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What's blacker than "black?" Vantablack!

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posted on Jul, 14 2014 @ 11:38 AM
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This stuff would be hell as clothes in the desert, but as thermal heating for water it could work. Would not want to wear this in the sun at all. At night though would be okay, as long as you were not jogging along the road.

Solar oven, except instead of mirrors, the sunlight just absorbs in to this material. A solar hot water heater for a shower, would be good too.




posted on Jul, 14 2014 @ 11:58 AM
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Lots of comments about clothing, but the material is "grown" on aluminum, with no mention of an ability to remove it from the aluminum.

It seems straightforward to use it for optics applications (telescopes and cameras) as it can be grown directly on the tube. Same for aircraft (which are already aluminum skinned), coating would be straightforward. Even heat gathering technology, which are usually made of a rigid material.

For anyone to wear it, you'd have to basically wear a suit of vantablack coated armor or risk tearing through your aluminum foil pants every time you took a step. Either way, it's going to be loud.

It's super cool, but I don't think goth girls will be wearing it anytime soon.
edit on 14-7-2014 by stutteringp0et because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2014 @ 12:07 PM
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a reply to: stutteringp0et



For anyone to wear it, you'd have to basically wear a suit of vantablack coated armor or risk tearing through your aluminum foil pants every time you took a step. Either way, it's going to be loud


This is ATS, what makes you think some of us aren't dealing with these types of wardrobe malfunctions already?


edit on 2014-7-14 by theantediluvian because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2014 @ 01:08 PM
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Goths are going to love this stuff..



posted on Jul, 14 2014 @ 01:12 PM
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a reply to: theantediluvian

I guess this means that Black is the new Black?

Don't know how politically correct that terminology will be received all the same.
LoL

Looks cool to me!



posted on Jul, 14 2014 @ 01:32 PM
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Ninjas everywhere rejoice!!!

I seriously want to paint one of my guitars with this. Where can I get some?? lol



posted on Jul, 14 2014 @ 02:04 PM
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As far as military applications....I wonder how this new material would react to weaponized lasers ....Since that is the direction military's are going...And lasers are indeed focused light.



posted on Jul, 14 2014 @ 02:10 PM
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a reply to: theantediluvian

The first thing that comes to mind is Camo. The second thing is, I wonder if this is some reverse engineered tech ?



posted on Jul, 14 2014 @ 02:12 PM
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imagine the fun you could have wearing that in the form of this!





I can't seem to find a "place your order" page anywhere....

edit on 14/7/14 by Ghost147 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2014 @ 02:49 PM
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originally posted by: highfreq
As far as military applications....I wonder how this new material would react to weaponized lasers ....Since that is the direction military's are going...And lasers are indeed focused light.


Since the material is designed to absorb light rather than reflect light, the answer would probably be very spectactularly badly. It would be good for stealth, bad for lasers.

www.youtube.com...
edit on 14-7-2014 by Junkheap because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2014 @ 06:06 PM
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Surrender to the void



posted on Jul, 14 2014 @ 06:26 PM
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a reply to: theantediluvian

It'll be used for invisibility purposes.



posted on Jul, 14 2014 @ 06:29 PM
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If it absorbs almost 100% of the light shining on it, a new sort of light sensor might be possible if it were also possible to interface the substance on the side facing away from the light with electrical elements which were as sensitive.

There might be quite a few applications for such a thing, depending on its sensitivity and the sensitivity of the electronic handshake with it.

Photography and astronomy might have an important new tool. Military applications, like sensors of all kinds, satellite surveillance systems and other things might be improved by using it.

If constructed properly, it might have useful light polarizing properties.
edit on 14-7-2014 by ipsedixit because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2014 @ 06:52 PM
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a reply to: Qumulys

Sorry but radar reflects radio waves.

Not light waves.

The human eye can not pick up 'infrared'.


edit on 14-7-2014 by neo96 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2014 @ 07:25 PM
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originally posted by: Beowolfs
Doubt the military would use this for stealth. A material this dark would stand out even at night.

I wonder f this absorbs all of the electromagnetic spectrum !



posted on Jul, 14 2014 @ 07:35 PM
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originally posted by: neo96
a reply to: Qumulys

Sorry but radar reflects radio waves.

Not light waves.

The human eye can not pick up 'infrared'.



As i queried above though. Visible light is just a small band of the electromagnetic spectrum, which includes infra red, ultra violet, microvaes, radio waves, plus pretty much all radiation.

They're telling us it absorbs visible light, if that absorbtion extends to greater EMS bandwidths...full radition protection from a material millimeters thick rather than inches? Total invisibility to radar?

Throw in a thermocouple heat exchanger and you can hide, protect and power your drones indefinitely.

Well, maybe, anyway

edit on 14-7-2014 by idmonster because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2014 @ 07:54 PM
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a reply to: idmonster

I don't think so.

With the 'creation' of 3d radar of modern day 'stealth' is a pipe dream.

Hell back even during world war two radar was able to pick up naval artillery rounds hitting the water.

No billion dollar paint needed.
edit on 14-7-2014 by neo96 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2014 @ 08:20 PM
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a reply to: abe froman

It will make for great ninja (assasin camo) suit.



posted on Jul, 15 2014 @ 12:28 AM
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originally posted by: theantediluvian


A British company has produced a "strange, alien" material so black that it absorbs all but 0.035 per cent of visual light, setting a new world record. To stare at the "super black" coating made of carbon nanotubes – each 10,000 times thinner than a human hair – is an odd experience. It is so dark that the human eye cannot understand what it is seeing. Shapes and contours are lost, leaving nothing but an apparent abyss.


Time to redo the special effects of the Monolith in 2001: A Space Odyssey. That's almost exactly how the Monolith is described in the novel.

Arthur C. Clarke thought of it first!
edit on 15-7-2014 by CryHavoc because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 15 2014 @ 04:39 AM
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If this material could be incorporated in the substrate of solar panels, it seems that they could be made most efficient by absorbing just about all of the sunlight that they are exposed to.



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