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Separation of Church and State

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posted on Apr, 24 2005 @ 01:37 AM
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Before some of you decide topaint me as some religious zealot, let me explain myself to you. I am a Constitutionalist. I study the "constituion for the united states of America" (Those who know will understand the capitalization). My interest in this particular are of study started two decades ago when I was in law enforcement. The two things that made me think things were not right in this country was the current governmental contradictions with the 2nd, 4th, 5th and 6th amendments to the constitution.

After opening that Pandora's box, I had to leave law enforcement, and the continued pursuit of knowledge has led me to belive there is an intentional and malicious plan to destroy this country by attacking both the nation and the government that is supposed to serve it. The 1st amendment is only a part of the attack.




posted on May, 23 2005 @ 03:12 PM
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That was a monster post Thomas, thanks for the work. I'd like to sum up my ideas fairly shortly though.

We need to maintain a seperation in the sense that we need freedom for the churches, not the government. Private citizens should be able to allow all their influences (which are greater than simply religion, regardless of the type) to affect their choices and opinions, to include whom to vote for.

Should a Christian be voted into office on a Christian platform, then there is no secret, and since politicians are private citizens in a representative position, they should use their influences as anyone else would. It of course should be said that they need to take into account the array of people in which they represent, but to have someone annex part of what makes them is simply not an American principle, and never has been.

Life would be a better place if Christians acted like they should, and like their religion tells them to, but it is in opposition to the whole of the human condition, and we are weak.

Our problems lie not with religion, but with the wickedness of man, as man is able to pervert anything, not just religion.



posted on May, 23 2005 @ 04:07 PM
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Jethro, I agree wholeheartedly that we should act as God told us to act, but it never seems to happen. It didn't happen in the beginning of the nation, either.

Remember, Tom Jefferson said that of all the religions, the Christian faith was the best one upon which to build the nation, not the followers of the faith. We are human, too. Darn it!



posted on Jun, 8 2005 @ 11:45 PM
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Originally posted by Thomas Crowne
Before some of you decide topaint me as some religious zealot, let me explain myself to you. I am a Constitutionalist. I study the "constituion for the united states of America" (Those who know will understand the capitalization). My interest in this particular are of study started two decades ago when I was in law enforcement. The two things that made me think things were not right in this country was the current governmental contradictions with the 2nd, 4th, 5th and 6th amendments to the constitution.

After opening that Pandora's box, I had to leave law enforcement, and the continued pursuit of knowledge has led me to believe there is an intentional and malicious plan to destroy this country by attacking both the nation and the government that is supposed to serve it. The 1st amendment is only a part of the attack.


Damn Man wish I could vote ya Way Above! You would have votes for the next 6 months. So I gave one to KrazyJethro! LOL

In the same vein as your final, I submit to you:

Washington's Farewell Address:

www.yale.edu...

Good Parts:



Interwoven as is the love of liberty with every ligament of your hearts, no recommendation of mine is necessary to fortify or confirm the attachment.

The unity of government which constitutes you one people is also now dear to you. It is justly so, for it is a main pillar in the edifice of your real independence, the support of your tranquility at home, your peace abroad; of your safety; of your prosperity; of that very liberty which you so highly prize. But as it is easy to foresee that, from different causes and from different quarters, much pains will be taken, many artifices employed to weaken in your minds the conviction of this truth; as this is the point in your political fortress against which the batteries of internal and external enemies will be most constantly and actively (though often covertly and insidiously) directed, it is of infinite moment that you should properly estimate the immense value of your national union to your collective and individual happiness; that you should cherish a cordial, habitual, and immovable attachment to it; accustoming yourselves to think and speak of it as of the palladium of your political safety and prosperity; watching for its preservation with jealous anxiety; discountenancing whatever may suggest even a suspicion that it can in any event be abandoned; and indignantly frowning upon the first dawning of every attempt to alienate any portion of our country from the rest, or to enfeeble the sacred ties which now link together the various parts.




I have already intimated to you the danger of parties in the State, with particular reference to the founding of them on geographical discriminations. Let me now take a more comprehensive view, and warn you in the most solemn manner against the baneful effects of the spirit of party generally




It serves always to distract the public councils and enfeeble the public administration. It agitates the community with ill-founded jealousies and false alarms, kindles the animosity of one part against another, foments occasionally riot and insurrection. It opens the door to foreign influence and corruption, which finds a facilitated access to the government itself through the channels of party passions. Thus the policy and the will of one country are subjected to the policy and will of another.


And finally on topic...May favorite:



Observe good faith and justice towards all nations; cultivate peace and harmony with all. Religion and morality enjoin this conduct; and can it be, that good policy does not equally enjoin it 7 It will be worthy of a free, enlightened, and at no distant period, a great nation, to give to mankind the magnanimous and too novel example of a people always guided by an exalted justice and benevolence. Who can doubt that, in the course of time and things, the fruits of such a plan would richly repay any temporary advantages which might be lost by a steady adherence to it ? Can it be that Providence has not connected the permanent felicity of a nation with its virtue ? The experiment, at least, is recommended by every sentiment which ennobles human nature. Alas! is it rendered impossible by its vices?


All I got to say about all of this is: "Word"! LOL



posted on Jun, 21 2005 @ 09:17 PM
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I see a little bit of confusion here - whenever there is a citation that includes a belief in God, some people seem to be "usurping" that reference to mean Christianity. News flash! Many people who believe in God do not accept the divinity of Jesus.

Maybe you just forgot.




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