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Sedna: The Extrasolar Object

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posted on Dec, 2 2004 @ 03:22 PM
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A number of astronomers are toying with the idea that Sedna, the latest and farthest solar object is actually a captured object from a passing star, nearly 4 billion years ago. When formed, the Sun would have been in a dense cloud of other stars. Calculations put the odds that Sedna could have been swapped had an exchange occured at around 10%.

seattlepi

there are actually two groups suggesting this. one says a close, strong force, which would also explain the sudden edge of the kuiper belt. the other favors a distant, gentle force, which fits neatly with the lack of objects in the area, a problem not solved by the first thought.

it's one helluva exampe of 'thinking out of the box.'




posted on Dec, 2 2004 @ 03:26 PM
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It is possible but almost impossible to test without taking samples from the supposed native solar planets and taking a sample from sedna and comparing them



posted on Dec, 2 2004 @ 03:41 PM
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Interesting theories. I'm still waiting for Nibiru to appear though



posted on Dec, 2 2004 @ 03:57 PM
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Jackal:

itd be nice, but, yeah, fat chance.

id like to see a number of successful models run with varying variables (as in, the actual variables vary, in addition to their inherent variations). its the closest well get right now. the next step would be to sample it and to compare it to our solar system. the odds are it would show up inconclusive, but it would be part of a much wider map of the system, sampling everything and comparing them.



posted on Dec, 2 2004 @ 04:01 PM
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Someone not too long ago, whether it was in its own thread or just part of one, suggested that most planets are actually captured from other stars. Specifically planets blown away from a star in the event of a supernova. Perhaps he/she was on to something.

I'll do some searching for that thread.

EDIT: Though the numbers are low, I'd still say there's a high chance. Why's this? Because the chance of a red dwarf star coming and stealing Earth from the Sun's orbit before the Sun begins to expand and die is higher than winning the lottery. So if the odds for that happening are low in comparisson to the lottery, the odds of Sedna being from another star may not be that far off either.

[edit on 12/2/2004 by cmdrkeenkid]



posted on Dec, 2 2004 @ 04:13 PM
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fascinating. i think, for the time being, ill stick with the planetary nebula thang, it seems to be working out. athough, im sure there are some irregularities more readily explained if we captured the planets.

still, better than the lottery. thats not saying much, but its pretty damn high, comparably to what i would expect.



posted on Dec, 2 2004 @ 04:23 PM
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Originally posted by Amorymeltzer
Jackal:

itd be nice, but, yeah, fat chance.

id like to see a number of successful models run with varying variables (as in, the actual variables vary, in addition to their inherent variations). its the closest well get right now. the next step would be to sample it and to compare it to our solar system. the odds are it would show up inconclusive, but it would be part of a much wider map of the system, sampling everything and comparing them.


You are exactly right
But any tests of that nature are going to take place outside of my lifetime.



posted on Dec, 2 2004 @ 04:48 PM
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Originally posted by BlackJackal
You are exactly right
But any tests of that nature are going to take place outside of my lifetime.


NOT IF I HAVE ANYTHING TO SAY ABOUT IT!

*heavy sigh*
yeah, you're right. still, maybe my great-grandkids, while browsing ATS (v68.e) will come upon this thread, and post the answer.

Amory Isaac Meltzer

how sad. ive nothing else to my name than my name...



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