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Ask any question you want about Physics

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posted on Aug, 7 2014 @ 11:11 AM
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posted on Aug, 7 2014 @ 12:59 PM
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posted on Aug, 7 2014 @ 01:17 PM
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posted on Aug, 7 2014 @ 02:14 PM
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posted on Aug, 7 2014 @ 02:28 PM
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posted on Aug, 7 2014 @ 04:16 PM
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originally posted by: dragonridr

originally posted by: KrzYma
I see my question went down few pages ago... I just ask again

Please explain the attraction/repulsion force in this video
(starting at 2:20 till 25:15)

Tesla coil powered light bolt repels human hand and attracts a piece of copper


It doesnt repel the human hand thats called acting from the set up looks like they created a resonant coil basically same thing Tesla did. We call this resonant inductive coupling in most electrical systems we want to remove the ringing which is an oscillation of the signal or in this case the current. This oscillation can be transferred by a near field wave if you place a mike to close to a speaker thats the whine or screech you here. But for this we can use this oscillating signal to move electrons in our other coil basically looking like we transferred current through the air TADA magic.


what are you talking about ???
en.wikipedia.org...
what resonance what coil ??

there is a Tesla coil, yes, as power supply, but how about this light-bolt attracting this piece of copper ?



It doesnt repel the human hand thats called acting


?? acting ? like an actor ?

are you drunk ?!?!



posted on Aug, 7 2014 @ 07:17 PM
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originally posted by: KrzYma
what are you talking about ???
en.wikipedia.org...
what resonance what coil ??
Apparently dragonridr understands the video you asked him to watch better than you do. He's talking about what's shown during the time indexes you asked him to watch in the video.

The video even give's Tesla's patent number, so here's the patent.


Referring to the drawing, A is a coil, generally of many turns and of 'a very large diameter, wound in spiral form either about a magnetic core or not, as may be found necessary. C is a second coil, formed of a conductor of. much larger section and smaller IIO transformer.
In response to "what coil?", in the patent, A is a coil and C is a second coil.

So why are you asking what coil? They cite that patent and say they are following that patent with their design.


there is a Tesla coil, yes, as power supply, but how about this light-bolt attracting this piece of copper ?
Why don't you give an exact time index and maybe someone might answer, but most people aren't going to suffer through 25 minutes of that, guess what you're talking about, and then have you complain because they guessed wrong, because you meant something else.



posted on Aug, 7 2014 @ 07:26 PM
link   

originally posted by: KrzYma

originally posted by: dragonridr

originally posted by: KrzYma
I see my question went down few pages ago... I just ask again

Please explain the attraction/repulsion force in this video
(starting at 2:20 till 25:15)

Tesla coil powered light bolt repels human hand and attracts a piece of copper


It doesnt repel the human hand thats called acting from the set up looks like they created a resonant coil basically same thing Tesla did. We call this resonant inductive coupling in most electrical systems we want to remove the ringing which is an oscillation of the signal or in this case the current. This oscillation can be transferred by a near field wave if you place a mike to close to a speaker thats the whine or screech you here. But for this we can use this oscillating signal to move electrons in our other coil basically looking like we transferred current through the air TADA magic.


what are you talking about ???
en.wikipedia.org...
what resonance what coil ??

there is a Tesla coil, yes, as power supply, but how about this light-bolt attracting this piece of copper ?



It doesnt repel the human hand thats called acting


?? acting ? like an actor ?

are you drunk ?!?!


Now i see your problem with understanding physics you clearly do not understand context. Inductive coupling occurs with two coils one to create emf noise and one to receive it. This is right from your link!




Resonant inductive coupling, Synchronized Magnetic-flux Phase Coupling or electrodynamic induction is the near field wireless transmission of electrical energy between two coils that are tuned to resonate at the same frequency


And guess what it creates a magnetic field so is it surprising this same principle is used to charge my cell phone. I have an i phone and if you have one you might want to get this its worth it. But it isnt magic and we understand how it works Tesla didnt of course at the time since electricity was still in the experimental stage.

www.witricity.com...



posted on Aug, 7 2014 @ 08:05 PM
link   

originally posted by: dragonridr

originally posted by: KrzYma

originally posted by: dragonridr

originally posted by: KrzYma
I see my question went down few pages ago... I just ask again

Please explain the attraction/repulsion force in this video
(starting at 2:20 till 25:15)

Tesla coil powered light bolt repels human hand and attracts a piece of copper


It doesnt repel the human hand thats called acting from the set up looks like they created a resonant coil basically same thing Tesla did. We call this resonant inductive coupling in most electrical systems we want to remove the ringing which is an oscillation of the signal or in this case the current. This oscillation can be transferred by a near field wave if you place a mike to close to a speaker thats the whine or screech you here. But for this we can use this oscillating signal to move electrons in our other coil basically looking like we transferred current through the air TADA magic.


what are you talking about ???
en.wikipedia.org...
what resonance what coil ??

there is a Tesla coil, yes, as power supply, but how about this light-bolt attracting this piece of copper ?



It doesnt repel the human hand thats called acting


?? acting ? like an actor ?

are you drunk ?!?!


Now i see your problem with understanding physics you clearly do not understand context. Inductive coupling occurs with two coils one to create emf noise and one to receive it. This is right from your link!




Resonant inductive coupling, Synchronized Magnetic-flux Phase Coupling or electrodynamic induction is the near field wireless transmission of electrical energy between two coils that are tuned to resonate at the same frequency


And guess what it creates a magnetic field so is it surprising this same principle is used to charge my cell phone. I have an i phone and if you have one you might want to get this its worth it. But it isnt magic and we understand how it works Tesla didnt of course at the time since electricity was still in the experimental stage.

www.witricity.com...


so this
www.witricity.com...
is your answer to the question why those copper piece gets attracted by a lightbulb ??

WOW !



posted on Aug, 7 2014 @ 08:09 PM
link   

originally posted by: Arbitrageur

originally posted by: KrzYma
what are you talking about ???
en.wikipedia.org...
what resonance what coil ??
Apparently dragonridr understands the video you asked him to watch better than you do. He's talking about what's shown during the time indexes you asked him to watch in the video.

The video even give's Tesla's patent number, so here's the patent.


Referring to the drawing, A is a coil, generally of many turns and of 'a very large diameter, wound in spiral form either about a magnetic core or not, as may be found necessary. C is a second coil, formed of a conductor of. much larger section and smaller IIO transformer.
In response to "what coil?", in the patent, A is a coil and C is a second coil.

So why are you asking what coil? They cite that patent and say they are following that patent with their design.


there is a Tesla coil, yes, as power supply, but how about this light-bolt attracting this piece of copper ?
Why don't you give an exact time index and maybe someone might answer, but most people aren't going to suffer through 25 minutes of that, guess what you're talking about, and then have you complain because they guessed wrong, because you meant something else.


exactly what I was expecting,
changing subject, turning words around...

NICE !



posted on Aug, 7 2014 @ 09:04 PM
link   

originally posted by: KrzYma
exactly what I was expecting,
changing subject, turning words around...
How is asking you to provide the time index related to your question in your posted video changing the subject? Everything I posted was about your question and your video.

You gave a 25 minute range, why not narrow down exactly which part you're asking about?
edit on 7-8-2014 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Aug, 7 2014 @ 09:08 PM
link   

originally posted by: Arbitrageur

originally posted by: KrzYma
exactly what I was expecting,
changing subject, turning words around...
How is asking you to provide the time index related to your question in your posted video changing the subject? Everything I posted was about your question and your video.
The video obviously wasnt what he thought it was because when i explained it to him he got confused.



posted on Aug, 7 2014 @ 09:24 PM
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a reply to: dragonridr
Clearly you understood what the main point of the video was based on your description.

And in response KrzYma asked what you were talking about (which was pretty much what was in the video).

But I think he may have had a more specific question than what you responded to, which is why I asked for a specific time index, in order to resolve any miscommunication. How that's changing the subject is beyond me.



posted on Aug, 8 2014 @ 07:16 AM
link   

originally posted by: Arbitrageur

originally posted by: KrzYma
exactly what I was expecting,
changing subject, turning words around...
How is asking you to provide the time index related to your question in your posted video changing the subject? Everything I posted was about your question and your video.

You gave a 25 minute range, why not narrow down exactly which part you're asking about?


OK, sorry, I see where the confusion comes from.

In my question I said time index 2:20 to 25:15
a typo, sorry
should be 22:00 till 25:15

there was also the auto correct function responsible for turning light-bulb into lightning-bolt in my question.
I apologize for overseeing this, which is crucial I see now.



to clear my question I need to say,
there is a coil, Tesla coil as power supply for impulse/oscillating current - may be essential but is not in the question

there is a lightbulb in the experiment that is my point of interest , if run by AC current, nothing happens.
if run be the Tesla current, it attracts a piece of copper and repels (to the comments in the video) human hand

please explain this in terms of MS science
edit on 8-8-2014 by KrzYma because: (no reason given)

edit on 8-8-2014 by KrzYma because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 8 2014 @ 11:16 AM
link   

originally posted by: KrzYma
to clear my question I need to say,
there is a coil, Tesla coil as power supply for impulse/oscillating current - may be essential but is not in the question

there is a lightbulb in the experiment that is my point of interest , if run by AC current, nothing happens.
if run be the Tesla current, it attracts a piece of copper and repels (to the comments in the video) human hand

please explain this in terms of MS science
Thanks for the clarification. Those points you clarified make a big difference in understanding your question, especially fixing your typo.

There are several things to point out starting around 20:50:

-They say they don't have proper equipment to do a proper analysis so they resort to making visual comments. If a mainstream lab did this experiment they would get the proper equipment to figure out what's going on.

-Note that he says it's repelling his hand about 20:50 and then he gets an electric shock at 21:14, which might be a static shock, like when you shuffle your feet on carpet in the winter and touch a doorknob (unless he contacts some metal part that's hard to see in the video). You said the coil isn't relevant to your question, but it is, and he explains why:

-The regular bulb is about 115V 60HZ standard AC, while the experimental bulb he says exhibits arcing which he says meaning it's at several thousand volts, presumably created by the coil. Now again in a mainstream lab, someone would actually measure voltage, not make a wild guess, but he's right that the arcing is probably a sign of a higher voltage.

So if you really want a mainstream explanation, do the experiment in a mainstream lab with proper equipment which they lack. In the absence of actually measuring what's going on, I can only give you my educated guess, which is as follows:

The "thousands of volts" may be knocking some electrons off the metal inside the light bulb, some of which contact the glass and give the glass a negative static charge. (115V probably isn't enough voltage to do this to any significant degree). Also, the little hairs on the back of your fingers can sense static electricity so I suspect that may be the cause of the sensation he feels. I don't see any reason to assume he's acting, as dragonridr suggested, and especially not when he gets shocked, because it looks like anybody would act to a real electric shock, meaning the reaction is reflex-like.

Now what happens when you put a copper strip suspended by an insulator near the bulb?

The electrons in the copper are mobile, so the electrons closest to the bulb will be repelled by the negative static charge on the glass of the bulb. What remains is a net positive charge, and this net positive charge is now attracted to the negative charge of the glass, and presto, this is why it attracts.

You can see the same thing happening in this static electricity experiment for children in the first 30 seconds, where you rub a balloon on your hair and then the charged balloon attracts an aluminum soda can. I think it's the exact same physics attracting the copper strip in the Dollard video, only the source of the static charge is different:

Physics Experiments: STATIC ELECTRICITY


So while I can't give a definitive mainstream answer about the video without definitive mainstream measurements, this looks like the same thing to me.

edit on 8-8-2014 by Arbitrageur because: fixed link



posted on Aug, 8 2014 @ 12:26 PM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur

thanks for your explanation, sounds clear and simple.

But I disagree to "static potential like in the video for kids" you have posted.


Main key in this experiment is the impulse/oscillating current of the Tesla coil.
what happens to the piece of copper is as follows..
The light-bulb is sending E-field waves because of the impulse current flowing in it.
In difference to AC current, impulse current does not osculate around zero point in positive and negative values.
It is positive or it is negative going down to zero but is not a depolarized current like AC
( hope it is clear what those Tesla currents are )
Those electric waves physically shift the electrons in copper to the opposite site further away from the source.
This piece of copper becomes a electric de-poll and gets attracted to the bulb.
Human cells however have more "negative" energy by them self and electron do move so easy, it gets repelled

How is it different from static charge you may ask,
well... static charge is caused by a surplus of electrons or under-supply of electrons.

Now.. your explanation can not be right, problem with electrostatic and copper is, as soon as it touches the glass electrons would flow into copper and repel.
This is the base how electrostatic motors work


positive gets attracted to negative, electrons flow it gets negatively charged so it will be repelled by negative and attracted by positive, touching positive releases the electrons, gets positive again..... in a cycle.


I of course agree with you on one thing, electric force, sure.

But there is no collecting electrons on the inside of the bulb, or outside
You now how hard it is to free an insulator once it is charged?
The attraction would be continuous even if the power supply is cut but it is not.


Continuing in this video starting at 34:10 one can see wireless transfer of high DC current.
edit on 8-8-2014 by KrzYma because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 8 2014 @ 12:38 PM
link   

originally posted by: KrzYma
Now.. your explanation can not be right, problem with electrostatic and copper is, as soon as it touches the glass electrons would flow into copper and repel.
No, for the same reason the balloon doesn't discharge most of its surplus electrons into the aluminum can. Try this experiment at home. The balloon still attracts the soda can even after touching it.

In both cases they both do discharge a few electrons at the exact point of contact, but this point is a very small point, and the nearby electrons can't discharge, because both glass and the balloon are non-conductive, so there's no way for the surplus electrons around the point of contact to flow to the point of contact to discharge.



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 12:28 AM
link   

originally posted by: Arbitrageur

originally posted by: KrzYma
Now.. your explanation can not be right, problem with electrostatic and copper is, as soon as it touches the glass electrons would flow into copper and repel.
No, for the same reason the balloon doesn't discharge most of its surplus electrons into the aluminum can. Try this experiment at home. The balloon still attracts the soda can even after touching it.

In both cases they both do discharge a few electrons at the exact point of contact, but this point is a very small point, and the nearby electrons can't discharge, because both glass and the balloon are non-conductive, so there's no way for the surplus electrons around the point of contact to flow to the point of contact to discharge.


your right and in the experiment he specifically stated he had to find specific bulbs. These bulbs i bet were evacuated without bake out. Meaning there is still water in the bulb. This water would create a plasma which generates ions and you have static electricity. Even in Teslas time they evacuated bulbs with a mercury pump and he used whats called brushed bulbs which produced a huge amount of static as he stated in his experiments. In fact he saw the plasma created as well just wasnt sure what was actually causing it. He mentions a pale white blue in alot of his experiments this is water vapor.



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 02:03 AM
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a reply to: KrzYma

Do you have any experiment creating a monopole just curious since to my knowledge completely theoretical and oddly you always demand proof when we explain science. However you seem to take take it as fact this theoretical object exists even though science isnt sure because its never been seen anywhere in the universe. Notto mention just the energy to make one is huge it is estimated that the a magnetic monopole would have a mass of about 10^15 GeV, compared to LHC's 10^3 GeV range. I mean even the Higgs was at 125 GeV Range and that was pushing the limits. But in your world a coils with 120 v ac is going to have enough power to create a monopole. If its that easy why arent they all over the place?



posted on Aug, 9 2014 @ 05:07 PM
link   

originally posted by: Arbitrageur

originally posted by: KrzYma
Now.. your explanation can not be right, problem with electrostatic and copper is, as soon as it touches the glass electrons would flow into copper and repel.
No, for the same reason the balloon doesn't discharge most of its surplus electrons into the aluminum can. Try this experiment at home. The balloon still attracts the soda can even after touching it.

In both cases they both do discharge a few electrons at the exact point of contact, but this point is a very small point, and the nearby electrons can't discharge, because both glass and the balloon are non-conductive, so there's no way for the surplus electrons around the point of contact to flow to the point of contact to discharge.


yes, and you can not switch the balloon off, or the electrostatic force, because as you said not all electrons discharge.
In this experiment the force vanishes if Tesla current is not flowing.

There is no electrons on the light bulb but an pulsing E field



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