It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

How many Russian nukes are Accounted For?

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Dec, 3 2004 @ 06:39 AM
link   
I was thinking a little bit about the vast number of nukes that russia and united states have, and i have a few questions for all you experts.

1. Can Russia Account For All Of Its Nukes?
2. If so how reliable do YOU view the information
3. Does russia still produce nuclear bombs (or have any suspeciouse activity?)
4. If so at what rate is russias nuclear manurfacturing rising at?

The reason i am asking these questions is becouse i could see (despite their diffrences) the next world wars Axis Of Evil Consisting of Russia,China,North Korea, all 3 countrys are extremly powerful.




posted on Dec, 3 2004 @ 07:02 AM
link   

Originally posted by zi2525
I was thinking a little bit about the vast number of nukes that russia and united states have, and i have a few questions for all you experts.

1. Can Russia Account For All Of Its Nukes?
2. If so how reliable do YOU view the information
3. Does russia still produce nuclear bombs (or have any suspeciouse activity?)
4. If so at what rate is russias nuclear manurfacturing rising at?

The reason i am asking these questions is becouse i could see (despite their diffrences) the next world wars Axis Of Evil Consisting of Russia,China,North Korea, all 3 countrys are extremly powerful.


Here are some links
www.worldnetdaily.com...

www.acronym.org.uk...



posted on Dec, 3 2004 @ 07:42 AM
link   



The reason i am asking these questions is becouse i could see (despite their diffrences) the next world wars Axis Of Evil Consisting of Russia,China,North Korea, all 3 countrys are extremly powerful.


Thats is a very broad ranging assumption - and i`m sure that people in the countries you have mentioned could easily see `others` in an `axis of evil`.

The same could be asked of missing nukes from the usa - there are quite a few.



posted on Dec, 3 2004 @ 07:53 AM
link   
Actually, I believe the US has only 11 "broken arrows" whereas Russia is believed to have about 3 times as many...



posted on Dec, 3 2004 @ 03:31 PM
link   
Their won't be another "real" world war, as in soldiers fighting much, it'll all be nukes, robots (Talon/Drones etc...) and maybe the odd battle between soldiers to take countires etc...

If a nuclear war does happen (it will sometime) then people will:
Get guns, bombs, ammo & supplies
Barracade themselves in houses/cellars/buildings/bunkers
Wait for enemy soldiers/robots and fight or hide

[edit on 3-12-2004 by Nexus]



posted on Dec, 5 2004 @ 02:46 PM
link   
Other than suitcase nukes, buying a nuke would be about the worst way to go about terorrism. For that you buy nuclear waste or processed plutonium and set up a lab in a 3rd world country, build 10 or more bombs, abandon the lab, disperse for 5 or so years and show back up with the back trail conveniently dead. Insert operatives and the devices in the country you are angry at and then boom!!

If you are wondering about countrys like IRan and such having nuclear warheads bought from the russians or satellite republics etc and slapped on homebrew missiles or bought missiles. You should be. It has happened it will happen more and we can't stop it just make it harder. Iran probably has a couple warheads somewhere.
As for the US' missing birds at least 5 went to Israel, one or two possibly went to Iraq which is why our troops were genuinelly surprised not to find any wmd, we gave them boatloads in the early 80's.



posted on Dec, 17 2008 @ 06:44 PM
link   
s h i t man, Russia isn't evil! I lived in Russia and Ukraine about half my life and they are just as human as Americans. They don't got no horns and tails or nothing like that! The next world war is Russia with America versus ARABS!!! Kick their A S S E S!



posted on May, 27 2009 @ 12:10 AM
link   
Or they could just recover one of the 11 U.S. nuclear weapons lost around the globe that have yet to be recovered.. Maybe even one of Russia's infamous lost nukes. Most of them are in the ocean somewhere. If the Kursk nuclear submarine could be salvaged, there's probably like a dozen nukes right there..

www.didyouknow.org...

There are 92 known cases of nuclear bombs lost at sea.
(of coarse, this is not exactly true.. Of these 92, many of them have been recovered. But not all)

usgovinfo.about.com...

While the facts concerning the existence or non-existence of nuclear weapons aboard the Kursk may never be confirmed, several lost nuclear warheads already litter the world's oceans. Joshua Handler, past research coordinator of Greenpeace, estimates that since 1945, 50 nuclear weapons have been lost and remain lost at sea. The U.S. alone officially lists 11 nuclear bombs lost and never recovered in accidents. (See: Nuclear Spring, from you About Guide.)

Understandably, governments of nations having nuclear weapons are reluctant to give out exact information about their whereabouts. The U.S. Department of Defense's official answer to questions about the location of nuclear weapons is, "It is U.S. policy neither to confirm nor deny the presence or absence of nuclear weapons at any specific location."


www.ibiblio.org...

On Tuesday, 24 January 1961, at about 12:30 a.m., two hydrogen bombs fell to earth near the tiny farming village of Faro, NC.

Obviously, neither bomb yielded its awful potential, or the world would today be mourning an infamous catastrophe. The two model MARK 39 devices came down when the B-52 bomber in which they were riding suffered structural failure and disintegrated in mid-air 12 miles north of Seymour Johnson Air Force Base in Goldsboro, NC. The plane exploded as it fell. Five crewmen parachuted to earth safely. Three died -- two who went down with the doomed bomber, and one who was found two miles from the crash site hanging by his parachute in a tree, his neck broken. The H-bombs jettisoned as the plane descended, one bomb parachuting to earth intact, the other striking a farmer's field at high speed -- "probably mach 1" (about 760 miles per hour) speculates one retired Air Force Colonel.

Safety mechanisms designed to prevent unintended or unauthorized detonation served their function, and a historic nuclear catastrophe was averted. But published sources disagree on how close the people of Wayne County came to suffering fiery annihilation. There is also disagreement in print on the potential yield of the weapons.

An on-going environmental concern centers on the portion or portions of one bomb still buried, sunk in a boggy farm field. Quicksand-like conditions made deep excavation impossible where the free-falling bomb came down, and that bomb was never recovered in full. The state of North Carolina still conducts periodic radiation testing on local ground water.


www.counterpunch.org...

On February 3, 1991, this particular B-52G had been deployed to circle around Baghdad. It was armed with 3 SRAM missiles armed with nuclear warheads and fitted with rocket drives to push them 100 miles to the rear of the B-52 before detonating.

The B-52 was heading off to refuel when it developed very serious electrical problems, including the loss of navigational equipment.

Hoping to limp back to base on the island of Diego Garcia in the Indian Ocean, the crew were heading the plane south just off the coast of Somalia when fires in five of the engines threatened to detonate the heat sensitive fuse mechanisms of the SRAMS. Thinking they would plummet into deep water the crew dumped the nuclear bombs, and the B-52 crashed not long thereafter. Some members of the crew died, others survived and were picked up.

But, our informant tells us, the warheads in fact landed in shallow water, on Somalia's continental shelf. Three months later, in mid-May of 1991, they were allegedly retrieved and passed into the hands of an arms dealer involved in other covert transactions in Somalia at the time.

The dimension of each warhead was 30" x 18" x 18", weighing 560 pounds. Because of sea-water contamination only the weapons grade uranium would be usable, either in a "dirty" bomb, or as the warhead for a new missile.

As the three warheads entered international arms-smuggling loops, the Bush-One and subsequently Clinton administrations dispatched various covert units to recover them, with no success.


www.brookings.edu...

44. Number of U.S. nuclear bombs lost in accidents and never recovered: 11

U.S. Department of Defense; Center for Defense Information; Greenpeace; "Lost Bombs," Atwood-Keeney Productions, Inc., 1997


-ChriS

[edit on 27-5-2009 by BlasteR]



posted on May, 27 2009 @ 12:25 AM
link   

Originally posted by BlasteR

If the Kursk nuclear submarine could be salvaged, there's probably like a dozen nukes right there.

Kursk has already been salvaged



From this thread

 


Regarding other nukes, take a look at first minute or so of this video. Do you believe him? Alexander Lebed...


Posted here.



posted on May, 27 2009 @ 01:21 AM
link   
reply to post by Hellmutt
 


Thought-provoking and shocking. It's a wonder we haven't been nuked already. All this makes you wonder where these nukes really are if they've been forgotten somewhere at sea.

Then we have a military that hasn't exactly gotten alot of good press with relation to recent nuclear weapons incidents.

ATS Premium: Barksdale Missile Number Six: The Stolen Nuclear Weapon

6 Nukes were never missing,They are heading to IRAN.

Just last year, we had a B-52 flying at least 6 live nuclear weapons over American soil when they weren't supposed to. How are we supposed to maintain any useful accountability of our nuclear assets if we're losing track of just 1? Then it becomes known that nuclear components were accidentally sent to China a few years ago with a shipment of supplies from the U.S.. Of coarse, none of these components were explosive or nuclear. But what really gets public media attention and what doesn't? How much are we really being told? ALL valid and very thought-provoking questions.

Then we have a huge number of nuke-related accidents that get swept under the rug and become lost to history. Most of them are just forgotten altogether. Even when the accidents aren't covered up. I worked in munitions for the USAF for over 6 years. I never worked with nukes, myself. I only dealt with conventional munitions like missiles, bombs, ammunition, and explosive charges. But I was stationed at Little Rock AFB for nearly 2 years. I worked in a munitions storage area that had been the scene of a pretty horrific nuclear accident in the eighties related to an ICBM in the silo that exploded.

It turns out that liquid fuel was leaking from the missile. A spark from somewhere detonated the fumes, then the exposed fuel, then the propellant in the missile itself. I know it killed a couple people, at least, because I saw a special on the incident on the military channel in 2005. But the point is this.. I worked every day in the very same area as this incident for 2 years without ever knowing of the incident. When I was stationed there, there was an old nuclear silo that had been filled with concrete and covered over. But we were never told what had really happened.

If they aren't even willing to tell their own people.. I think you get the idea. Granted, it was public knowledge what had happened. But it was like the entire incident was just forgotten to history.. And I'm not even sure my supervisors even knew what had happened.

And then there are instances like this where the military just blatantly removes all records of the incident completely.. If the public doesn't know what really happened, how often does THIS really happen without anyone ever knowing about it?
Air Force Omits Nuke Error From 2007 Incidents List

In the sixties and seventies the Army was experimenting with nuclear reactor technology for powering an entire base. They built one and tested it for a few years up here in Alaska at Fort Greely. The reactor went critical 2 times that are publicly known.. At least 2 other times that have been covered up completely even though people have later come forward to talk about these incidents. Noone knows how radiated the site is today.. What we do know is that radioactive nuclear waste was literally dumped into the River adjacent to the base. And we don't know how much was dumped. All we know is that the river is, to this day, a radiological catastrophe. Fort Greely was also one of the only military facilities used for open-air testing of biological and chemical agents (Primarily, VX nerve agent). And there are locations all over the base that are still contaminated with unknown amounts of chemical agent because of mishandling and negligence that have taken place over the decades.

Who knows what's really happened that we haven't heard about.
Especially UFO-related incidents involving nuclear weapons (which has occurred all over the world and is pretty well documented)
Here's one related ATS thread well-worthy of mention here:

CNN: Video of UFO craft destroying missile nuke flying through the sky!


-ChriS



new topics

top topics



 
0

log in

join