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Ask any question you want about Physics

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posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 07:33 PM
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a reply to: ErosA433

Ok, I'm a bit jealous.




posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 07:58 PM
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Ok, if anyone here is knowledgeable about this particular subject, (lol. Yeah, I know that was kind of a dumb intro for this thread), what do you think or the Dukes Engine? I don't know if it's necessarily a good design for direct automotive applications, but I find the design pretty interesting. Seems like it would be really useful for generator or maybe pump applications. Here's a nice little video of it, for anyone who isn't familiar.
Dukes Engine



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 07:58 PM
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originally posted by: Arbitrageur

originally posted by: Nochzwei
Take a region on space bound by 3 coordinates. Now bring the time to stop in this volume of space and you have a portal.
Won't it be hard to move through the portal if time is stopped?

You might be able to bring time to a stop relative to Earth time inside a black hole, but otherwise I'm not sure how you could stop time. It's generally assumed that entering a black hole would probably be a lethal one way trip. If the radiation didn't kill you, the spaghettification would.
Flesh and blood lifeform will not survive in the portal imo.
Though the video of anti gravity machine I posted is well on its way to creating such a portal.



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 08:06 PM
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originally posted by: [post=19894252]ErosA433



So not only being unable to move in the first instance, but basically being atomized is not going to help so much either

Lol or worse being instantly converted into pure energy, not to mention collateral damage from this energy



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 08:15 PM
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congratulation to the winners, but what usefull application, if any, is gonna come out from this neutrino tricks
NP commitee needs some drumming, looks like. Lol
a reply to: ErosA433



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 08:31 PM
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whether you get spaghetified depends on the gradiant of curvature of the aperture and the diameter.

the larger the aperture the more gentle the gradient the longer you can go without being destroyed by gravity differences between your various parts spatial location. if the aperture is large enough you can go right through it depending on the model of wormhole or black hole.

www.sciencedirect.com...

as you can see if the throat is short though you also can acheive a absurdly benign wormhole of the stargate variety.

www.springer.com...



uncw.edu...






edit on 6-10-2015 by stormbringer1701 because: (no reason given)

edit on 6-10-2015 by stormbringer1701 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 08:44 PM
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according to Felber at low range relativistic speeds gravity becomes repulsive. so that would appear via equivelence to be a source of negative energy/mass eq.

according to classical ED the mass of all elementary matter (for example the bare mass of an electron) is negative. according to some this is not just a mathematical trick but represents a real physical fact. Dr. Woodward says if this is so then there could be some process to reveal the hidden negative mass of regular matter.

Woodward believes this because of the nature of his modified Mach/Sciama equation which contains two terms in the fields side of the equation. he has checked out one portion (the part dealing with transient mass fluctuations in accelerating matter and so far it appears his math is correct. He says that for that to be possible the second half of the fields section must also be correct. this second part of the equation is always negative and implies wormholes are valid.
edit on 6-10-2015 by stormbringer1701 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 09:25 PM
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originally posted by: pfishy
Ok, if anyone here is knowledgeable about this particular subject, (lol. Yeah, I know that was kind of a dumb intro for this thread), what do you think or the Dukes Engine? I don't know if it's necessarily a good design for direct automotive applications, but I find the design pretty interesting. Seems like it would be really useful for generator or maybe pump applications. Here's a nice little video of it, for anyone who isn't familiar.
Dukes Engine
It's a type of axial engine:


Axial engines are challenging to make practicable at typical engine operating speeds.
They aren't a new idea, here's a website showing axial engines going back to 1906:

www.aqpl43.dsl.pipex.com...

Torpedos are a good application mentioned there because axial engines fit well in a torpedo and they don't have to work very long so you don't have to worry about maintenance issues or short engine life, it only needs to last long enough to blow it up.


Ever hear of the Wankel engine? It has some of the same advantages as the Duke engine of fewer moving parts and better power to weight ratio, but there are other important considerations for engines which is the reason we're not all using Wankel engines.

Whether all the problems with Wankel engines or axial engines can be resolved to make them more competitive with conventional engines is anybody's guess. I can see the advantages of using axial engines in torpedos.



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 09:34 PM
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< ------------ Thought for a minute that EU meant European Union.

edit on 6-10-2015 by stormbringer1701 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 09:46 PM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur

Well, actually...
I used to own a Mazda RX7. I am actually a huge fan of the Wankel rotary engine. And with improved surfacing technologies and better materials being developed that can improve the quality of the axial seals the Wankel seems to be an increasingly viable EC engine technology. That, and at 9k rpm, most engines are begging for a swift death. The Rotary is still asking for a bit more pedal. It is definitely a fun little creature to have at your disposal.
But as far as having less moving parts, thus less potential points of failure, the Axial, or Dukes, engine still holds an advantage over the typical 4 cycle piston engine. I was just wondering if anyone had any particular critiques of, or insight about, the finer points of it's function, advantages or disadvantages.



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 10:26 PM
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a reply to: pfishy
So why do you think the Wankel engine isn't in more widespread use?



posted on Oct, 6 2015 @ 10:44 PM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur

It has certain inherent design inefficiencies as it currently exists, like I mentioned before. It has a higher fuel consumption rate for horsepower output as was used in the particular engine I had. And the axial seals tended to wear faster and lead to blow-by and compression loss. But it is certainly possessed of qualities that would make is a superior design for long-term design lifetime for, say, generator or maybe marine applications. And, like I said, technological advances have given it greater potential for wear and efficiency.
Ultimately, though, automotive manufacturers have invested so much in their 4 stroke piston engine designs they are likely reluctant to consider any attempt to redesign the power train of their vehicles to utilize a Wankel engine.
edit on 6-10-2015 by pfishy because: (no reason given)

edit on 6-10-2015 by pfishy because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 11:36 AM
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originally posted by: Nochzwei
congratulation to the winners, but what usefull application, if any, is gonna come out from this neutrino tricks
NP commitee needs some drumming, looks like. Lol
a reply to: ErosA433



Dumb and short sighted.
- The sheer engineering required to build the SNO experiment had many applications. It made it possible to test and develop the techniques to excavate such a large single cavern 6800ft underground. Not drastically new but still useful, making deep mining a little safer, allowing the further development of blasting designs and underground back support.

- The acrylic vessel could not be constructed out of a single piece, it was shipped underground in small panels and bonded together. While bonding acrylic was understood and something done back in the 80/90s when this experiment was under constructed, it was by no means perfected. Ever had the joy of walking through an aquarium with a underwater tunnel with no metal supports? Yeah they became possible because the company who was contracted to help build SNO, perfected their methods of bonding acrylic in almost any configuration. The experiment allowed that development, which would otherwise have been much slower.

- The design of PMTs in 'bulb' configuration where re-designed in order to give very high gain and good single photo-electron performance. PMTs were an old technology, but the device was further enhanced by the SNO collaboration with Hamamatsu to meet the experimental requirements. This development has allowed improved optics and photo-detection for medical physics

- The physics itself allowed the understanding of the fusion process occurring in the heart of the sun. Which allowed the proving of a speculative solar fusion model with real experimental data.

- It also allowed better understand and probing of cosmic rays.


All are thing that are far more than all forum warriors and EU proponents that as far as I know... have yet to get anything even down on paper coherently.



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 01:34 PM
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quite a lot of spin offs, but why dumb. Not knowing the spin offs is by no means a crime
a reply to: ErosA433



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 01:38 PM
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a reply to: Nochzwei

No, it is dumb when combined in with a statement in which you are judge jury and executioner, stating that something IS useless because YOU dont know the spin offs.

Asking for the spin-offs is fine, but when constructed in a statement as you did, it paints a very combined arrogant and ignorant judgement of research.

Most scientific minds would say "Hey i dont know about this, can you tell me more?" Then make a statement



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 02:34 PM
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originally posted by: dragonridr
a reply to: ItVibrates

Didn't give enough details but here is how you figure it out I'll give you an example.
A 3" hydraulic cylinder with cylinder area 7.065 in2 moves a 30 inches stroke in 3 seconds. Required pump capacity can be calculated as

q = 0.26 (7.065 in2) (30 in) / (3 s)

= 18.4 gpm


Thanks, this is useful for us. Please know your help is appreciated. (even tho its not metric
)

I dont want to give more info in the thread, as I dont want to pollute the thread with my project, but I will make a thread in the Survival forum sometime in the future with at least the de-sal tech on show. Hopefully I can link back here to show how you helped make the system happen.



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 03:55 PM
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originally posted by: ItVibrates

originally posted by: dragonridr
a reply to: ItVibrates

Didn't give enough details but here is how you figure it out I'll give you an example.
A 3" hydraulic cylinder with cylinder area 7.065 in2 moves a 30 inches stroke in 3 seconds. Required pump capacity can be calculated as

q = 0.26 (7.065 in2) (30 in) / (3 s)

= 18.4 gpm


Thanks, this is useful for us. Please know your help is appreciated. (even tho its not metric
)

I dont want to give more info in the thread, as I dont want to pollute the thread with my project, but I will make a thread in the Survival forum sometime in the future with at least the de-sal tech on show. Hopefully I can link back here to show how you helped make the system happen.


This may also help the pump is easy to make and runs along time if it breaks any hardware store allows you to make a new one. And remember to use brass fittings.

www.clemson.edu...
edit on 10/7/15 by dragonridr because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 07:52 PM
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originally posted by: pfishy
Ultimately, though, automotive manufacturers have invested so much in their 4 stroke piston engine designs they are likely reluctant to consider any attempt to redesign the power train of their vehicles to utilize a Wankel engine.
Mazda was already tooled up for the rotary engine but for whatever reason they chose to not use it in their other vehicles.

Since this is a conspiracy site, one theory I haven't been able to debunk is that auto manufacturers resist switching to designs that use far less parts because they have such a profitable replacements parts business. I've seen this accusation made regarding the slowness of the auto companies to transition to electric vehicles, and there does seem to be some logic to the claim but I can't confirm it either. I don't know how much of a factor that is, but if I was running a business where the parts segment was profitable I'd be reluctant to decimate that profitable part of the business also. By extension I suppose it could apply to any type of engine that uses fewer parts.

Aside from that retooling is something auto companies can afford to do over decades, but they can't do much over the space of a couple of years.

From what I gathered in that Duke engine video all they've made so far are prototypes so probably not many people have had exposure to their prototypes.


originally posted by: dragonridr
This may also help the pump is easy to make and runs along time if it breaks any hardware store allows you to make a new one. And remember to use brass fittings.

www.clemson.edu...
I know that kind of pump will work with a stream feeding it, but will it work in the ocean?



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 08:07 PM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur

I was thinking about it off shore on beaches is a cross current shouldn't be much different than a stream.
edit on 10/7/15 by dragonridr because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 09:43 PM
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Question: Does Einstein's equation e = mc2 apply to dark energy? If it does, can dark energy transform into mass? Are dark energy systems adiabatic i.e. they don't transfer or gain energy? If dark energy obeys the first law of thermodynamics, shouldn't there be some type of barrier between dark energy and rest of the universe?



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