Renewable Energy Success Stories!

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posted on Jul, 28 2014 @ 10:57 AM
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This is a place to post your renewable success stories. It can't be as bad as some people make out. Shoddy goods. Sloppy installation. Unexpected effects. www.dw.de... www.dw.de...

Do any of you have one of these? www.richsoil.com...
Wood is a renewable fuel.

Sorry! The air source heat pump just started up. I guess it's computer wasn't happy with the temperature of the water in the tank. I can't concentrate with all that machinery whirring away. The noise fills the whole house. I'll have to leave it at that for the time being. I'm going to work in the garden till it stops. At least it's sunny so the solar panels flown in from Singapore will save us the high cost of the electricity the heat pump consumes. Oh no! The air source heat pump fan has gone onto a higher speed! Working in the garden is going to be just as bad! At least I can be thankful that my landlord chose to take advantage of the financial incentives offered and installed green heating in our home. I'm not contributing to the fossil fuel and nuclear industries. Except when the computerised heat pump decides to heat water on an overcast day or at night when it consume large amounts of non renewable energy.

As you can see from that last paragraph I've completely fallen apart as a result of hearing all that whirring and humming. The noise of the air source heat pump has destroyed my ability to carry on with this post. Please tell us your renewable success stories.
edit on 28 7 2014 by Kester because: condense
edit on 28 7 2014 by Kester because: correction




posted on Jul, 28 2014 @ 11:03 AM
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a reply to: Kester

Not renewable energy, but this amy help you out.



posted on Jul, 28 2014 @ 11:14 AM
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Many houses in Florida use solar water heaters. They work well, even in the winter. There are a plethora of successful solar heating companies in the state. A few even produce their own power with PV panels. FPL has made it difficult to sell back excess power to the grid. An array of PV panels and a battery bank has its drawbacks, but at least it is something.

The OP mentioned wood, not really a good option for widespread use since it still will release CO2 in the atmosphere when burned. That said, a campfire or home fire is a small drip in the bucket in regards to the CO2 problem.
edit on 28-7-2014 by jrod because: c



posted on Jul, 28 2014 @ 11:16 AM
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a reply to: network dude

Thank you. It's stopped again now. We'll have to learn sign language to go along with the ear plugs. Renewables are so stimulating. www.britishsignlanguage.com...

When I heat with wood I don't need to wear hearing protection.



posted on Jul, 28 2014 @ 11:22 AM
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a reply to: Kester
I built a rocket stove from fire bricks and concrete...just a basic L shape.

Someday, I hope to build a pizza oven for it.



posted on Jul, 28 2014 @ 11:24 AM
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a reply to: jrod

As long as the wood that is cut down is replaced with new trees, wood is effectively carbon neutral.



posted on Jul, 28 2014 @ 11:33 AM
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a reply to: theantediluvian

We both that is not going to happen. We are cutting down much more than we are growing and lets not forget the fact burning wood releases CO2 in the atmosphere at a fast rate while a growing tree 'scrubs CO2 at a painfully slow rate. Using wood to produce electricity wouldn't be an eco-friendly idea.

I'll still be making campfires so I am not alarmist on the issue, just a cynic.



posted on Jul, 28 2014 @ 11:37 AM
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a reply to: jrod

Agreed. Solar panels and batteries work well for lighting etc. Our solar panels are attached to the grid and switch off in the event of a power outage. The first question I asked the installer was how do I get power during a lengthy outage. He said it can't be done, the system needs mains electric to run. All unused power is sold to the grid by our landlord. This means we have a smart meter giving off an appreciable amount of radiation.

I should get some batteries to charge but with a large family money is in short supply so it hasn't happened yet. Plus I'm the sort who almost never buys anything new and I have issues with things like new batteries that I know represent mining and manufacturing that is far from green. But you're right. Panels and batteries folks! It makes sense.

Straightforward solar water heaters are good. In Wales some friends had a shower that was just a black alkathene pipe running from the stream across a field to a hook on the wall of the barn. It warmed up enough if there was a bit of sun and the air temperature wasn't too cold. Simple and easy to maintain. All that was needed was to clear leaves away from the filter occasionally. They also had a home built wind generator and a bank of old fashioned glass batteries. It provided enough lighting for most purposes.



posted on Jul, 28 2014 @ 11:37 AM
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a reply to: loveguy

Does it work well?



posted on Jul, 28 2014 @ 11:44 AM
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a reply to: theantediluvian

Remembering that one big tree cut down needs many new trees planted if it's going to be replaced in less than say thirty years. Fencing off grazing animals allows rapid regeneration of woodland with some management, like keeping hares, rabbits and deer under control. Shhhh. Don't tell the veggies.



posted on Jul, 28 2014 @ 11:45 AM
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a reply to: Kester

How are your PV panels attached to the grid?

I am curious to what kind of tie in system you use.

One reason FPL and power companies do not like individuals 'selling' back power is often they are unable of producing a good sine wave @ 60hz in phase with the grid.

PS,

A good battery source is old cell phone tower batteries. Most cellphone towers have an emergency battery bank of AGM batteries that they replace ever couple of years, those batteries are often still in great shape and if you know a person who maintains cellphone towers, then you can often score a great deal on batteries.
edit on 28-7-2014 by jrod because: abc



posted on Jul, 28 2014 @ 12:26 PM
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a reply to: jrod

I've no idea what the technicalities are, I'm a Luddite.

Great tip. Cellphone tower batteries everyone! Just don't get caught.

I'm told golf cart batteries are a good one for the same reasons. They are often replaced when they're still in good shape. Ask your local battery supplier. Our local shop has them for £5.



posted on Jul, 28 2014 @ 12:35 PM
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a reply to: Kester

I am not saying to steal them, what kind of pirate do you think I am?

They have to be replaced after x amount of months at each tower. Those 'used' batteries can be found at a discounted price or even free. Golf cart batteries are good too, just be mindful they are usually 6 volt instead of 12V.

Wind and ocean currents are also another great renewable energy. The vertical wind turbines do not make the same amount of noise as the traditional bladed ones do, a much better alternative for making power at home.
edit on 28-7-2014 by jrod because: add



posted on Jul, 28 2014 @ 12:45 PM
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a reply to: jrod

I'm not sure there is any eco-friendly way to produce electricity. We need ElectricUniverse to guide us through harvesting natural electricity.

Burning less is the best option.



posted on Jul, 28 2014 @ 01:00 PM
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a reply to: jrod

Just a little joke.

A friend worked on a small hydro scheme that had been supplying electricity for 40 years. The water always flowed, though issues arose from time to time. The sea is reliable as a source of constant movement. Wind is inconstant in most places. There are places near here that are used by paragliders because of the predictability of a breeze. There is archaeological evidence suggesting the Romans had windmills positioned there.

We used to have plenty of these.



posted on Jul, 28 2014 @ 01:07 PM
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originally posted by: Kester
a reply to: loveguy

Does it work well?


I only fired it once to see how long it'd take to boil some water.

It took about 25 minutes.

I have a 12vdc motor/drive-wheel assembly from an old used kids atv, i hope to run an automotive alternator with. It's got an over-sized drive-pulley bolted on, and a pwm i bought from the web.

plus, i'm working on a miniature r/c motor with a diode and fanblade atop my jeep to charge the battery i use for my audio amp; i don't want to drill any holes in the firewall...still in the design stages.

i used to dink around with earth batteries, there are easier ways to collect energy nowadays though.

we'd think these hybrid electrics manufacturers would think to utilize a simple wind generator in front of the grill so as to at least maintain a trickle charge...

crum,
i have to hit the road.
hagda



posted on Jul, 28 2014 @ 02:16 PM
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Selling juice back to the company at first was frowned on because of the non uniform feeds but now nearly every converter you buy has sine wave macthed functions. That is no longer a problem. It only takes a quick inspection to verify. However most companies will charge you a monthly fee to feed back. Small producers are really frowned on and not wanted by policies that limit ability to produce. Even once you get going they will only match your bill then give you the same price that they buy in bulk. Some changes could be made to make it more attainable. For one baseing it on a year instead of a month let wind energy providers reap the true benefits of their systems. There are peak months that can offset the rest of the years use but at bulk rates you are still payingfor the off season. With todays tech a true two way meter could automatically reject juice not up to code with no visit from anyone. Accounts could be viewed in a different manner to provide incentive for small producers.



posted on Jul, 28 2014 @ 04:51 PM
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a reply to: Kester

I have a wood burning fire. Has a wetback. I love it. Heats the house , heats the water, can cook on it and drys the clothes all at the same time. My power bill goes down during winter. I get tree rings from the logging company's and spilt it myself. Bit of lab our but worth it.
Here in nz the logging companies have to replant whatever they cut down.
edit on 28-7-2014 by ZeussusZ because: (no reason given)
edit on 28-7-2014 by ZeussusZ because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 02:35 AM
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a reply to: ZeussusZ

Splitting logs can be healthy exercise. Not that manual workers need any more exercise, but for the non-manual workers it's an added benefit. There's a saying firewood heats you twice. When you cut it and when you burn it.

I once left my splitting maul in the garden of a doctor who I was removing a tree for. He's the kind of person who thinks anything a manual labourer does must be easy. He tried to split a couple of logs. When I arrived for work I found the handle of the maul damaged and the doctor in bed with a painful back injury. I don't leave tools lying around now.

For the sake of those without log splitting experience I'll post these two videos. I was lucky enough to be taught log splitting by an experienced forester. That bit of instruction made my life a lot easier.




I was in the local hospital a few years ago when a man wearing heavy boots walked in slowly, went up to the desk and said in a strained voice, "I hit my foot with an axe." "Is there any blood?" asked the nurse. "I don't know." said the man, "I haven't looked". Judging by the way he was walking I expect there was some bone damage.
No comment.

edit on 29 7 2014 by Kester because: addition.

Another safety point. A friend cutting sticks had the end of one fly up and burst her eyeball. Any readers who are new to this should take extra care.
edit on 29 7 2014 by Kester because: added safety warning
edit on 29 7 2014 by Kester because: addition





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