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Can't Teach My Dog to Lay Down on Command. Any Suggestions?

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posted on Jul, 11 2014 @ 10:41 AM
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If the dog enjoys the fetch play, then maybe try to teach the lay-down at the same time, for example when you are ready to throw the object dogs get very excited and focused at the same moment, then its your chance to make the game more excited and challenging with your commands.




posted on Jul, 11 2014 @ 12:42 PM
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Give the command to your dog to lay down. Then gently push your dog down and give a treat. Go and sit and wait for the dog to come to you, then repeat. That's how we trained our dog. I think she'd moonwalk for a treat.



posted on Jul, 11 2014 @ 06:15 PM
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a reply to: Benevolent Heretic

Hey Benevolent,

YES! I'm not using a clicker, but I discovered Michael Ellis and his marker training about 3 months ago. By and large the results have been amazing. I wish I had known about it earlier.



you can look for opportunities to click when he lies down on his own, so you can "mark" the behavior and that will help him understand what you want. For example, if normally, you go in to watch TV, and he comes in and lies down on the floor, use this as a training opportunity. Take the clicker and some treats with you and go in and sit down like you're getting ready to watch TV. When he comes in and lies down, click and treat. You don't need to say anything at this time.


You know that makes a lot of sense. I am still new to marker training and hadn't thought of applying it in that way. Great suggestion and thanks.



I love clicker training and have used it on my dogs since they were puppies. It's not the only method I use


This is why I'm so impressed with Michael Ellis. He very balanced and marker training is something he believes in very strongly but he does talk about and use other techniques. He's got a new video coming out on leash pressure and as my background is in horses, I can't wait to get it. Seems like such an underused/miss-used technique to me.




If you're interested in this method or have any questions, I'll be glad to answer them.



That's a kind offer and as I'm new to it and not sure exactly how to apply it in every situation I might just take you up on that. Again, thanks for the advice on marking the behavior whenever it occurs to start with. I hadn't thought of that. I'm going to go cut up some hot dogs


P.S. Have you ever used a tug instead of a treat? The female I've got came pretty shy and not terribly focused, I switched her to a tug, instead of food, for some of our work and the change in her personality has been dramatic, she's much more focused and confident.



posted on Jul, 11 2014 @ 07:22 PM
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It's all about energy, chill'n energy, and/or your dog does not understand.

Lie down on the floor in the position you want him/her to lie, speak the words that will trigger the act in your dog. Use a reward system, repeat the lying down with the treat and when your dog lies down give him/her the treat. It really shouldn't take too much effort when there are treats involved.



posted on Jul, 12 2014 @ 08:37 AM
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originally posted by: imwilliam
YES! I'm not using a clicker, but I discovered Michael Ellis and his marker training about 3 months ago.


Wow... I've never heard of him. I'll have to check him out. My favorite book on beginner clicker training is Click for Joy. It explains all the ins and outs.



You know that makes a lot of sense. I am still new to marker training and hadn't thought of applying it in that way. Great suggestion and thanks.


I look for opportunities to train all through the day. We don't have dedicated "training sessions" anymore, I just train when I have the opportunity. Like when I'm making dinner, I'll hold the piece of food with my arm extended out to the side and wait for the dog to look at me (my eyes/face) and when he does, I mark it with "YES!" and then toss it to him. That's a great thing to teach (Look at me). I teach all day long.



He's got a new video coming out on leash pressure and as my background is in horses, I can't wait to get it. Seems like such an underused/miss-used technique to me.


I agree. I have used the leash a lot and recommend it to people. It's highly underused. I'm always surprised when people say they can't stop their dog from jumping on people... Do you have a leash? LOL



Have you ever used a tug instead of a treat?


Absolutely! Use whatever the dog values! And if you do use hot dog, cut it into TINY pieces (I don't like the stuff in hot dogs, but it is a high-value treat, so I have used it before). I prefer a piece of cooked chicken, cut in tiny pieces. They just need the taste and a chicken breast can go a long way.

PM me if you have any questions or ask them here and then PM me to let me know.
Good luck!



posted on Jul, 12 2014 @ 11:01 AM
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Can't Teach My Dog to Lay Down on Command. Any Suggestions?

He's a rescue ... he may not be able to do that.
And if he can't .. then you should just love him all the more.



posted on Jul, 12 2014 @ 04:43 PM
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a reply to: FlyersFan

Hey Flyers,




He's a rescue ... he may not be able to do that.
And if he can't .. then you should just love him all the more.


I'm trying to think of how to say what I want to say without discounting love and affection or coming across as cold. Love and affection are so very important and both of these dogs melt my heart on a daily basis. And you're right, it's not the end of the world by any means if he doesn't learn to down on command specifically. If he never "gets it" I won't love him any less.

However, love is sometimes complicated in its expression/practice and it's not always readily apparent or
obvious as love, just as a lack of love isn't always apparent or obvious. Sometimes as it should, it gives to the beloved what they need, what's to their long term benefit, rather than the "want" of the moment.

In the case of this dog, he's young, he's strong and he's a Pit Bull. He's also a dog that's bitten in the past when he became frustrated/excited/agitated. He needs to work/train in order to grow, in order to learn how to deal with frustration/excitement and yes, he needs to learn how to mind, all for his own benefit.

See, he really loves people, but his past behavior has kept him away from them and continues to do so to a significant extant. I watched him a few months ago, he stood at the edge of the yard with his toy in his mouth, dropping it and pushing it with his nose towards the little boys across the street, all but begging them to come play with him, frankly it broke my heart. But I couldn't let him go play with them or allow them to come play with him.

Three months later, lots of training, a certain amount of pushing and pressure and now those boys come over several days a week when I'm training him and help out. Even though it's all very controlled and there's lots of rules, he loves it. I'm sure some will disagree that its even possible, but carries himself a little differently and I think I see a bit of pride in his eyes, pride in what he's accomplished and happiness in what it allows him to do.

I'm old and tired, if all he wanted to do was plop down on the sofa with me and take a nap I'd be thrilled. But it's not what he needs or wants, or at least not all of what he wants and its far below his potential. That's why we train and that's why these basic little obedience tasks are important.

So yes, love and affection, but also training/discipline and the pushing/pressure that goes with that, which I see as an expression of love



posted on Jul, 12 2014 @ 04:54 PM
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a reply to: imwilliam

I think that's beautiful! You're giving him the structure, discipline and routine that he needs in order to be a more balanced dog. That's love. A lot of people hate Cesar Milan, "but exercise, discipline and affection (in that order)" is the best way to love your dog.

I just want to thank you for taking on a Pit Bull who has bitten. It takes a special person to do that and be as apparently successful as you have been. Bravo!



posted on Jul, 12 2014 @ 07:15 PM
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a reply to: Benevolent Heretic

It's been a very rewarding experience for me Benevolent. Nobody else wanted them and I can understand why, both of them were in such rough shape and there are so many dogs to choose from. But they've really come a long way, I'm glad I stumbled on marker training, I think it's ideal for rescues.

Rescues aren't for everyone, but I'd encourage anyone thinking about a dog to at least give it some consideration . . . pros and cons. I definitely have gotten way more than I've given.

lol . . . I know lots of "serious" trainers look down on Cesar, but I think he's really gifted and has a lot to offer. I admire that he takes on the tough cases.

EDIT: Thanks again for your suggestions, I think if anything works, they will.
edit on 12-7-2014 by imwilliam because: (no reason given)



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