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Who wrote the Torah?

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posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 09:50 AM
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originally posted by: undo
here ya go. click the little strongs numbers after the words

I am that I am


I kinda like the interinear function of biblehub.com

==> biblehub.com... (notice the verse number for this, 3:14)

And I also own a quite good interlinear bible on paper and a quite good version of Strong's. In a week or so I get four new biblical lexicons, and there is one in particular I look forward too with excitement "The Analytical Hebrew and Chaldee Lexicon" by Benjamin Davidson. Also, a copy of BDB (the "standard" bib. Heb. lexicon), and Thayer (the "standard" bib. Gr. lexicon) and "A Concise Hebrew and Aramaic Lexicon of the Old Testament" by Holladay. I also own Bagster's "The Analytical Greek Lexicon to the New Testament" with grammar analysis and defs.

All great books and essential resources for anyone trying to squeeze some sense out of the Bible. There are great resources on the web, but developing your own library is a joyful experience. Pure bliss




posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 07:03 PM
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a reply to: Utnapisjtim

well, i won't argue, eh-yeh = ea. the E in EA is pronounced A as in Ace (eh) and the A is pronounced Ah as in At (Ayah).
hehe. and ayah + semitic H prefix is Hayah, who is Ehyeh, who is Ea who is Enki.




posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 07:08 PM
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oh and yahweh = (w) eh - yah = ayah = ea, add semitic prefix = hayah and of course, ehyeh.

wheee



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 09:17 PM
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Haven't really looked deeply into the most recent posts to see if I have anything to contribute yet. But, let me just let you all know about a program that will meet all of the needs you guys are looking for. You guys will really like this program, great for studying the bible, particularly in this way. Called e-sword

www.e-sword.net...

Built in with strong's concordance to see the translation of any word in scripture. Can download all sorts of alternate translations, commentaries. Can download the original Hebrew/greek. Great tool.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 06:23 AM
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a reply to: undo

I'm sorry I don't share your excitement on this, to me the Biblical God is a composite of a bunch of earlier gods and goddesses. There is a close link between these gods and language. One good example is Yamm, the seven headed dragon, who was a son of El. Yamm was the god of the waters, the seas and rivers. The word for sea in Hebrew is the Chaldean word Yam. Another word is Heb. אור or Ur which means Light. Ur became the name of the Chaldean city where Abraham came from, what some say is the oldest city in history, dating perhaps as far back to 6500 BC. One of God's arch angels is Uriel, "El's Light". We find this word in many Germanic words, like the German word for clock, Uhr, or the norwegian prefix ur- as in 'urtid' ur- + time, the ancient times. Similarly I trace the Norwegian word for fire, Ild or Eld, to Heb. El, in the sense 'the fiery one', but also the origin of the word Old. El- and eld- is also used in much the same way as ur- in Norwegian, as in Eld-gammel (eld-old) and also No. Eldre or Elder in English.

Back when the languages were formed, the words became gods, much like how John 1 shows, "In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God and the Word was a god". This part is not really about Jesus, but a description of how language and religion were once formed, it's a linguistic creation story. In Hebrew, this word is often mistaken for the Name of God, יהוה. To begin with it was just the name of Adam's father, but at the time of Enosh, the son of Seth, they started worshipping the Name of God (Gen 4:26), which is typically considered a sin in rabbinical commentaries.

Another example is how the Egyptian word for the sun, Ra, became the god carrying the same name over time. Modern English has a bunch of Egyptian composites in it's lexicons. For instance, Horizon and Hour are derived from Horus. Same as our name for the sun-- Sol, it's one of the names of Mithras, and our names for the planets and our calendars, well it's all too obvious.

To an archaeologist, let's say 2000 years into the future, these things might suggest our generation worshipped the Roman pantheon and that we spoke a language so mingled with Egyptian religious patterns that we probably worshipped the Egyptian pantheon too, only more subtly.
edit on 4-8-2014 by Utnapisjtim because: misc first §



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 06:32 AM
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a reply to: TheJourney

I've tried that app once, it's good for offline studies and can save you some time compared to using books. At least for the quick lookup. On the other hand, in order to make a comprehensive analysis, a traditional library is better, at least until there comes a program that "has it all". But E-sword is a great supplement especially for those (may God have mercy) terrible offline days


By the way, relating to the name of the app, the word for tongue in Latin, is Lingua, same word as in Language and Linguist, and the lingua resembles the blade of a double edged sword.

Assyrian sage Ahiqar, 7th century BC, said "The word is mightier than the sword." And Greek playwright Euripides, 5th century BC wrote "The tongue is mightier than the blade." (source)
edit on 4-8-2014 by Utnapisjtim because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 07:25 AM
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a reply to: Utnapisjtim

that would work IF it was isolated, but it isn't. for example, it comes from the same part of the world as the sumerian, akkadian and babylonian texts, which talk about the same guy: enki or ea or enki-ea. he's seen saving the noah figure from the flood, explaining to him how to build an ark to escape the flood waters and the ark lands on a mt. next to mt. ararat. he's depicted confusing the languages at babel in the akkadian text, enmerkar and the lord of arrata. he's depicted creating humans as workers. these are not isolated in different countries or even with different stories.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 08:03 AM
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a reply to: undo

I'm aware of all that, and these names and words are indeed related, but as El and Ea are two different deities in Akkadian etc. they belong to different, highly conflicting traditions. While the pre-Hebraic stories reflected in Genesis are attributed to several different deities, the Hebrews gathered it all as the works of One God, a conceptual head of all gods. It's name reflect several earlier deities, there is the El or Al init in Elohim and there is an unwritten r in the Heth in Eloh[r]im, (like the "guttural" fricative between A and m in 'Ahmed' represented by a h) bringing in the Hebrew word for Light, Or: El + or + -im that can be loosely translated "Father of the Lights".
edit on 4-8-2014 by Utnapisjtim because: fricative


ETA: And according to ancient rabbibical traditions and the Kabbalah Jah is just the first syllable quite lengthy word starting off with J-H-V-H- and continuing to become a word of 72 letters. Some even say it reflects a 72 bit code needed to operate the Image of God, ancient computer code in other words.
edit on 4-8-2014 by Utnapisjtim because: eta



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 08:33 AM
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a reply to: Utnapisjtim

the divine council is comprised of 72 members.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 08:38 AM
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a reply to: undo

So they say. And in 72 years the Sun moves one arc degree backwards in the zodiac on a given date (thus Passover at the time of Moses was celebrated at the start of the annual flooding of the Nile), due to the precession of the axis mundi, or earth axis. In some systems there were 72 constellations in each hemisphere, 144 in total. I refer to these numbers as funnynumbers. They keep showing up everywhere, the ancients loved these numbers. The pentagram consists of 5 x 72° turns, so it is directly linked to the golden measure, since the distance between the five horns can be found by dividing the radius in the golden proportion, producing a ten horned star. Or roughly π*φ=5

ETA: Isaiah, Hoseah, Joshuah and Jesus are not the same person though they are namesakes and all tell much the same story. Get it?
edit on 4-8-2014 by Utnapisjtim because: ...



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 11:47 AM
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originally posted by: Utnapisjtim
a reply to: undo
The pentagram consists of 5 x 72° turns, so it is directly linked to the golden measure, since the distance between the five horns can be found by dividing the radius in the golden proportion, producing a ten horned star. Or roughly π*φ=5


Or more precisely, by doing some fine tuning to my rough equation above, the relationship between a decagon and a circle is thus:

The perimeter of a polygon is found by ==> 2nr sin(π/n) ==> where n is the number of sides and r is the radius

And the circumference of a circle with diameter 1 is π

thus ==> 5 / (2*10*0.5 sin(π/10)) = φ = 1.618033989....

Just had one of them moments: Genius is the art of the insane
edit on 4-8-2014 by Utnapisjtim because: decagon, not pentagon



posted on Aug, 5 2014 @ 05:17 AM
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originally posted by: Utnapisjtim

==> 5 / (2*10*0.5 sin(π/10)) = φ = 1.618033989....


Reducing that gives an elegantererer result:

==> 2 sin(π/10) = φ




posted on Aug, 14 2014 @ 06:59 AM
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originally posted by: Utnapisjtim

originally posted by: Utnapisjtim

==> 5 / (2*10*0.5 sin(π/10)) = φ = 1.618033989....


Reducing that gives an elegantererer result:

==> 2 sin(π/10) = φ



That should be ==> 1+2sin(π/10) = φ = 1.618033989....



posted on Aug, 26 2014 @ 08:52 AM
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a reply to: Utnapisjtim

Here's a good example which clearly shows different authorship for different parts of the Torah:

Genesis 4:26 goes: Seth also had a son, and he named him Enosh. At that time people began to call on the name of Jahveh.

According to Exodus 6:3 however, Jahveh says that Abraham, Isaac and Jacob worshipped him as 'God Almighty' that's the commonly used English translation for 'El Shadday', but the word Shaddai can be from Shadad, 'to Destroy'. If El Shaddai should thereby be the God Abraham discovered in Uruk, he was doing research on El which is of Ugarithic and Canaanean origin. Abraham may not have introduced El Shaddai to Canaan, he may have travelled to find him.

Anyhow: Eloan an Priestly souces claim Jahveh (or the Tetragrammaton) was first revealed to Moses, while the Jahvist and Redactor sources have it that it started in the days of Seth an his son.





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