It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

World's largest flying aquatic insect found, and it's nasty lookin'

page: 2
29
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jul, 24 2014 @ 04:52 AM
link   

originally posted by: Snarl

originally posted by: smithjustinb

originally posted by: Kangaruex4Ewe
I bet if it flew into one of those bug zappers it would kick the breaker...


lol

2nd

Did you beat me to it? I was about to suggest this bugger is another reason to back the 2d.


When someone says something funny, and you don't have anything to say about the topic, they deserve the recognition of a simple "lol".




posted on Jul, 24 2014 @ 05:41 AM
link   
This scene from 'Caveman,' one of my favorite films when I was a kid, comes to mind.



posted on Jul, 24 2014 @ 05:56 AM
link   
Introducing the all new Thor Bug Zapper, show these other worldly looking beasts the might of the Thunder Bug Zapping Gods.






posted on Jul, 24 2014 @ 07:30 AM
link   
a reply to: proob4

Really? Really?

You had to say we have them here?
Thanks for the nightmares. LOL

Those things look nasty.



posted on Jul, 24 2014 @ 09:44 AM
link   
a reply to: canucks555

Awwww... cute 'lil feller.

We got sewer roaches here in AZ that could step on that guy and not notice...



posted on Jul, 24 2014 @ 09:53 AM
link   
Where I grew up in central texas, my family has used the larva of these for over a hundred years as catfish bait. We call them hellgrammites. They live in swift moving shallow rapids. You flip rocks and set up netting downstream to catch them. They never swarm. They are solitary creatures when in adulthood. I feel bad for them. They are like moths, and would always die when they get too close to the campfire. The larva has a hell of a bite, but never been bothered by them once they get their wings.

Boba



posted on Jul, 24 2014 @ 10:03 AM
link   
I've had bugs in my eyes and teeth (the joys of a motorcycle)
even had a bee in my helmet, that looks like it cause whip-lash

ewww



posted on Jul, 24 2014 @ 10:54 AM
link   
Yep we have in Michigan, especially around the inlets around the Great Lakes.

The like to land on boats and for some strange reason on the tip-tops of fishing poles.

Not sure if I've seen them as large as the OP's pic though.

edit on 24-7-2014 by Realtruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 24 2014 @ 11:17 AM
link   
Yikes, that looks like it should have been extinct for a billion years already! I wonder how loud they are in flight.



posted on Jul, 24 2014 @ 11:48 AM
link   

originally posted by: awakendhybrid
Yikes, that looks like it should have been extinct for a billion years already! I wonder how loud they are in flight.


The ones I have heard sound like a hummingbird.

I think the sound and the site of one will startle most.



posted on Jul, 24 2014 @ 01:58 PM
link   
Now that is a big one. Dobsonfly larvae make great fishing bait. We call them grampus down here in S.E. Ky. The adult males usually have the biggest jaws and are nearly unable to even bite as a result, it's the females and larvae that can really put a hurtin on ya.



posted on Jul, 24 2014 @ 02:13 PM
link   
Oh funny, this is what we call a hilgamite in Missouri, and yes they are that big, masses of them linger around the gasconade river on a regular basis, although I will have to say that's the only river I have seen them in
a reply to: canucks555



posted on Jul, 24 2014 @ 02:51 PM
link   
I think Australia's getting challenged in the "damn nature you scary" competition


Also, PUT THAT THING BACK WHERE IT CAME FROM OR SO HELP ME...



posted on Jul, 24 2014 @ 02:57 PM
link   
The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

Dragonfly/dobsonfly two very different things. It's the dragonfly you'll normally see flitting around a fishing boat or landing on the tip of your fishing rod. They're harmless to humans and in fact eat mosquito larvae, so they're 'good bugs'. Please don't hurt the dragonflies.

The dobsonfly is the really scary one, and is also primarily nocturnal. The males have the nastier looking pincers, but they're so long they can't get any real leverage with them, so can't inflict any damage to humans. The females are less menacing looking but can bite the hell out of you.

The larval stage hellgrammite is probably the best smallmouth bass bait you can use. But oh yes they pinch. Hook one through the collar on a light wire hook and drift them around submerged rocks in a smallmouth creek or river and hang on, the smallmouth will slam them hard.

Freshwater fishing. I do love it so.


As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Jul, 24 2014 @ 04:13 PM
link   

originally posted by: TheToastmanCometh
I think Australia's getting challenged in the "damn nature you scary" competition


Also, PUT THAT THING BACK WHERE IT CAME FROM OR SO HELP ME...


lol, Monsters Inc. quote..love it.

Used to catch the hellgrammites that everyone is referring to also. In West Virginia. Good bait. Nasty looking things.
Just not that big!



posted on Jul, 24 2014 @ 07:24 PM
link   


kill it with fire.



posted on Jul, 24 2014 @ 07:42 PM
link   
a reply to: chiefsmom

If you get a chance to see this amazing creature then treasure it. It's a once in a lifetime occurrence at best.



posted on Jul, 24 2014 @ 07:48 PM
link   
a reply to: Realtruth Yea it was the size for me too. I say shannaggins on the size.



posted on Jul, 25 2014 @ 12:09 AM
link   
Someone needs a bigger bug zapper!



posted on Jul, 27 2014 @ 11:12 PM
link   
Mothra lives!




new topics

top topics



 
29
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join