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Mathematicians say it is likely alien probes have reached earth.

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posted on Aug, 21 2014 @ 09:36 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift


Remember how in Star Trek all of the various alien species had a hard time agreeing on things? Okay, so some of the aliens might have that rule, but how many? Where are all the aliens who could care less about a Prime Directive? They can't all agree on it.


I don't remember a single episode where they actually followed the prime directive. Kirk was either making out with the natives or blowing up a computer by confusing it.




posted on Aug, 22 2014 @ 05:16 AM
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a reply to: ZetaRediculian

oh like the armless alien comment? whatever dude. you think what you want it's ok don't worry about it



posted on Aug, 22 2014 @ 05:21 AM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

i'm more inclined to think there is only the one species who made us who have any consideration for us at all. the others more than likely don't have any reason to be bothered with us.



posted on Aug, 22 2014 @ 07:32 AM
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originally posted by: bottleslingguy
a reply to: ZetaRediculian

oh like the armless alien comment? whatever dude. you think what you want it's ok don't worry about it

What about it? I thought you liked it.



posted on Aug, 22 2014 @ 07:44 AM
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originally posted by: bottleslingguy
a reply to: Blue Shift

i'm more inclined to think there is only the one species who made us who have any consideration for us at all. the others more than likely don't have any reason to be bothered with us.


That's not what happened in Star Trek. What do you base this nonlinear thinking on? Maybe these aliens are more like the killer robots from the future like in Terminator. That seems more likely.



posted on Aug, 22 2014 @ 08:04 AM
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originally posted by: Ectoplasm8

originally posted by: bottleslingguy
a reply to: Ectoplasm8

how in the world can you say something is extremely rare as if we know all the examples? considering the amount of Earthlike planets out there I'd say it is highly likely there are at least several thousand distinct species of sentient beings. The universe is most likely teeming with it.

If the evolution of intelligent life was a routine process in the development of life in general, it would have arisen many more times on Earth. Earth is the perfect host, therefore the perfect example, for intelligent life to develop. Why do you suspect it only happened once in over 4 billion years? Why did it happen once in billions of life forms? Why has every other life form that has ever existed, had the sole purpose of survival and continuation of their species? There's obviously no path in nature for the evolution of high intelligence. Earth is the example of that. We're a fluke in the evolutionary process.

Even with that said, intelligent life can arise on a planet. We are the example of that possibility too. But as I've said, we are also an example of how rare that possibility is and how probable basic life will be. We're also an example of how a single species could kill off an entire planet of life. Destroying the possibility of progression to a higher intelligence. Another hurdle to get past just within the context of survival of intelligence on a planet. Not even addressing the next step of a realistic possibility of light year space travel for that species.

We still have zero absolute evidence that intelligent life has visited Earth.


Actually cetaceans and cephalopods are quite intelligent... and quite ancient. Certain birds and primates as well, not to mention ancient hominids. And my dog.

If we choose to look for intelligence "identical" to our own then we are likely to find only ourselves. How would we expect to know actual alien intelligence when we encounter it if we disregard all terrestrial intelligence but our own?



posted on Aug, 22 2014 @ 05:59 PM
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originally posted by: ZetaRediculian

originally posted by: bottleslingguy
a reply to: Blue Shift

i'm more inclined to think there is only the one species who made us who have any consideration for us at all. the others more than likely don't have any reason to be bothered with us.


That's not what happened in Star Trek. What do you base this nonlinear thinking on? Maybe these aliens are more like the killer robots from the future like in Terminator. That seems more likely.

They way they're described these days, I'd say this guy:

Is more likely to be a good example.

Harte



posted on Aug, 22 2014 @ 08:47 PM
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a reply to: draknoir2

Actually cetaceans and cephalopods are quite intelligent... and quite ancient. Certain birds and primates as well, not to mention ancient hominids. And my dog.

Yes, but they are intelligent within the realm of their world. The world of survival and propagation of their species. I actually pointed out in an older thread that cephalopods could be the perfect example of the type of species that could develop high intelligence on Earth or other planets. Intelligence doesn't have to be boxed into a human-like body.
As far as dogs, their intelligence is also driven by survival. Pleasing their owner who feeds and shelters them. Reinforcing trained behavior by being given food treats and praise, etc.


If we choose to look for intelligence "identical" to our own then we are likely to find only ourselves. How would we expect to know actual alien intelligence when we encounter it if we disregard all terrestrial intelligence but our own?

There's no identical to our own, other than a life form with the desire to search beyond their species and the ability to act on that. The point of this thread is communication by an intelligent species. Give me a highly intelligent octopus-like species from planet X visiting Earth and I'm fine with that possibility. Just give me the overwhelming scientific evidence of it.



posted on Aug, 22 2014 @ 09:23 PM
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originally posted by: Ectoplasm8
a reply to: draknoir2

Actually cetaceans and cephalopods are quite intelligent... and quite ancient. Certain birds and primates as well, not to mention ancient hominids. And my dog.

Yes, but they are intelligent within the realm of their world. The world of survival and propagation of their species. I actually pointed out in an older thread that cephalopods could be the perfect example of the type of species that could develop high intelligence on Earth or other planets. Intelligence doesn't have to be boxed into a human-like body.
As far as dogs, their intelligence is also driven by survival. Pleasing their owner who feeds and shelters them. Reinforcing trained behavior by being given food treats and praise, etc.

I wonder why you put it like that. That is, human intelligence is also "driven by survival" and propagation, so what's the difference?

Harte



posted on Aug, 23 2014 @ 02:56 AM
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originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: Ectoplasm8
a reply to: draknoir2

Actually cetaceans and cephalopods are quite intelligent... and quite ancient. Certain birds and primates as well, not to mention ancient hominids. And my dog.

Yes, but they are intelligent within the realm of their world. The world of survival and propagation of their species. I actually pointed out in an older thread that cephalopods could be the perfect example of the type of species that could develop high intelligence on Earth or other planets. Intelligence doesn't have to be boxed into a human-like body.
As far as dogs, their intelligence is also driven by survival. Pleasing their owner who feeds and shelters them. Reinforcing trained behavior by being given food treats and praise, etc.

I wonder why you put it like that. That is, human intelligence is also "driven by survival" and propagation, so what's the difference?

Harte

Yes, every life form that has ever existed has had survival-procreation as the driving force. The intent of "nature" for success. It's the desire, drive, and capability beyond that instinct of survival that is needed by a species in order to travel outside of their planet. Only humans possess those traits. Only humans actively pursue life outside of their planet.

It would take a species equal to and probably far beyond the level of human intelligence to accomplish travel to Earth. Especially a species that is repeatedly claimed to fly mechanical spacecraft that land, crash, and abduct human beings for experimentation.



posted on Aug, 23 2014 @ 10:55 AM
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originally posted by: Ectoplasm8

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: Ectoplasm8
a reply to: draknoir2

Actually cetaceans and cephalopods are quite intelligent... and quite ancient. Certain birds and primates as well, not to mention ancient hominids. And my dog.

Yes, but they are intelligent within the realm of their world. The world of survival and propagation of their species. I actually pointed out in an older thread that cephalopods could be the perfect example of the type of species that could develop high intelligence on Earth or other planets. Intelligence doesn't have to be boxed into a human-like body.
As far as dogs, their intelligence is also driven by survival. Pleasing their owner who feeds and shelters them. Reinforcing trained behavior by being given food treats and praise, etc.

I wonder why you put it like that. That is, human intelligence is also "driven by survival" and propagation, so what's the difference?

Harte

Yes, every life form that has ever existed has had survival-procreation as the driving force. The intent of "nature" for success. It's the desire, drive, and capability beyond that instinct of survival that is needed by a species in order to travel outside of their planet. Only humans possess those traits. Only humans actively pursue life outside of their planet.

It would take a species equal to and probably far beyond the level of human intelligence to accomplish travel to Earth. Especially a species that is repeatedly claimed to fly mechanical spacecraft that land, crash, and abduct human beings for experimentation.

Given that all intelligence derives through evolution from the drive to survive (which is just another way to say procreate,) is it likely that intelligence greater than human would evolve at all?

I mean, it's certainly possible that an intelligent species could make discoveries beyond what we've discovered (so far,) but that doesn't mean they have a greater intelligence per se, does it?

Harte



posted on Aug, 23 2014 @ 12:37 PM
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a reply to: smithjustinb

Birds make nests which are a lot more complicated than umbrellas, so.....



posted on Aug, 23 2014 @ 12:40 PM
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a reply to: Harte

I'm with you to a certain extent, but the problem for me is the huge distances that they would have to travel to get here. The distances are just so enormous.



posted on Aug, 23 2014 @ 12:45 PM
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a reply to: Harte

Sorry, forgot to mention the self replicating stuff, that just seems to unrealistic to me. Self fixing maybe but even that has it's limitations.



posted on Aug, 23 2014 @ 02:47 PM
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a reply to: Ectoplasm8




There's no identical to our own, other than a life form with the desire to search beyond their species and the ability to act on that. The point of this thread is communication by an intelligent species.


Protagoras stated that man is the measure of all things, that are that they are, that are not that they are not.
So sitting there staring into the sky looking for an alien intelligence that matches ones narrow definition is not likely to be very fruitful.
That's also why when alien contact does occur it can be traumatic because it is unexpected.

Dolphins have a very high intelligence for acoustic resonance and are genetically close to humans cosmically speaking.
They are very social and because of the slight differences in brain structure it would be impossible for humans to assimilate any more than a tiny fraction of dolphin intelligence. They must have an incredible ability to solve network type problems.



posted on Aug, 23 2014 @ 07:05 PM
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originally posted by: samjonesy
a reply to: Harte

I'm with you to a certain extent, but the problem for me is the huge distances that they would have to travel to get here. The distances are just so enormous.

Please don't mistake me for a believer in alien intervention. That would run almost 180 degrees counter to almost everything I've ever posted at ATS!

I'm willing to posit some sort of instantaneous space drive or whatnot. IMO, even with that it would hardly matter, as it would take a couple of thousand years to visit for five minutes only half the estimated number of stars in this galaxy even if travel between them was completely instantaneous.

Yes, the vast distances is a real drawback. But even when that drawback is ignored, the vast number of systems takes it's place as a stopping point. It's certainly possible that an alien civ could discover other intelligent species by such means, but after discovering one or two, or ten, would they actually keep looking?

I think not.

Harte



posted on Aug, 23 2014 @ 08:30 PM
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originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: Ectoplasm8

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: Ectoplasm8
a reply to: draknoir2

Actually cetaceans and cephalopods are quite intelligent... and quite ancient. Certain birds and primates as well, not to mention ancient hominids. And my dog.

Yes, but they are intelligent within the realm of their world. The world of survival and propagation of their species. I actually pointed out in an older thread that cephalopods could be the perfect example of the type of species that could develop high intelligence on Earth or other planets. Intelligence doesn't have to be boxed into a human-like body.
As far as dogs, their intelligence is also driven by survival. Pleasing their owner who feeds and shelters them. Reinforcing trained behavior by being given food treats and praise, etc.

I wonder why you put it like that. That is, human intelligence is also "driven by survival" and propagation, so what's the difference?

Harte

Yes, every life form that has ever existed has had survival-procreation as the driving force. The intent of "nature" for success. It's the desire, drive, and capability beyond that instinct of survival that is needed by a species in order to travel outside of their planet. Only humans possess those traits. Only humans actively pursue life outside of their planet.

It would take a species equal to and probably far beyond the level of human intelligence to accomplish travel to Earth. Especially a species that is repeatedly claimed to fly mechanical spacecraft that land, crash, and abduct human beings for experimentation.

Given that all intelligence derives through evolution from the drive to survive (which is just another way to say procreate,) is it likely that intelligence greater than human would evolve at all?

I mean, it's certainly possible that an intelligent species could make discoveries beyond what we've discovered (so far,) but that doesn't mean they have a greater intelligence per se, does it?

Harte

A biological species that instinctually leaves it's own planet with the ability to survive billions of miles of travel in order to seed other planets? A species only having that baseline intelligence of survival, which is propagating other planets? A life form that isn't only planet based? That's a possible theory and could be the beginning of life on Earth for all we know. I'm fine with that possibility. Just as a meteor crashing to Earth that contained the beginnings of life. It's all possible.

I'm addressing the apparent high level of intelligence it would take a species to create mechanical probes that multiply and spacecraft that visit Earth from distant planets. Anthropomorphic beings that abduct humans and perform medical experiments. A species that would get over the stumbling block of space travel. The ability to harness the energy for wormhole travel, for example. It would take a progression of steps and intelligence to accomplish this. Even if it were an easy task somehow for other beings because of the ease of harnessing enormous amounts of energy on their particular planet, it still takes the curiosity of that species to want to visit other planets. It shows a certain depth of intelligence. If not to take over Earth, there's a good possibility that it's a curiosity of other beings and communicating with those beings. That's beyond basic survival instinct and intelligence. In the context of alien piloted UFOs and aliens visiting Earth as on this forum, they would have to be fairly intelligent beings. Gazoo would be a good candidate.



posted on Aug, 23 2014 @ 09:48 PM
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originally posted by: Ectoplasm8

originally posted by: Harte


originally posted by: Ectoplasm8


originally posted by: Harte


originally posted by: Ectoplasm8

a reply to: draknoir2


Actually cetaceans and cephalopods are quite intelligent... and quite ancient. Certain birds and primates as well, not to mention ancient hominids. And my dog.


Yes, but they are intelligent within the realm of their world. The world of survival and propagation of their species. I actually pointed out in an older thread that cephalopods could be the perfect example of the type of species that could develop high intelligence on Earth or other planets. Intelligence doesn't have to be boxed into a human-like body.

As far as dogs, their intelligence is also driven by survival. Pleasing their owner who feeds and shelters them. Reinforcing trained behavior by being given food treats and praise, etc.


I wonder why you put it like that. That is, human intelligence is also "driven by survival" and propagation, so what's the difference?



Harte


Yes, every life form that has ever existed has had survival-procreation as the driving force. The intent of "nature" for success. It's the desire, drive, and capability beyond that instinct of survival that is needed by a species in order to travel outside of their planet. Only humans possess those traits. Only humans actively pursue life outside of their planet.



It would take a species equal to and probably far beyond the level of human intelligence to accomplish travel to Earth. Especially a species that is repeatedly claimed to fly mechanical spacecraft that land, crash, and abduct human beings for experimentation.


Given that all intelligence derives through evolution from the drive to survive (which is just another way to say procreate,) is it likely that intelligence greater than human would evolve at all?



I mean, it's certainly possible that an intelligent species could make discoveries beyond what we've discovered (so far,) but that doesn't mean they have a greater intelligence per se, does it?



Harte


A biological species that instinctually leaves it's own planet with the ability to survive billions of miles of travel in order to seed other planets? A species only having that baseline intelligence of survival, which is propagating other planets? A life form that isn't only planet based? That's a possible theory and could be the beginning of life on Earth for all we know. I'm fine with that possibility. Just as a meteor crashing to Earth that contained the beginnings of life. It's all possible.



I'm addressing the apparent high level of intelligence it would take a species to create mechanical probes that multiply and spacecraft that visit Earth from distant planets. Anthropomorphic beings that abduct humans and perform medical experiments. A species that would get over the stumbling block of space travel. The ability to harness the energy for wormhole travel, for example. It would take a progression of steps and intelligence to accomplish this. Even if it were an easy task somehow for other beings because of the ease of harnessing enormous amounts of energy on their particular planet, it still takes the curiosity of that species to want to visit other planets. It shows a certain depth of intelligence. If not to take over Earth, there's a good possibility that it's a curiosity of other beings and communicating with those beings. That's beyond basic survival instinct and intelligence. In the context of alien piloted UFOs and aliens visiting Earth as on this forum, they would have to be fairly intelligent beings. Gazoo would be a good candidate.


I see.

Well, I think all that is within the capabilities of human intelligence as it exists today. The only thing needed is further research, new discoveries, and some good engineering. That was my point. I was talking about intelligence, not knowledge. It's the knowledge we have yet to posess, not the intelligence.

Of course, counterexamples to this intelligence are indeed numerous here on Earth!

Harte



posted on Aug, 23 2014 @ 09:55 PM
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a reply to: Ectoplasm8

Zero absolute evidence? You are 100% wrong.



posted on Aug, 24 2014 @ 06:40 PM
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CANARD POSTS☆ ส☆ ส☆ ส☆ ส☆ ส☆ ส☆
Are we forgetting the historical and biological importance of alien probes? There exist 3 types of probes: Cultural probes, which are aliens that easily blend into human society and gather information on our lives, military probes, which infiltrate military installations and compromise our defense secrets, and anal probes, also known as biological probes, which are used to extract parts of the human body in order to perpetuate the aliens' life force, which is severely inhibited in other atmospheres. It is this lattermost probe that has been the most concerning. It seems as if human anal tissue has been a biological source of fuel for almost 2 centuries, ever since aliens arrived in the Victorian industrial era.

In fact, many of these probes are government sanctioned:
www.kenrockwell.com...

Anal probes go all the way back to the biblical tales of Sodom, who himself was a Targzissian reptilian. anal probes encourage the acceptance of sodomy, and sodomy has been an increasingly accepted practice in past decades, as evidenced by this article: www.nydailynews.com...

Now police forces are using anal probes! The media has encouraged sodomy, and sodomite practice only leads to easier ways for the aliens to administer their probes and perpetuate their life force. Rectal examinations were taboo until the 20th century, until the aliens infiltrated the military industrial complex and decided that they needed biological matter from human containers in order to survive on foreign atmospheres. in addition, it fulfills their sick inter special erotic fantasies and the aliens have been known to create hybrids in this way

The existence of these probes is evidenced by this article:

______beforeitsnews/space/2012/01/nasa-evidence-alien-spaceships-patrol-the-planets-1670675.html

This is why i implore all young people, for that is who the alien probes affect most, to wear special apparatuses in order to keep themselves safe and deter possible selection from alien anal probing: www.dhgate.com...
CANARD POSTS☆ ส☆ ส☆ ส☆ ส☆ ส☆ ส☆
edit on 24-8-2014 by lecanard because: (no reason given)

edit on 24-8-2014 by lecanard because: (no reason given)



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