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Happy WW1 Centennial Everybody! *with cool videos*

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posted on Jul, 28 2014 @ 10:54 AM
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I think that WW1 is the most vastly underestimated/underrepresented war that ever happened in the world and caused so many widespread effects that continue to this day. Almost EVERWHERE, my America along with the entire North American, European, Asian and African -Scratch that - Every country in every continent except Antarctica has been affected by the First World War.

First let me enlighten you guys with the Russo-Japanese War which was the first modern and industrialized war which was scrutinized by observers from ALL western countries on both sides. The entire western world was shocked when they saw Japan come out the victor. EVERYTHING that was in WW1, dreadnaughts, machine guns, submarines, etc... everything except airplanes since they were only 2 years old by then. After the war my favorite president U.S. President Teddy Roosevelt actually mediated the ceasefire. Just so you guys can get the picture of it what it looked like, this is from an awesome documentary narrated by Ken Watanabe called Saka no ue no Komo:



After this we had the 2 Balkan Wars which were mostly Balkan states trying to stop the spread of the Ottoman Empire which was the Prelude to WW1, essentially you can say that WW1 was a continuation of the Balkan Wars, or a 3rd Balkan war; and more likely would have been labeled that if Western Europe's web of treaties, alliances, new weapons and resources of war begging to be tested, along with the bonds of Royalty (The German Kaiser, Russian Tsar, and British King were cousins) wouldn't have expedited the entrance into the Great War. But first of all some background on the Balkan Wars:

First a Historical Video, and if you want to see something less boring for you a second video:


This second video is to show you an historical representation of the war so you may see how similar it is to WW1:


Now back to the First World War, I've been pretty disgusted about the LOADS of WW2 movies, video games, and media in general, but finally/hopefully there's been an increase in interest matched up with this topic because of the centennial and hopefully the realization of the two wars links. And when I say TWO wars I really mean ONE. World War 1 and 2 were basically the same war with a truce for less than 2 decades. World War 2 was a continuation of World War 1 because the reasons for fighting were based on many concepts.

1. This foreshadowing quote was when Pershing commented on the subject of armistice during WW1 "If we do not continue to push the Germans back all the way to Berlin, then they'll never think they were actually beaten, and we will eventually have to face them again."
2. Since the German soldier never thought he was actually beat in the field he thought that he was cheated and certain elements stabbed them in the back, causing them great strife.
3. The harsh penalties put on Germans through the Versailles treaty.
4. The victorious allies complete disregard and disrespect for their ALLY Japan during Versailles negotiations.
5. The complete breakdown and dismantling of old countries into new and sometimes never previously existing states (Poland, and Czechoslovakia.
6. German animosity towards France ever since they won the Franco-Prussian war which united Germany into the country it is, why they didn't keep Paris, and France I'll never know.
7. I could go on and on, including other negative/positive facts such as the League of Nations (The Prelude to the UN).


Now back to the original comments/questions I wanted to discuss about WW1. The First World War did not invent (as some are mistaken), but accepted and improved for use in war:
Airplanes (Although the first use of aircraft in war was used by the Italians to drop bombs over the Greeks in 1911)
Submarines (Were used in Port Arthur during Russo-Japanese War)
Zeppelins (First use of long range strategic bombing, and first British Air-Raid)
Machine Guns (Improvements would lead to sub-machine guns etc and light machine guns)

Besides this there were many other improvements but alas time is short and I must go, if I can come back soon I'll post more on everything I wanted to cover. I feel this to be a very important subject, and not because I'm part Austrian! I'll share one quick story about my step-father's grandpa before I leave. He served in the US Army on the Western Front and was hit by mustard gas I believe, even though he survived his lungs were never the same afterwards as he had pulmonary issues up until he died. I feel that this war isn't covered enough and was perhaps even more atrocious, and important, then the second, casualties and everything (60,000 British casualties in 1 day, the most every suffered during battle). I would like to hear your thoughts, experiences, and stories on the matter!
edit on 28-7-2014 by Swing80s because: text error




posted on Jul, 28 2014 @ 11:46 AM
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originally posted by: Swing80s

Submarines (Were used in Port Arthur during Russo-Japanese War)



I don't get the attempt at humour in your title and didn't read much of your typing, but the glaring error in your history of submarine warfare warrants comment.

Submarines were used in the American Civil War prior to the Russo-Japanese conflict.

Nothing else to add to this ill-conceived thread.



posted on Jul, 28 2014 @ 12:12 PM
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originally posted by: Psynic

originally posted by: Swing80s

Submarines (Were used in Port Arthur during Russo-Japanese War)



I don't get the attempt at humour in your title and didn't read much of your typing, but the glaring error in your history of submarine warfare warrants comment.

Submarines were used in the American Civil War prior to the Russo-Japanese conflict.

Nothing else to add to this ill-conceived thread.


The OP merely mentioned they had been used prior to WWI and cited an example.... I see no problem.

Your comment was wholly inappropriate and demeaning to an otherwise informative thread.

Thanks for the videos OP, I enjoyed them.


(post by Swing80s removed for a manners violation)

posted on Jul, 28 2014 @ 05:59 PM
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a reply to: Swing80s

I just sure hope the centennial of WW I will not become the year of WW III.



posted on Jul, 28 2014 @ 06:09 PM
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Couldn't edit my post, first offensive use of airplanes was in 1911 by the Italians against Libya I believe but I won't wiki it



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 02:07 PM
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a reply to: Swing80s

Good thread!

Two tiny minor gripes though. One was with the title of the thread as it says "happy" centennial as if it's something to celebrate. I would say we should commemorate but not celebrate.




Airplanes (Although the first use of aircraft in war was used by the Italians to drop bombs over the Greeks in 1911)


Minor little thing here and I don't mean to be nit pick, but I thought it was Libyans not Greeks. Or rather Libya as a region of the Ottoman Empire.


That doesn't detract from a very interesting and thoughtful thread though. It is sometimes overlooked by The Second World War, but that war cannot be fully understood without understanding the first.

I think it was George Kennan who after the collapse of the Soviet Union, reflected back on the events of the 20th Century and said that the First World War was the beginning of everything and that every major world political issue/crisis/war up to that time could be traced back to that war and it's consequences.

This coming Monday, August 4th marks the 100th anniversary of Britain's entry into the war. People are being asked to switch off their lights between 10:00pm and 11:00pm to commemorate and also in reference to the UK Foreign Secretary, Edward Grey's words at the time:

"The lamps are going out all over Europe. We shall not see them lit again in our lifetimes."

There's hardly a family in the UK that didn't have a relative who fought or was involved in some way. Mine fought at the Somme and was shot by a machine gun (he survived). I have his diary.

There are an overwhelming number of Second World War films, but very few First World War films (that I'm aware of). I've seen a fairly decent Canadian one called Passchendaele and there is also one called Joyeux Noel (about the Christmas truce of 1914 between British and German soldiers).



posted on Jul, 30 2014 @ 02:33 PM
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a reply to: Swing80s

Do you know what the Russo-Japanese war video is from? Which movie or TV series? Looks very impressive.

European militaries drew the wrong conclusions from that war. They mistakenly believed that the Japanese victory showed that with sheer will power, belief and true leadership machine gun emplacements and entrenchments could stil be overcome.

The American Civil War and also before it the Crimean War to a certain extent showed the beginnings of modern industrial warfare. The American Civil War was treated somewhat contemptuously by the Generals of Europe. Many didn't really view it as a "real" war and that it was more akin to a rabble running around with pitchforks etc.



posted on Jul, 31 2014 @ 12:15 PM
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Happy Anniversary of the World Trade Centre Attack everybody!
Here are some real cool pictures of bodies falling from the building!!!


Same thing.



posted on Jul, 31 2014 @ 12:38 PM
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The first world war was the French-Indian war (or the seven years war in Europe). It was literally fought all over the world. WWI is a misnomer.
edit on 31-7-2014 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 31 2014 @ 12:52 PM
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Thanks for education us about the Russo-Japanese war, which seems to have been forgotten. Glad Teddy Roosevelt was around to speak softly and wield that big stick of his. Interesting topic, and I'll bookmark this to watch the vids later.
edit on 31-7-2014 by Aleister because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 31 2014 @ 12:53 PM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
The first world war was the French-Indian war (or the 100 years war in Europe). It was literally fought all over the world. WWI is a misnomer.


Can you explain more. Why was it a continuation of the French-Indian war, you mean the one in the States?



posted on Jul, 31 2014 @ 01:10 PM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t




The first world war was the French-Indian war (or the 100 years war in Europe).


Correction - The French and Indian War is also known as The Seven Years War, not The Hundred Years War.

The Hundred Years War was 1300s-1400s.



posted on Jul, 31 2014 @ 01:13 PM
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a reply to: Aleister




Can you explain more. Why was it a continuation of the French-Indian war, you mean the one in the States?


The Seven Years was fought around in different areas of the globe (America, India, Europe etc), so could arguably be seen as the first "world" war.



posted on Jul, 31 2014 @ 01:56 PM
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originally posted by: Kram09
a reply to: Krazysh0t




The first world war was the French-Indian war (or the 100 years war in Europe).


Correction - The French and Indian War is also known as The Seven Years War, not The Hundred Years War.

The Hundred Years War was 1300s-1400s.


You're right. I got my numbers mixed up. I'll edit my post.



posted on Jul, 31 2014 @ 01:58 PM
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originally posted by: Aleister

originally posted by: Krazysh0t
The first world war was the French-Indian war (or the 100 years war in Europe). It was literally fought all over the world. WWI is a misnomer.


Can you explain more. Why was it a continuation of the French-Indian war, you mean the one in the States?


Sorry I mistyped. I meant the seven years war.

Seven Years' War


The Seven Years' War was a war that took place between 1754 and 1763 with the main conflict being in the seven-year period 1756–1763. It involved most of the great powers of the time and affected Europe, North America, Central America, the West African coast, India, and the Philippines. In the historiography of some countries, the war is alternatively named after combatants in the respective theatres: the French and Indian War as it is known in the United States or the War of the Conquest as it is known in French-speaking Canada, while it is called the Seven Years' War in English-speaking Canada (North America, 1754–63); Pomeranian War (with Sweden and Prussia, 1757–62); Third Carnatic War (on the Indian subcontinent, 1757–63); and Third Silesian War (with Prussia and Austria, 1756–63).


As can be seen it was fought on just about every continent.






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