The Mystery of the Serpent Mounds...of Scotland?

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posted on Jul, 16 2014 @ 03:51 PM
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The majestic beauty of the great Serpent Mound of Ohio is the picture that comes to mind when we think of these ancient earth structures. Curving across the landscape for 420m, the Serpent Mound is estimated to be around 1000 years old.



In the late nineteenth century, Harvard University archaeologist Frederic Ward Putnam excavated Serpent Mound and, based on his work, later archaeologists attributed the effigy to the Adena culture that flourished from 800 B.C. to A.D. 100.This theory on the site’s origin held true until a 1991 site excavation was able to radiocarbon date pieces of charcoal found within Serpent Mound. Through the radiocarbon dating, archeologists now believe that Serpent Mound is approximately 900 years old. By this date, the creators of Serpent Mound belonged to the Fort Ancient culture (A.D. 1000-1500).


Ohio History



But there are others. Scotland has two serpent mounds of its own: one in Ayrshire and one in Argyll, both on the west coast.
Who built them? And why? They are vaguely attributed to the Druids, although their purpose and origins remain obscure.
One thought is that the Ohio mound follows the configuration of the constellation Draco:



The star pattern of the constellation Draco fits with fair precision to the Serpent Mound, with the ancient Pole Star, Thuban (α Draconis), at its geographical center within the first of seven coils from the head. The fact that the body of Serpent Mound follows the pattern of Draco may support various theses. Putnam's 1865 refurbishment of the earthwork could have been correctly accomplished in that a comparison of Romain's or Fletcher and Cameron's maps from the 1980s show how the margins of the Serpent align with great accuracy to a large portion of Draco. Some researchers date the earthwork to around 5,000 years ago, based on the position of Draco, through the backward motion of precessionary circle of the ecliptic when Thuban was the Pole Star. Alignment of the effigy to the Pole Star at that position also shows how true north may have been found. This was not known until 1987 because lodestone and modern compasses give incorrect readings at the site.


Wiki serpent mound

It could be that the Scottish mounds also mimic this constellation. The Druids were recorded as being ‘equal to the Persians’ in their knowledge of the skies.



In Skelmorlie is one of the most remarkable antiquities in Scotland a ‘Serpent Mound’, supposed to have been used by the ancient Britons in the worship of the Sun and the Serpent, and other religious rites. The head of the Serpent lies behind Brigend House and the ridge forming the body is now severed by the road running up the hill at Meigle. In the 1870’s Dr. Phené of Chelsea made some interesting excavations, discovering a paved platform some 80 feet long, and evidence of early cremations. The details were fully reported in the Glasgow Herald and the Scotsman at the time and there are specimens in the Kelvingrove Museum in Glasgow.

Recent examination of the pieces at Kelvingrove confirms that they are indeed burned human bones, something which was always disputed about Phene's original findings. Artefacts found at the Kempock Stone during similar excavations in the 19th Century are now also due to be tested alongside items found during the controversial excavations at Langbank, recently rediscovered at the National Museum Edinburgh. It is suggested that dating of the artefacts and remains will show them to be contemporary, and that the strange serpentlike drawings uncovered on stones at Langbank are linked to the "serpent mound" at Skelmorlie, via some sort of celtic river or serpent worship cult.


Tales of the Oak

The Skelmorlie mound is in Ayrshire and the Argyllshire site is found at Loch Nell:

Skelmorlie link

Loch Nell (below)



Megalithic Portal

Unfortunately both are neglected and in poor condition now - and shamefully ignored - although a drawing remains of Loch Nell from a Miss Cummings in 1872:



Could this suggest early contact between two cultures who are not thought to have met? A myth persists that St Brendan, an Irishman, sailed west in the middle of the 6th century with a party of monks –maybe he did. Do the mounds have something to do with the snake carvings found on stones throughout Scotland?

(Aberlemno)



Hope you enjoyed reading and found it as interesting as I did.




posted on Jul, 16 2014 @ 04:10 PM
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Looks like the teenagers had a lot of time on their hands back then too. I guess it kept them out of trouble.



posted on Jul, 16 2014 @ 04:16 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

Lol!
Those pesky kids, confusing me!



posted on Jul, 16 2014 @ 04:25 PM
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2 cultures independently designing snake motifs doesn't necessarily mean there was any contact between the 2- the snake is a very common creature.



posted on Jul, 16 2014 @ 04:28 PM
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Burial mounds across the world.

Pyramids across the world.

Standing stones pretty much everywhere.

And now serpent mounds across continents too ?

I would have thought that the 6th century could be late for a significant earthwork like this to be created in.Scotland but who knows - It needs RCD really.
It's such a shame that these significant historical sites are neglected.

+-Anyone thinking that last stone looks like a serpent puzzle stone from skyrim?
edit on 1672014 by DodgyDawg because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 16 2014 @ 04:34 PM
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a reply to: conundrummer

You're right, it absolutely doesn't mean contact, but I find the similarities suggestive.
Indigenous snakes in Scotland are spindly, hopeless things - I find it very unlikely that anyone in their right mind would worship one and so it 'feels' like an external belief carried into Scotland from somewhere else.



posted on Jul, 16 2014 @ 04:36 PM
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They remind me of hugel beds, raised earth agriculture set in such a way so as to maximise growing potential of an area of land, easier to harvest multiple crops from said area.
www.inspirationgreen.com...

not saying its what it is, just looks similar



posted on Jul, 16 2014 @ 04:46 PM
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a reply to: countingdown

They're packed with large stones along the 'spine' so I don't think that's what they are, but those hugel beds are a brilliant idea. I'm going to make myself one of those!



posted on Jul, 16 2014 @ 04:52 PM
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Just put me in mind, shape-wise
Good luck with the permaculture, it works well and simple too not to mention money saving


thanks for the reply



posted on Jul, 16 2014 @ 05:16 PM
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fands
any feathers?



posted on Jul, 16 2014 @ 05:25 PM
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a reply to: Danbones

I don't think so....
What are you thinking? Feathered snakes? These sites are so under-researched, it's hard to know what's going on really



posted on Jul, 16 2014 @ 06:01 PM
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a reply to: beansidhe
Hi B
The reason I asked was in relation to the look alike (was it celtic?) bird headed god and the bird headed hairdos on some of the local traditional tribal headdresses, and the gills on the mudsnakes on both sides of the ocean, and the feathered serpents in south American lore...
(sorry, not on the net much at the moment, and I don't have time to collect the details, but many were mentioned on your standing stones thread)



posted on Jul, 16 2014 @ 06:26 PM
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originally posted by: Danbones
a reply to: beansidhe
Hi B
The reason I asked was in relation to the look alike (was it celtic?) bird headed god and the bird headed hairdos on some of the local traditional tribal headdresses, and the gills on the mudsnakes on both sides of the ocean, and the feathered serpents in south American lore...
(sorry, not on the net much at the moment, and I don't have time to collect the details, but many were mentioned on your standing stones thread)



Are you thinking of Quetzalcoatl?

I work with a guy from Skelmorlie, need to ask him if he knows anything about this next time I get a chance.

I am reasonably well versed with my country's history but haven't come across much, if any, in the way of serpent worship in Celtic culture other than sea serpents/dragons or as symbols of fertility etc. As far as I recall, it was mainly things that were prevalent here at the time that they worshipped as deities, horse gods, Stags (and other antlered mythical deities), water gods and matriarchal gods; Interesting parallels with the Mesoamerican and North American geographical features and stone carvings though.

I've been in the Kelvingrove museum recently and can't recall seeing the mentioned exhibit, need to look for it next time i'm in. I'm also heading down to Ayrshire for a long weekend in September, may have to take a wee drive and see if I can see this mound for myself.


Interesting thread OP, thanks.
edit on 16/7/14 by Morgil because: Grammar



posted on Jul, 16 2014 @ 10:44 PM
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Someone else made a thread about this a couple years ago here(I think) and I posted a photo of the mounds in Ohio. We had a discussion about it and how they may be connected. Very interesting stuff! If it could be proven that there is a connection, it would change a lot of history. lol

There's also mounds in Moundsville WV, but they aren't serpentine in nature. But still interesting, nonetheless. Thanks for posting!



posted on Jul, 17 2014 @ 05:03 AM
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a reply to: Fylgje

Thanks Fylgje, it was you that taught me about the serpent mound of Ohio, in another thread! I wish ours were treated as well as the ones in America



posted on Jul, 17 2014 @ 05:08 AM
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a reply to: Danbones

Hi you!
There's no mention of feathers, and yes I remember all the similarities well from the stones thread. I can't find any old stories about the mounds either, which is usually a good way of getting a sense of something about them.

Hopefully Morgil can find out some facts if s/he visits soon.
Hope all is good with you, Dan x



posted on Jul, 17 2014 @ 09:25 AM
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originally posted by: DodgyDawg


I would have thought that the 6th century could be late for a significant earthwork like this to be created in.Scotland but who knows - It needs RCD really.
It's such a shame that these significant historical sites are neglected.



Sorry for the delay in responding, I had to think about your reply. 6th c is probably too late for this mound but...what if Brendan wasn't the first man to go over? Just a thought



posted on Jul, 17 2014 @ 09:32 AM
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The star pattern of the constellation Draco fits with fair precision to the Serpent Mound, with the ancient Pole Star, Thuban (α Draconis), at its geographical center within the first of seven coils from the head.


Hmmm, isn't Draco where the supposed reptilians come from?



posted on Jul, 17 2014 @ 10:21 AM
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a reply to: jaws1975

I hope not....



posted on Jul, 17 2014 @ 12:57 PM
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Yep, link





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