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Arg! "Good Intentions" in children's television programing backfires!

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posted on Jul, 20 2014 @ 08:24 PM
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originally posted by: LadySkadi
I'm just going to say it - no reason for a 4 year old to be watching tv.

And no reason not to either.

I wouldn't leave a child of that age to watch TV on their own, but I see nothing wrong with children watching small amounts of television with their parents, and, most importantly, talking about what they are watching.

It's the mindless electronic-babysitter syndrome, where parents ignore the child and let them watch any old rubbish, that is harmful.




posted on Jul, 20 2014 @ 08:43 PM
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a reply to: Cuervo

It's funny that we teach kids to see each other as different (unique), and then in the same breath, try to instill that everyone is equal. Small children don't understand the mixed message, and I'm not sure most adults do either.

TV for kids is largely horrible. Don't expect TV to teach your kid anything worth knowing. Indoctrination is the main objective, always keep that in mind.



posted on Jul, 21 2014 @ 04:35 AM
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I suggest you do the same. Get Well Soon is hosted by a white coated individual. Not individuals. The other one is a nurse. In a nurse uniform. No white coat. And doctors do make you better, regardless of whatever conspiracy you choose to immerse yourself in. As for Nina and the neurons. No your joke wasn't amusing, it was childish. It's aimed at toddlers. That entire channel is aimed at 1-4 years old. What on earth do you think the show is being used for? Seriously? I would love to know. Because I watch them regularly with my son as I like him to learn as much as he can. I sit and watch with him so he can ask me questions if he needs to. There is nothing wrong with these programs other than your obsessive desire to see conspiracy where there is none. This is why conspiracy theorists aren't taken seriously.
a reply to: VoidHawk



posted on Jul, 21 2014 @ 05:36 AM
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originally posted by: misnomer68
a reply to: Cuervo

It's funny that we teach kids to see each other as different (unique), and then in the same breath, try to instill that everyone is equal. Small children don't understand the mixed message, and I'm not sure most adults do either.

What is a mixed message about "different but equal"? A two-year-old can name and identify lots of different shapes and understand that a circle is different from a square is different from a triangle. But they are all shapes and none of them is intrinsically better than the other.



posted on Jul, 21 2014 @ 06:05 AM
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a reply to: VegHead

It is a difficult problem to address is it not?

I think however, that realistically speaking there IS still a widely held belief amongst some hardcore misogynistic halfwits, that women cannot do science. I am a fan of a particular channel on Youtube which features a young lady who works in one of the larger museums in the U.S.A., and she has had all manner of terrible comments on her channel content, specifically aimed at her gender. From suggesting that her message might be better received if she wore more appealing clothing, to suggestions that the lead presenter of the show should be a man to give the channel more legitimacy, the comments received prove that there is still plenty of sexism out there.

So, with this in mind, it would be unfortunate if a child were to aim high, only to have their knees cut out from under them by an unforeseen derision based on gender. It should not exist in this, allegedly enlightened age, but it does, and the real issue here, therefore, is how to combat that, how to inform your child that these views exist, but are total and utter bunkum, and help them retain their fascination with the world and its many facets, their determination to be a part of the teams of people who investigate its many facets, the better to affect positive outcomes for our future as a species.

Anyone of intellect knows that there have been many famous women scientists, ranging from doctors in medicine, to astronomers. Balls to those who say otherwise!



posted on Jul, 22 2014 @ 12:19 AM
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a reply to: Rob48
Maybe I worded it wrong, but what I was trying to convey is that we have taught our kids that they are all "unique and special" to the point of creating a nation of self-entitled narcissists. We've told our kids they are great, or awesome with every step they take!

We must remember to praise a child's efforts, not the ability. ie. " You played soccer so well today, you must have practiced alot", as opposed to "you are the best soccer player!"



posted on Jul, 22 2014 @ 01:54 AM
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a reply to: misnomer68
Oh yeah, special snowflake syndrome. I quite agree. Parents tend to be more to blame for that than TV, though. "He's not disruptive, he just learns differently!"



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