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posted on Aug, 16 2015 @ 07:24 PM
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Im rephrasing my question: In how many ways is it possible to bend light?




posted on Aug, 16 2015 @ 07:25 PM
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a reply to: yulka

Well yes, but it would not work unless the foreground objects were massive enough to curve spacetime, and thus the path of the light, enough to send it around the magnifying object.



posted on Aug, 16 2015 @ 07:26 PM
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a reply to: yulka

Gravitation (the bending of spacetime)
Refraction (and reflection)
And and extremely high energy density, I suppose. Which would have the same effect as gravitation on spacetime.

I haven't had a chance to digest that article about sound which you posted but I'm not sure it's exactly bending light.



edit on 8/16/2015 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 16 2015 @ 07:27 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Haven't we achieved it with magnetic fields?
Or are you including that in the high energy density grab bag?



posted on Aug, 16 2015 @ 07:28 PM
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a reply to: pfishy

Well it should be just mathematics, from A-B / A-C / C-D and on.



posted on Aug, 16 2015 @ 07:30 PM
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a reply to: pfishy
I don't think we have.



posted on Aug, 16 2015 @ 07:32 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: yulka

Gravitation (the bending of spacetime)
Refraction (and reflection)
And and extremely high energy density, I suppose. Which would have the same effect as gravitation on spacetime.

I haven't had a chance to digest that article about sound which you posted but I'm not sure it's exactly bending light.


They pitched it high enough to bend it, if the sound is high enough is it dense? So in theory bending the light with sound is the same as dense mass?



posted on Aug, 16 2015 @ 07:33 PM
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a reply to: yulka



They pitched it high enough to bend it, if the sound is high enough is it dense?
That's what the article you posted says. That is not necessarily what the published paper to which the article refers says. It may be a form of refraction.



edit on 8/16/2015 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 16 2015 @ 07:36 PM
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a reply to: Phage

photonic crystals

I believe this is what I was thinking of.



posted on Aug, 16 2015 @ 07:36 PM
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originally posted by: yulka

They pitched it high enough to bend it, if the sound is high enough is it dense? So in theory bending the light with sound is the same as dense mass?


Frequency is not related to density. "Higher pitched" sound isn't going to make the medium gain mass.

Back to my question before - do you understand what sound is?



posted on Aug, 16 2015 @ 07:37 PM
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a reply to: Phage

..... What does it say.... ?


Light–sound interactions have long been exploited in various acousto-optic devices based on bulk crystalline materials. Conventionally, these devices operate in megahertz frequency range where the acoustic wavelength is much longer than the optical wavelength and a long interaction length is required to attain significant coupling. With nanoscale transducers, acoustic waves with sub-optical wavelengths can now be excited to induce strong acousto-optic coupling in nanophotonic devices. Here we demonstrate microwave frequency surface acoustic wave transducers co-integrated with nanophotonic resonators on piezoelectric ​aluminum nitride substrates. Acousto-optic modulation of the resonance modes at above 10 GHz with the acoustic wavelength significantly below the optical wavelength is achieved. The phase and modal matching conditions in this scheme are investigated for efficient modulation. The new acousto-optic platform can lead to novel optical devices based on nonlinear Brillouin processes and provides a direct, wideband link between optical and microwave photons for microwave photonics and quantum optomechanics.


I cant read this



posted on Aug, 16 2015 @ 07:38 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

the basics, yes.



posted on Aug, 16 2015 @ 07:39 PM
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a reply to: pfishy

That sounds a bit like refraction.
Maybe Bedlam could chime in on it.



posted on Aug, 16 2015 @ 07:40 PM
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a reply to: yulka
Where's the part about bending light?



posted on Aug, 16 2015 @ 07:43 PM
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a reply to: Phage

I think it is altering the path of the refraction via magnetic fields acting on the crystal, not necessarily the photons. So essentially, it is just variable refraction from what I'm gathering. But I recall having read something about this a while back, which is where I think I got the idea of magnetic fields bending light.



posted on Aug, 16 2015 @ 07:44 PM
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a reply to: Phage
Article



posted on Aug, 16 2015 @ 07:45 PM
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a reply to: yulka

Yes. I know. I saw it the first time. I don't often trust the media interpretations of scientific papers.

I mean in the published paper, the abstract of which you quoted. Where is the part about bending light?

edit on 8/16/2015 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 16 2015 @ 07:47 PM
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a reply to: Phage

So it doesnt say anything about bending light with sound does it........



posted on Aug, 16 2015 @ 07:48 PM
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a reply to: yulka
The abstract doesn't seem to. Unless you can point out where it does.



posted on Aug, 16 2015 @ 07:50 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: yulka

Gravity, as described by general relativity, is the distortion of spacetime caused by matter.

Gravity is the distortion of space. They are the same thing.


so that would mean that light IS affected by gravity. Right? Just following space-time geodesics near massive celestial body?

And why everyone is looking for graviton as gravity carrier force when it is just topological curvature?



D0



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