentice Electrician as of today and will be reporting to my first job site on Wednesday. I will be working commercial construction sites for the next 4 years whilst going to Apprentice school and pursuing a Journeyman certification.

I have zero experience in construction but I am more than ready to learn and I definitely feel as if I am physically and mentally up to the task. Before this job - I have only ever worked in restaurants here and there (minimum wage garbage) and I am just so happy to finally be starting a 'real job' with benefits and all that jazz.

I am sure there are dozens of members here who have worked construction and the least and probably a few more who have done electrical work more specifically.

So my question is - any general advice? I know it is going to be dangerous, long hot days, but I feel the work will be very rewarding! The company I am with is all about safety and providing opportunities to their employees to move up within the company. It is a non union company.

I pretty much expect to get a bunch of crap from the other guys due to my age and my lack of experience that much I am anticipating for. Other than that -

I would love to hear ANY input from more members with more life experience than I.

Thank you for your time ATSers.

edit on 29-7-2014 by lightedhype because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 01:18 AM
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a reply to: lightedhype

Congratulations!!

General advice:
1. Focus on learning 'your' job. When you're not doing that ...
2. Look around and see where 'the team' needs an extra pair of hands.
3. Always keep earning what the boss is paying.
4. Try and figure out the 'management' role of what you're doing. You won't always be young.

After you've got your apprenticeship under your belt, get your EE. You should look for a school who will credit you for your OJT ... a LOT of credit.

Is it okay to say, "I'm proud of you!!"



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 01:47 AM
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a reply to: Snarl

Thank you much for the advice. Means especially a lot coming from an esteemed ATS member such as yourself.

I will definitely keep what you said in mind and will certainly look for such a school! That is some great advice for a future pathway.


Haha, I believe it is okay for you to say that. After all, we are all friends here despite the arguments.

Thanks again mate.



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 01:49 AM
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Keep head small and feet on the ground.
Watch what you say to who.
Never complain or criticise unless prompted for a constructive opinion.
Always be the first in and last out of the office.
Remember your manners at all times because others will.
Be concientious and helpful.
Ask questions and gain knowledge.
And last but not least - always listen!!
Goodluck



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 01:55 AM
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I have a degree in Business Management if I had my time again Id be a tradesman,your pay will not be great during your apprenticeship but once you have your trade you should be able to etch out a good living without all the heartburn of corporate life,I think you made a good decision tradespeople are at a premium graduates a dime a dozen.



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 02:14 AM
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a reply to: RP2SticksOfDynamite

Thank you for your insight. I will be sure to watch my manners as I know many out there will know much more than I and have rightly earned their place above me!



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 02:18 AM
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a reply to: khnum

You make a very valid point. It is good to hear this from somebody who traveled the other route so to speak. Graduates certainly are a dime a dozen these days. I have a step brother with a degree in psychology. He cannot find good work - so he had to go back to school. Basically he can get a doctorate and be a psychologist/therapist or he can get a masters and....teach psychology. He is rather disappointing with his options and I do not want to be in that position later on down the road.

I was pursuing a degree in Computer Science. Computers will always be a passion of mine and despite learning this trade I still hope to one day down the road learn how to code like a professional and all that good stuff. I can dream.



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 02:39 AM
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a reply to: lightedhype




Computers will always be a passion of mine


If you ever hear that your boss's computer needs TLC, get in there and fix it.

People who fix the boss's computers never get fired and are usually promoted before others.

This is a fact of life!

It will also make your life a little better as you are likely to get all those cool jobs of running computer cable everywhere.

P



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 02:43 AM
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Im am both a tradesman and a computer science graduate. In fact a Ceng!
Whatever your path, and i prefer the corporate one in terms of benefits (and in my case at least income also 3 x), just enjoy what you do or change it! Life is too short.
Again the best of luck



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 02:52 AM
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Congratulations .. never stop studying / learning strive to improve your skill .



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 03:18 AM
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28 years in construction skilled trades. I would say do not complain. Keep many types of cold weather and rain gear handy.

Learn to pack a good lunch. sounds funny but I'm serious. Microwave food everyday gets old fast.

You may be expected to get in early and make coffee, never let the trash can in your break/lunch area overflow. Do not constantly talk about how yourself and how great you are.

There is no such thing as a dumb question and do not be afraid of saying you are not comfortable if asked to perform a task you feel is dangerous or above your skill level.

Stay safe and enjoy a great career.... Oh first and foremost remember always the Tinners rule lol



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 03:55 AM
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a reply to: lightedhype

Once you feel comfortable bending pipe and pulling wire, learn controls. Controls are PLC's, Magnetic starters, VFD's, all motor controls, computer integration, sensors etc. This is the niche in the trade where the money is. Don't touch anything you're unsure about in the beginning, you don't get too many mistakes in the electrical field, sometimes only one. I can't stress enough use good tools, Klein is good stuff it could save your life. Find that person you have confidence in stay close ask questions, and listen. God gave you two ears and one mouth so you can listen twice as much as you can speak.

It is rewarding work that pays well, is an excellent trade, always necessary in todays world. Learn the business end of the business.

And the rest, you can read Snarl's post it is spot on.

Although controls pays better than a EE, it has you out and about instead of behind a desk. Any technical questions PM me I will help if I can.


Congratulations as well, enjoy I loved working jobsites. Crew comradery is something you don't get in most places like you do on a construction crew.



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 05:32 AM
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a reply to: MarlinGrace

One and only one thing I would saybisbstay away from gauges in you ears, tattoos that are obvious, and sagging your pants like a damn idiot. It might not matter too much now. But you are establishing a reputation and all that crap will hinder your ability to grab bigger jobs when you are older and have more experience. You don't want to be thought a clown, a thug, or an idiot. Electricians do a lot with computer guys, and bear in mind most of us are geeks. Further business owners did not make there money looking like a reject.

Cheers

Camain



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 07:51 AM
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I went from being a chef to a welder just about 3 years ago.

Somethings I learned over the years. The 'dirty work' will only carry you so far, learn the management side of things, costs of labor, equipment, tools, wire, etc. Try and get into that supervisor position.

Never stop learning, do as much schooling as possible. Usually if you are in a larger company or a union they will pay for additional training or schooling. It makes you more of an asset rather than just some labor to fill a position for a contract, so you'll have work all year round and not be laid off for 2 week to 2 months.

Make sure you have ALL the right tools, well obviously don't go out and spend 10 grand on tools, but just make sure you have the essentials before you start. When I started welding I had the bare minimum - tape measure, a square, screw drivers, gloves, helmet, etc. But I learned that I would literally need a tool box full of clamps, wrenches, three tape measures, the list went on, I am still collecting random tools to make my job easier.

And don't be late, or right on time for a job, always be early, something about the trades where being early is the best impression on higher up guys.



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 10:46 AM
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originally posted by: camain
a reply to: MarlinGrace

One and only one thing I would saybisbstay away from gauges in you ears, tattoos that are obvious, and sagging your pants like a damn idiot. It might not matter too much now. But you are establishing a reputation and all that crap will hinder your ability to grab bigger jobs when you are older and have more experience. You don't want to be thought a clown, a thug, or an idiot. Electricians do a lot with computer guys, and bear in mind most of us are geeks. Further business owners did not make there money looking like a reject.

Cheers

Camain


You are correct, and thats why I say learn the business end of the business. I was self employed for 30 years.



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 11:11 AM
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a reply to: lightedhype

Good for you... and you have a lot to learn... no rush in leaning this... but this gives you insight on how to get where you are--- to where I am a Master Electrician and Contractor...


CDN DORA

FYI... if this is your chosen trade... your not done with schooling...



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 12:55 PM
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a reply to: lightedhype

Get some good tools, good boots (break them in) and limit your time with folk after work. Did construction for years and I would have been better off not hanging out after work. Once they started either drinking or smoking you start finding out things about people you were better off not knowing...and always ask questions when you are on the job....

I applaud your decision to move to another field...I for one think it's a great move



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 07:34 PM
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a reply to: lightedhype

Don't suck up to your boss, but don't step on his/her toes either.

Keep a clean slate for as long as possible.

Study part time on the side.




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